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Old 02-02-2019, 05:28 PM   #1
bigdog
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Default Well water GPM ?

Is there an average gallons per minute that a drilled Well should provide ?
Not sure of the Well depth, but know for sure it's not Artisian.

Thanks for your feedback !
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:19 PM   #2
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There is no average GPM for a well. There are many variables depending on the area you are in.

If you are having one drilled on your property, I would suggest having them drill until they have a minimum of 5 GPM. They may have to go deeper to find another vein, but it is worth it n the long run.
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:21 PM   #3
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Gallons per minute produced by a well varies widely. Ours is 40 gpm. A lot depends on the static level in your well, the depth of the well and the depth of your pump.

See link below from NH DES which seems to recommend 5 gpm.

https://www.des.nh.gov/organization/...s/dwgb-1-8.pdf
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:49 PM   #4
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I remember years ago Chuck Roth drilled a well for us and he stopped counting at 20 gpm. He was at the time trying to find water for the Moultonborough School and said if he could get 2 gpm he would be happy. I don't remember how it all turned out but they obviously got water. Probably the regulations didn't require as much in those days as they do now. (if it was even regulated.)
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:02 PM   #5
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Chuck Roth drilled two wells for us. One in 1983 and the second in 2012. He is still in business.
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:06 PM   #6
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Chuck Roth drilled two wells for us. One in 1983 and the second in 2012. He is still in business.
He drilled that one for us in 1980 I think.
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:11 PM   #7
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Default usage?

Old house, old heavy use appliances? New house with low flow showers and toilets? New clothes washer? Just like septic--how many bedrooms? Deep well stores water in the column, and needs less flow. A shallow well may need more GPM flow, and now you start talking about gravel vs bedrock, etc.
You need an expert, not this Forum.
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Old 02-03-2019, 07:27 AM   #8
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With the recent deep freeze, maybe the underground water line partially froze up? Water line gets slushy at first before going totally blocked, slowing the water flow, and makes the needle on the pressure gauge go very shakey-wakey, the needle pulsates, as tank slowly fills up to 50-psi, if it makes it.

If the pump is in the house, like in the basement, then it is a shallow well of 32' depth or less. Drawing water from a lake is same as a shallow well. If there's no pump inside house, then probably is a drilled well which has pump at bottom of drilled hole in ground within the drill pipe.

Many older homes in NH that are situated on a lake draw water from lake, because a shallow well is basically a do-it-yourself job, more or less, as opposed to the BIG money, well driller.

Best place to go for water system advice and water items is Lakeport Hdwe store in Laconia .... and then price shop it at nearby Lowe's .... and do not trust your well water for drinking it.
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Old 02-03-2019, 07:46 AM   #9
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Sounds / Reads like an ongoing problem for you, what was the outcome of this problem. (link below) You never replied after folks tried to help you.

As mentioned you probably need to seek out a professional.

https://www.winnipesaukee.com/forums...ad.php?t=23723
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:09 AM   #10
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http://gilfordwell.com/docs/water_supply.pdf
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Old 02-03-2019, 10:15 AM   #11
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The following statement made by FLL is not correct:
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatlazyless
If the pump is in the house, like in the basement, then it is a shallow well of 32' depth or less. Drawing water from a lake is same as a shallow well. If there's no pump inside house, then probably is a drilled well which has pump at bottom of drilled hole in ground within the drill pipe.
Water pumps located in your basement can be either a shallow well pump (<32’) or a jet pump. Deep well jet pumps are designed to pull water up from depths greater than 25 feet up to about 200 feet. A shallow well pump will only have one pipe going to the well. A jet pump will have two lines going to the well.
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Old 02-03-2019, 10:46 AM   #12
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With regards to the laws of physics, and the viscosity of water, a pump located at the top of the well pipe, similar to sucking water up a straw, can only suck up water going down to a depth or difference in elevation of 32'.

A deep drilled well has the pump down at the bottom, contained within the narrow pipe, and pushes the water up from a depth of 100-200-300-500-750-etc feet.

A shallow well drawing water from a lake or from in the ground has the pump up at the top, capable to work drawing down to 32'.

