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Old 08-06-2019, 10:30 AM   #1
mishman
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Default Lawns, fertilizer and Lake Winnipesaukee's health

Read a very disturbing article in yesterday's NY Times about a cyanobacteria outbreak that closed down the largest lake in New Jersey.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/05/n...ong-algae.html

The prime factor causing the cyanobacteria bloom was nutrients getting into the water from storm water runoff and poorly maintained septic systems. Fertilizer runoff from lawns of homes surrounding the lake was also cited as a contributing factor. Everyone, it seems, wants a lush green lawn right down to the water's edge yet that is mainlining nutrients right into the water.

Seeing all the green lawns around our lake causes me to wonder what is it going to take to cause people to wake up to the danger these lawns and the resultant fertilizer application pose for water quality. People need to educate themselves (and their neighbors) about this threat and towns around the lake need to do more to mandate a non lawnbuffer around the lake and restrict the use of fertilizers. Better yet, don't plant grass at all, use native plants and bark mulch.

All of us need to do more to protect lake water quality. Read the NYT article about this lake in NJ and think about "what if it happened here?" Property values would plummet and people would be up in arms about how did this happen? We need to take action now. The Lake Winnipesaukee Association is educating people about the water quality threats to our lake. More people should become members and spread the word.

Landscape companies should all be required to use lake friendly practices (including limiting fertilizers and use only those designed to be used near water bodies) and educate their customers about the danger of lawns immediately adjacent to lakes.

Towns along the lake and the NH DES need to be far more aggressive in protecting water quality. Please help.
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Old 08-06-2019, 11:46 AM   #2
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Default

As I see the increase in population of geese around our lakes I can't help but wonder what effect their 4-6 pounds of daily waste have on water quality. I witness first hand the "mess" they make of my shoreline. They are eating and pooping machines.

Also, I am curious if lower water levels contribute to higher surface water temps. It seems that lower volume of water may allow higher water temps which would create a better environment for cyanobacteria.
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Old 08-06-2019, 01:11 PM   #3
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Default Lakesmart

NHLAKES has a program called "LakeSmart" You can do a self evaluation to see if your property is "LakeSmart" You don't have to be direct shorefront, lots further back have runoff too. www/NHLAKES.org/lakesmart.
Getting a few places certified. I've just started the procees,and I think it will be straightforward for most islanders who have lots of trees and no lawns.

I heard recently of "blueberry sod" you can use instead of grass. Native. No fertilizer, doesn't need to be cut and it doesn't obstruct your view. AND you can eat the berries. I want to try some. Anybody know where to buy?
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Old 08-06-2019, 01:33 PM   #4
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I heard recently of "blueberry sod" you can use instead of grass. Native. No fertilizer, doesn't need to be cut and it doesn't obstruct your view. AND you can eat the berries. I want to try some. Anybody know where to buy?
No affiliation with either.
http://greenthumbfarms.com/our-products/native-sods/
https://wildsodsofmaine.com/pictures...blueberry-sod/
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Old 08-06-2019, 02:16 PM   #5
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Default water quality

I thought there were regulations on fertilizing lawns close to shore. Problem is how do you enforce that? I guess you have to prove that some one violated the regulation.

People don't care. This weekend some one was feeding ducks where I and friends were anchored. There were informed nicely not to and its against the law. The did not acknowledge the warning and continued.
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Old 08-06-2019, 03:36 PM   #6
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It is not against the law to feed ducks unless you are on public property in a town where it is prohibited. There are regulations on fertilizing lawns close to the water and the landscapers that I know use the special fertilizer for lawns.
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Old 08-06-2019, 06:09 PM   #7
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Default Middle Number Should be Zero

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I thought there were regulations on fertilizing lawns close to shore. Problem is how do you enforce that? I guess you have to prove that some one violated the regulation.

People don't care. This weekend some one was feeding ducks where I and friends were anchored. There were informed nicely not to and its against the law. The did not acknowledge the warning and continued.
Shore Things will correct be if I'm wrong, but all fertilizer in the watershed--pretty much anywhere in the towns surrounding the lake--migrates toward the lake. Unfortunately, it is completely legal to sell and use fertilizer loaded with phosphorous, the number one nutrient responsible for promoting cyanobacteria and other unwanted growth, and many people simply do not know.

If you are anywhere within one of the towns that's on the lake, it's best not to use fertilizer. But if you must, please make sure the middle number on your bag is "0". Many excellent gardeners are not aware of this. Please make sure they know if they're working at your house
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Old 08-06-2019, 08:33 PM   #8
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Default Phosphate in Lake

Braun Bay July 4, 2019

Any guesses on the increase in phosphate levels?
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Old 08-06-2019, 09:27 PM   #9
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Default Good info

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Originally Posted by Stilljester View Post
Thank you. I'd hope they have wholesale customers in NH and Lakes Region, but at least the product is available. I had forgotten about Wintergreen. We used to have some in our yard when I was a kid. The problem with shorefront plantings in many cases is there is little soil. A patch, then ledge, a patch, then thin soil over rocks. From a landscapers perspective, that may be good for visual effect. Fro DES point6 of view almost any thick brushy planting is better than grass. Or, if you have grass, don't cut it or don't re move the clippings.
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Old 08-07-2019, 08:17 AM   #10
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Default Braun Bay pollution threat

I don't understand how these large gatherings are allowed by the state and Marine Patrol. The amount of pollution (not to mention noise) that stem from these type of uncontrolled parties (let's face it, it's just one big party) with no sanitary facilities available should be measurable. E-coli levels use be high with people wondering off into the woods to relieve themselves and subsequent rains washing that back into the lake. What can be done to better protect the lake and water quality from these type of crowds?
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Old 08-07-2019, 10:25 AM   #11
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Default Hijack?

