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Old 09-01-2018, 11:24 AM   #1
Cindido
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Default Winter Harbor

8/30/2018 WINTER HARBOR - LAKE WINNIPESAUKEE, WOLFEBORO. A possible toxin-producing cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) bloom has been spotted appearing as green spots throughout the water and along shorelines. This is a unique cyanobacteria bloom called Gloeotrichia, appearing as small, fuzzy balls in the water. Please be advised conditions can change and bloom conditions may appear elsewhere on the lake. Lake users should avoid contact with the water in areas experiencing cyanobacteria bloom conditions and keep pets out.

http://www4.des.state.nh.us/WaterShe...BeachMaps.aspx
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Old 09-03-2018, 06:44 AM   #2
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Default Cyano

Does anyone know where in Winter Harbor the NHDES located this bloom? I see no evidence of it where I am. Is it usually confined to shoreline areas? Lots of people skiing and tubing in WH.
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Old 09-03-2018, 06:48 AM   #3
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Default Cyano

Never heard of this happening before in Winter Harbor or in Winni for that matter. To anyone's knowledge, has this ever happened before in Winter Harbor?
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Old 09-03-2018, 06:50 AM   #4
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Does anyone know where in Winter Harbor the NHDES located this bloom? I see no evidence of it where I am. Is it usually confined to shoreline areas? Lots of people skiing and tubing in WH.
We all want to know. Doesn't it seem they could be more specific? WMUR said Carry Beach was ok. Someone said they saw it, close to Keewaydin Point. I am not sure if people know what it is. I am not sure I would if I saw it, even though I have looked at all the pictures I could find.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:59 AM   #5
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Some more information here about cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), provided by the Lake Sunapee Protective Association. Written in layman's terms to make it a little easier to understand the blooms life cycle.

https://static1.squarespace.com/stat...richia2016.pdf

Last edited by Top-Water; 09-03-2018 at 11:55 AM.
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Old 09-03-2018, 08:13 PM   #6
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Default White clouds in water

Has anyone noticed the very many large white clouds that I would think is some type of algae bloom in the bay just south of the governors island bridge?
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Old 09-04-2018, 01:29 AM   #7
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Unhappy Look into the Warming Waters...Giving Scum a Bad Name...

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Some more information here about cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), provided by the Lake Sunapee Protective Association. Written in layman's terms to make it a little easier to understand the blooms life cycle.
Thanks for that easy-to-read PDF file.

It's pronounced Glee-oh-TRICK-ya. (But misspelled in capital letters in the above file).


It thrives in three condition-states in the lake. (Two—that anyone can see, but you have to look over the side of your boat).

1) A yellow tapioca-like "snowflake" suspension that may cause a rash on human skin. (Unknown if it affects pets' skin). It ranges from just below the surface to two feet and greater.

2) A pond scum, as shown collected around the dock photographed in the above PDF file. (Similar in appearance to the normal pine pollen in early summer).

It's concentrated, so it's poisonous as scum to living things.
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Old 09-09-2018, 03:00 PM   #8
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Default Cyanobacteria bloom in Winter Harbor

The cyanobacteria bloom is located at the southern end of Winter Harbor along the eastern shore near White Gate Road. It was present at Carry Beach also, but seems to have either dissipated there or moved. As of this past Wed., 9/5, the Gloeotrichia bloom was reported to be worse along the shore of White Gate Road. One of our water quality monitors for Winter Harbor spotted the bloom and collected a sample. It will be tested for toxins by NHDES.

This weekend (9/8), we have received reports of white blobs or mass like substances in Winter Harbor in the northern area, and are investigating.
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Old 09-09-2018, 03:32 PM   #9
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LWA. Thank you so much for that. It is so important for us to know where this is. People were saying it was everywhere and has been for years. I didn't see anything other than the algae that we have every year (the kind that sort of looks like frogs eggs). I think people say things without really knowing. I hope you keep us updated. Is there any place we can call or email to keep up with this? Also, who would you report milfoil to?
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:34 PM   #10
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Is there a particular reason why it may have collected at this spot? There must be some combination of water depth and movement, nutrients, sun, shade..... that cause an outbreak? is it just luck of the draw where it gathers? I always thought the water quality in that area to be quite good.
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:49 AM   #11
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We have sent photos to NHDES to identify the white blobs and algae underneath it. Have also received a report this morning that the white blobs are flowing down Smith River into Back Bay in Wolfeboro.

We cannot really predict where a bloom will occur - the conditions that favor it are sunlight, hot weather (temp), nutrients in the water column. Our organization is working to reduce nutrient loading to the lake in communities all around the lake. Currently working on a water quality study of Moultonborough Bay and Winter Harbor, so we hope to have more insight in the future.

If you want to report milfoil, algal blooms, or pollution issues/sites, you can report to us at mail@winnipesaukee.org, or call 603-581-6632. Algal blooms should also be reported directly to NHDES at 603-848-8094. Tuftonboro, Moultonborough, and Wolfeboro have Milfoil Committees, so you can report to the appropriate town as well.
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http://www.winnipesaukee.org/
http://winnipesaukeegateway.org/
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Old 09-12-2018, 07:50 AM   #12
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September 11, 2018

NHDES issues Cyanobacteria Advisory for Winter Harbor


On August 30th, the NH Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) issued a cyanobacteria advisory for Winter Harbor, Lake Winnipesaukee. A possible toxin producing cyanobacteria called Gloeotrichia was spotted along the shoreline at the southern end of Winter Harbor near Carry Beach.