The pump used for shallow well are sometimes called a jet pump. Am not sure what's the difference between a jet pump and the standard impeller pump that draw up the water, if there is any difference?
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:23 AM   #13
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A deep well jet pump has a venturi (jet) and a check valve (foot valve) located in the well to enable the pump to pump water >32 ft. The jet and foot valve are located 10 to 20 ft below the minimum water level in the well. One pipe mounted to the impeller housing of the pump, drives water down into the jet body located in the well. A second pipe connects the output side of the jet body back to the pump. Like shallow-well systems, a jet pump in a deep-well system needs to be primed to operate. The foot valve at the bottom of the well piping prevents water from draining from the pipes and pump.
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Old 02-03-2019, 03:58 PM   #14
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Default ..... Live Free or Die!

A big difference exists between Massachusetts and New Hampshire for household water pressure, how it comes out of the kitchen sink.

Here in 2019, Massachusetts has a minimum wage of $12/hour, while New Hampshire has a minimum wage of $7.25/hour.

Similarly, Massachusetts' municipal water comes out your kitchen sink at maybe 75-psi, while the New Hampshire kitchen sink supplied by an individual well and pump, comes out at 30 to 50-psi. That's a big difference ..... that's a big difference ...... slow & steady wins the race ...... that's the New Hampshire Advantage ..... Live Free or Die! ...... (sarcasm here!)

Massachusetts is simply higher powered .... and Massachusetts is basically what powers up the New Hampshire economy.
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Old 02-03-2019, 04:39 PM   #15
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Don’t even consider a dug well! You will have some kind of contamination before you know it. Thy are too shallow. My opinion is that they are only good for arro they are only good for irrigation.
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Old 02-03-2019, 05:05 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatlazyless View Post
Big difference between Massachusetts and New Hampshire for household water pressure, coming out of the kitchen sink.

Here in 2019, Massachusetts has a minimum wage of $12/hour, while New Hampshire has a minimum wage of $7.25/hour.

Similarly, Massachusetts municipal water comes out your kitchen sink at maybe 95-psi, while the New Hampshire kitchen sink supplied by an individual well, comes out at 30-50-psi. That's a big difference ..... that's a big difference ..... that's a big difference ...... slow & steady wins the race ...... that's the New Hampshire Advantage ..... Live Free or Die!

Massachusetts is simply higher powered .... and is what powers up the NH economy.
Each community is different and the location of your home to the primary main or pump station can make a difference in water pressure. Anything over 75# should have a pressure reducing valve on it. I've seen homes with 100+ pounds on a gauge and a few streets over 50#! It's got nothing to do with minimum wage or Massachusetts...
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Old 02-03-2019, 06:00 PM   #17
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Something like plus-95% of the 1200 condos, and 125 single family homes in Waterville Valley are on town water and sewer, and the water pressure is good and strong. Supposedly, town water pressure in WV is 125-psi, and then the individual home's pressure reducing valve lowers it down to 75-psi.

That's another reason why Waterville Valley almost seems more like a Boston suburb located between Wellesley and Weston, over on Winter St., or something like that. Plus the taste, drink-ability, and water quality, for the WV water is so totally good, they should bottle it and sell it to the rest of New Hampshire ..... must be that Osceola-Tecumseh, from high-up-on-the-mountain .... Mad River valley water ..... gurgle, gurgle, gurgle ..... ayuh!

After all ..... not for nothing ..... is Waterville named Waterville ...... the Valley was added in about 1966 when the town was re-incorporated after going through de-incorporation years earlier ..... so, what are the first five letters in Waterville? ........ W-A-T-E-R ....... so's it just makes sense that Waterville has good town water.
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Old 02-04-2019, 07:48 AM   #18
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Our well is 2.8 GPM. It is 540 feet down. It does fine with the 100 gallon tank in the basement, but I do wish more a bit more power when washing a car!
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:21 AM   #19
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100 gallon tank? That is huge! My well is at 250’ and produces about 5 GPM (was “semi-artesian” until all the neighbors went from big wells to drilled.). I have a deep well pump and a 10 gallon pressure tank and have never had a water problem even with everything going (washer, dishwasher, shower, etc.

Sorry FLL, I’m in MA. We just must be BETTER. FYI, anyone running more that 65 psi water pressure at the house is running serious risk of a failure.


