Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > Home, Cottage or Land Maintenance
Home Forums Gallery Webcams Blogs YouTube Channel Classifieds Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-29-2024, 09:14 AM   #1
The Real BigGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,168
Thanks: 117
Thanked 419 Times in 251 Posts
Default Ground Cover

I need to add some ground cover on a slope that is slowly washing out from winter run off. I’ve read the other posts on similar issues but I may have a twist.

I have a large fallen leaf mess to clean up each spring. I can imagine that removing the leaves from the “blueberry grass” wouldn’t make my spring work any easier. Anyone have any ideas on a planting that might solve my problem? (And water diversion has been attempted and is not a viable option.)


Sent from my iPhone using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app
The Real BigGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2024, 10:05 AM   #2
Descant
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Merrimack and Welch Island
Posts: 4,094
Thanks: 1,240
Thanked 1,538 Times in 996 Posts
Default GHround cover

I have large areas of natural blueberry, planted areas of Pachysandra and planted Vinca. All are very dense, so leaves do not settle to the ground, but blow away to adjacent lawn, or wooded areas where they settle in with other duff and absorb water. I lost traction a couple of times when a landscaper raked the ground cover areas and pulled out a lot of the ground cover in the process. He's gone and it fills back in. In spring and fall, when there are a lot of leaves, I chop everything up with the mower and use it for slopes and low areas where there isn't enough good earth to plant much. When my mower picks up only grass clippings, I use these in flower and garden beds as mulch to prevent weeds and hold moisture. Do not use grass clippings that have been treated recently with any anti-weed or pest chemicals. The grass clippings as they decompose, add nitrogen to your garden soil. If you, or your landscaper, like to rake leaves, ground cover is not for you. Aim for woodscaping, or a natural forest look for that part of your yard.
Descant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2024, 10:54 AM   #3
FlyingScot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Tuftonboro and Sudbury, MA
Posts: 2,238
Thanks: 1,136
Thanked 943 Times in 585 Posts
Default

+1 on pachysandra, and we have lots of ferns as well. Both do a great job of holding the dirt, and are pretty much maintenance-free
FlyingScot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2024, 01:27 PM   #4
root1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Alton Bay
Posts: 60
Thanks: 21
Thanked 23 Times in 17 Posts
Default

+2 on Pachysandra.
Its really tough stuff, looks reasonable; and if left uncontained, spreads like its nobody's business.

English Ivy is also a possibility. But, be aware that, once established, it is very invasive, aggressive and difficult to control.
root1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2024, 03:19 PM   #5
Descant
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Merrimack and Welch Island
Posts: 4,094
Thanks: 1,240
Thanked 1,538 Times in 996 Posts
Default

After retiring from the garden center business, my father grew fields of pachysandra. He took cuttings of 150 (he always did 151 to not shortchange anybody) and sold them to several local garden centers and green houses. They rooted them in perlite, then transferred to flats and sold at retail. You can also enhance the spread by simply pulling plants up by the roots and replanting in a new location.
Descant is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 05-30-2024, 02:02 PM   #6
The Real BigGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,168
Thanks: 117
Thanked 419 Times in 251 Posts
Default

Thanks! I thought about pachysandra (we have a ton of it at home) but was concerned that getting the leaves out would be an issue. I’ll discuss the idea with the boss (wife)!


Sent from my iPhone using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app
The Real BigGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2024, 02:39 PM   #7
Descant
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Merrimack and Welch Island
Posts: 4,094
Thanks: 1,240
Thanked 1,538 Times in 996 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Real BigGuy View Post
Thanks! I thought about pachysandra (we have a ton of it at home) but was concerned that getting the leaves out would be an issue. I’ll discuss the idea with the boss (wife)!
Perfect! She can rip some up at home with roots several inches long, put a bunch in wet newspaper for traveling and plant it at camp. It will keep for a couple of days if the newspaper package is in a plastic bag to prevent drying out. Like any new planting, keep moist until re-established. You can also just take clumps (with plenty of roots) in plastic grocery bags and plant the clumps.
Descant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2024, 06:42 PM   #8
The Real BigGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,168
Thanks: 117
Thanked 419 Times in 251 Posts
Default




Sent from my iPhone using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app
The Real BigGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.58399 seconds