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Originally Posted by mishman View Post
I don't understand how these large gatherings are allowed by the state and Marine Patrol. The amount of pollution (not to mention noise) that stem from these type of uncontrolled parties (let's face it, it's just one big party) with no sanitary facilities available should be measurable. E-coli levels use be high with people wondering off into the woods to relieve themselves and subsequent rains washing that back into the lake. What can be done to better protect the lake and water quality from these type of crowds?
It appears you hijacked your own thread on lawns and fertilizer to move on to Braun Bay and party noise. Many (most? Who knows?) boats these days have an on board head or porta-potti. I believe one of our NH Executive Councilors owns shorefront property in Braun Bay. If they were concerned, I bet they could have DES or local health officer out there tomorrow to test the water. Everything else is speculation about what "non-"rafters do or don't do while anchored.
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Old 08-07-2019, 02:33 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mishman View Post
Read a very disturbing article in yesterday's NY Times about a cyanobacteria outbreak that closed down the largest lake in New Jersey.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/05/n...ong-algae.html

The prime factor causing the cyanobacteria bloom was nutrients getting into the water from storm water runoff and poorly maintained septic systems. Fertilizer runoff from lawns of homes surrounding the lake was also cited as a contributing factor. Everyone, it seems, wants a lush green lawn right down to the water's edge yet that is mainlining nutrients right into the water.

Seeing all the green lawns around our lake causes me to wonder what is it going to take to cause people to wake up to the danger these lawns and the resultant fertilizer application pose for water quality. People need to educate themselves (and their neighbors) about this threat and towns around the lake need to do more to mandate a non lawnbuffer around the lake and restrict the use of fertilizers. Better yet, don't plant grass at all, use native plants and bark mulch.

All of us need to do more to protect lake water quality. Read the NYT article about this lake in NJ and think about "what if it happened here?" Property values would plummet and people would be up in arms about how did this happen? We need to take action now. The Lake Winnipesaukee Association is educating people about the water quality threats to our lake. More people should become members and spread the word.

Landscape companies should all be required to use lake friendly practices (including limiting fertilizers and use only those designed to be used near water bodies) and educate their customers about the danger of lawns immediately adjacent to lakes.

Towns along the lake and the NH DES need to be far more aggressive in protecting water quality. Please help.
Fake News. LOL


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Old 08-07-2019, 05:31 PM   #13
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Ya know I just read a law that was enacted in Connecticut making people culpable for any damage they do to their neighbor’s property if they plant bamboo in their yard. Why the hell can’t NH enact a law prohibiting fertilizer distribution within 25 yards or so from the lake?


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Old 08-07-2019, 05:38 PM   #14
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Why do people never read previous comments?
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Old 08-07-2019, 06:16 PM   #15
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Default Fertilizers

I've been talking about this for years, the green lawns are not good for the water quality. 60's and 70's I could find crayfish under every other rock I flipped over. By the 90's they were few and far between and now there are NONE! Some say they have moved offshore but I'm not so sure. I used to tell my next door neighbor who had the green lawn and he did not seem to care or believe me that his fertile lawn was ruining the water. Very sad
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Old 08-07-2019, 08:18 PM   #16
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Well, my lawn grows plenty on its own. I'll never encourage it with fertilizer!

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Old 08-08-2019, 10:28 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mishman View Post
I don't understand how these large gatherings are allowed by the state and Marine Patrol. The amount of pollution (not to mention noise) that stem from these type of uncontrolled parties (let's face it, it's just one big party) with no sanitary facilities available should be measurable. E-coli levels use be high with people wondering off into the woods to relieve themselves and subsequent rains washing that back into the lake. What can be done to better protect the lake and water quality from these type of crowds?
Don't wonder about how these large gathering are allowed to happen. Everything going on with the large gatherings in Bruan Bay is perfectly legal. And the Marine Patrol, routinely check it out over the weekends, make sure all the rafting rules are being observed.

Also another post mentioned about boats having facilities oboard these days. And while that is true, have you every tried to use those facilities? Plus you have to have them pumped out etc..... So how many people want to go through the hassle to use there on board facilites.... On larger boats I am sure they do.... on smaller boats not so much..... There is plenty of Pee-Pee in that water every weekend.....
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Old 08-08-2019, 11:03 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by LIforrelaxin View Post
Don't wonder about how these large gathering are allowed to happen. Everything going on with the large gatherings in Bruan Bay is perfectly legal. And the Marine Patrol, routinely check it out over the weekends, make sure all the rafting rules are being observed.

Also another post mentioned about boats having facilities oboard these days. And while that is true, have you every tried to use those facilities? Plus you have to have them pumped out etc..... So how many people want to go through the hassle to use there on board facilites.... On larger boats I am sure they do.... on smaller boats not so much..... There is plenty of Pee-Pee in that water every weekend.....
Peeing in the lake is distasteful (intentional pun) to most people, so I don't think as many people do it as you seem to believe. On smaller lakes where there few or no marinas, pump out may be an extra chore, but all the marinas I know on Winni have pump outs and many don't charge if you're buying gas. The attendant asks if you want a pump out and you say yes or no. It's that easy.
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