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Old 02-04-2019, 08:23 AM   #20
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“Dug wells” not “big wells”


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Old 02-04-2019, 08:28 AM   #21
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I drilled a new well two years ago when we rebuilt. At 600 ft I had just under 1.5 gallons per minute. Opted to fract the well and picked up 1.5 gallons. So I sit around 3 gallons a minute. Never had a problem even when puttin In lawn and watering three times a day. Lot of water held in a 600 ft pipe with the pump down low
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:59 AM   #22
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The last well I had done was 30 years ago and this old guy came out with a stick "dowser" to find the best spot to drill. Do they still do that today?
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Old 02-04-2019, 11:53 AM   #23
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There used to be a great dowser in Wolfeboro named Royall Prindle. He was a great guy and supposedly a great dowser. We had him come out and pick a spot for our well. He was so interesting to talk to. You could spend hour after hour with him. He was the seventh son of the seventh son.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:59 PM   #24
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Default pounders vs rotary

There are two types of machines used in creating wells, pounders and rotarys. Rotarys have nearly taken over the well drilling industry due to their speed and simplicity but many would argue that pounders are superior for the Granite State.
A rotary drills down into the bedrock and discharges the waste upward with high pressure air. A simple hole is created in the bedrock and some of the drilling discharge is actually packed into the pores in the rock by the pressure, limiting the groundwater flow. Rotarys work really fast and a well can thus be far less costly overall to produce.
A pounder will hammer a drill bit, rotating it just a little with each blow. The hammering action can be really tiresome to listen to and is much slower than a rotary, but each blow will actually fracture open cracks in the bedrock and this can drastically increase the flow. About every twenty minutes or so the operator will need to withdrawn the rotary hammer bit and lower a clamshell into the hole to withdraw the waste. This slows the operation down even more.
The end result of favoring a pounder is that it will shatter open the rock around a well again greatly increasing the water flow. Hydrofracing gives a quick burst of pressure into the drilled hole in hopes of producing the same shattering but much of the fracturing effect can be lost due to silt being forced even deeper into the grain by the burst of pressure.
My last two wells were done using a rotary to punch down to the bedrock, and then having Dave Kelso from Canterbury set up his pounder over the drilledwell to hammer the last 100 feet. My current well is 270 feet total with 170 feet of casing and has a little too much iron to be perfect, but the amount of water I have is endless. Dave also did a well for a buddy on the other side of New Hampton and there he was lucky enough to hit ledge in less than twenty feet, went only 100 feet total, and Bob too has an endless supply of water. Shallower wells generally have higher quality water and Bob's would rival the Castle's.
I think that Dave has retired and is getting ready to sell his pounder, but if you can find someone that still uses a pounder it is a great way to revitalize an old drilled well
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Old 02-06-2019, 06:37 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NH.Solar View Post
There are two types of machines used in creating wells, pounders and rotarys. Rotarys have nearly taken over the well drilling industry due to their speed and simplicity but many would argue that pounders are superior for the Granite State.
A rotary drills down into the bedrock and discharges the waste upward with high pressure air. A simple hole is created in the bedrock and some of the drilling discharge is actually packed into the pores in the rock by the pressure, limiting the groundwater flow. Rotarys work really fast and a well can thus be far less costly overall to produce.
A pounder will hammer a drill bit, rotating it just a little with each blow. The hammering action can be really tiresome to listen to and is much slower than a rotary, but each blow will actually fracture open cracks in the bedrock and this can drastically increase the flow. About every twenty minutes or so the operator will need to withdrawn the rotary hammer bit and lower a clamshell into the hole to withdraw the waste. This slows the operation down even more.
The end result of favoring a pounder is that it will shatter open the rock around a well again greatly increasing the water flow. Hydrofracing gives a quick burst of pressure into the drilled hole in hopes of producing the same shattering but much of the fracturing effect can be lost due to silt being forced even deeper into the grain by the burst of pressure.
My last two wells were done using a rotary to punch down to the bedrock, and then having Dave Kelso from Canterbury set up his pounder over the drilledwell to hammer the last 100 feet. My current well is 270 feet total with 170 feet of casing and has a little too much iron to be perfect, but the amount of water I have is endless. Dave also did a well for a buddy on the other side of New Hampton and there he was lucky enough to hit ledge in less than twenty feet, went only 100 feet total, and Bob too has an endless supply of water. Shallower wells generally have higher quality water and Bob's would rival the Castle's.
I think that Dave has retired and is getting ready to sell his pounder, but if you can find someone that still uses a pounder it is a great way to revitalize an old drilled well
Unfortunately finding some one to pound a well is nearly impossible today...they produce the most water a well could have. I have one producing over 22 gpm.
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