On September 5th, the bloom was reported to be 10x worse, but concentrated more along the eastern shore near White Gate Road. The bloom was identified and reported by one of the Lake Winnipesaukee Association’s volunteer water quality monitors, who regularly samples several sites in Winter Harbor and is trained in cyanobacteria monitoring. This proved fortunate in being able to quickly notify the NHDES and have the advisory issued.

Additional reports of algae and cyanobacteria in other areas of Winter Harbor were reported to the Lake Winnipesaukee Association this past weekend (9/8/18).

What is cyanobacteria and should you be concerned?

Cyanobacteria (often referred to as blue-green algae due to the bluish pigment, phytocyanin, that they contain) are photosynthetic bacteria (able to produce their own food) that have been in existence for over 2.5 billion years, are a natural component of New Hampshire waterbodies, and are important organisms for the health and growth of many plants.

However, certain cyanobacteria produce toxins that can affect the nervous system, liver, or endocrine system if ingested in large enough quantity. The Gloeotrichia bloom in Winter Harbor may contain microcystins, which are a liver toxin. Because it is unknown at the time of a bloom, whether or not it is toxic, the NHDES issues an advisory to people to avoid wading or swimming in, or drinking of the infected waterbody. Pets and livestock should be kept out of the water as well.

What can be done to deter blooms?

There is a direct relationship between increased levels of nutrients (phosphorus) in the lake and aquatic plant growth, algal growth, and cyanobacteria abundance. The only way to decrease the likelihood of a cyanobacteria bloom is through continued watershed management practices that reduce nutrients to the water. For the past seven years, the Lake Winnipesaukee Association (LWA) has led the effort to develop a lake-wide watershed management plan for Winnipesaukee. To date, over 500 sites have been identified where nutrient loading could be reduced, and another 200 recommended actions to improve water quality through education and outreach, municipal regulations and ordinances, monitoring, wastewater management, and land conservation.

The LWA works with the UNH Lakes Lay Monitoring Program to oversee the water quality monitoring program on Winnipesaukee. One of the Association’s goals is to expand the monitoring program to include cyanobacteria monitoring throughout the lake. Another important goal is to begin fixing the 500 sites that are contributing pollutants to the lake.

You can help in this effort. Although shorefront property owners are the first line of defense against nutrient loading to the lake, all property owners play a role in keeping the lake clean. Stabilize soil with native plants to avoid erosion. Keep the natural vegetation and buffer along the shoreline. Do not use fertilizers or pesticides on your property. Never rake leaves or dump sand into the lake. Reduce your lawn area. All of these practices will help keep nutrients out of the lake.

If you see an algal bloom or water quality issue, please contact the Lake Winnipesaukee Association at 603-581-6632 or mail@winnipesaukee.org.
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Old 10-13-2018, 10:16 AM   #13
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Default White Clouds on Water??

An earlier poster asked about "white clouds on the water" and I admit I didn't pay much attention to the question.

Then last weekend I spotted was looked like boat fenders floating out on the water and I had to go check them out. Fenders are expensive and I couldn't figure why there would be several floating unless there was some kind of accident.

Anyway, when I got close, I realized it was a white foam, or "white clouds" floating on the water.

Then, this weekend I see "white clouds" forming on my beach, but I believe these are the normal result of light waves/ripples landing on the shoreline.

And seeing the leaves attached to the clouds floating out on the water, I assume that those clouds started on a beach and when the wind died, floated out into the water.

I'm not proposing any monumental scientific discovery here, but just thought I would follow up with my "white cloud" experience.
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Old 10-25-2018, 02:24 AM   #14
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Red face Green Algae, Blue-Green Algae, and "Send in the Clouds"...

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An earlier poster asked about "white clouds on the water" and I admit I didn't pay much attention to the question. Then last weekend I spotted was looked like boat fenders floating out on the water and I had to go check them out. Fenders are expensive and I couldn't figure why there would be several floating unless there was some kind of accident.
Anyway, when I got close, I realized it was a white foam, or "white clouds" floating on the water. Then, this weekend I see "white clouds" forming on my beach, but I believe these are the normal result of light waves/ripples landing on the shoreline. And seeing the leaves attached to the clouds floating out on the water,
I assume that those clouds started on a beach and when the wind died, floated out into the water
. I'm not proposing any monumental scientific discovery here, but just thought I would follow up with my "white cloud" experience.
• I don't think those "clouds" are anything to worry about. As you said, they collect on beaches (in late September) and when the wind dies after sunset, they gently float out away from shore.

One website I checked (25 years ago) says if the clouds smell like soap, that's their origin. If they smell like "fresh dirt", then they're naturally-occurring. Although I'm not a limnologist, I suspect late-season agitation of decaying green algae filaments forms—and reinforces—the filaments into "clouds".

• "Seeds" for blue-green algae float tapioca-like within 3-4 feet from the water's surface. They start appearing in late August. They're not the same "critter" as the various forms that green algae can take; in fact, blue-green "algae" is really bacteria.

• Green algae, on the other hand, has started appearing earlier and earlier in early Spring.

About 15 years ago, new McMansion got planted next door. Its new, wide, "footprint" caused a small rivulet to enlarge into a seasonal "babbling-brook". The McMansion also shares a leachfield with its older (and recently enlarged) neighbor. The sign of our local algae's earliest appearance (May) started in that now-engorged rivulet.

As the season warms, algae spreads, starting with small bundles attached to lake vegetation.(Indicated on left side of photo below). It breaks off with severe wake action, and rolls into a "tumbleweed" form where it invades deeper, but gradually warming, water. (Increasing to about the size of a volleyball).

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