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Old 09-16-2013, 04:27 PM   #1
chocophile
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Default Water Hose Left In Over Winter

Our seasonal camp draws water from the lake using a black "plastic" hose. Since we bought the house 13 years ago, I've always removed the hose when we close up for the fall, but I know lots of people leave their hoses in all winter.

Our shore line is on an open bay and is exposed to NW wind. I'm concerned that a hose left in over the winter could get embedded in a sheet of ice and break off or move.

I'm not interested in heating the line during the winter.

Any experience with leaving a hose in all winter? Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-16-2013, 05:13 PM   #2
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We leave ours in, been doing it for 25+ years. Some of it runs under the ground, not deep, just enough so we don't trip over it.
We do, however, drain the house in the fall and get enough water out of the pipe so whatever is left has room to expand if it freezes.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:03 PM   #3
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The black plastic becomes brittle in the cold, so don't run over it with trucks or snow machines. It needs to be drained, we blow air through ours to make sure. We cap off the ends with screening so critters don't look for a home but it still drains of condensation. Otherwise in the spring and the start of the season we find air leaks at the fittings and over the years pin holes develop in areas; these cause the prime to be lost if you can even get it. Otherwise leave it out.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:43 PM   #4
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For the 10 years I was on Cow myself and as far as I know all of my neighbors removed the hoses. I think it was the best way to make sure that all of the water was drained. If you are in a windy area I might worry about the ice ripping the hose in half as you said. I think the hose is cheap enough to warrant an experiment on your part. Just be ready in the spring with plan B.
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Old 09-17-2013, 04:31 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chocophile View Post
Our seasonal camp draws water from the lake using a black "plastic" hose. Since we bought the house 13 years ago, I've always removed the hose when we close up for the fall, but I know lots of people leave their hoses in all winter.

Our shore line is on an open bay and is exposed to NW wind. I'm concerned that a hose left in over the winter could get embedded in a sheet of ice and break off or move.

I'm not interested in heating the line during the winter.

Any experience with leaving a hose in all winter? Thanks in advance.
Hose? Pipe? Water-Line?
____________________


• There are different "plastics": Does your hose line have a gloss-black finish, very hard to bend—and does it float in water?


• If it sounds like the same material, our former neighbors left their "plastic" hose line floating in the lake—exposed to both North and NW winter winds—for nearly 60 years. After replacing a steel pipe—about 40 years ago—we've done the same with our "plastic" line—but weighted with bricks.


• This kind of sturdy "plastic" line is not readily available in the South, and is just about the only product that doesn't get chewed to pieces by Red Squirrels.


• The new buyer-neighbor hooked up to a new drilled well, but there have been "well-issues". Last week, they sought my advice on changing-back to water from the lake!

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Old 09-17-2013, 08:46 AM   #6
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Default "Plastic" Hose

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Hose? Pipe? Water-Line?
____________________
• There are different "plastics": Does your hose line have a gloss-black finish, very hard to bend—and does it float
Yes, that's it: hard to bend and floats. I weigh it down with rocks. I guess the rocks could be moved by ice and it could float to the surface.

It seems like very durable material that could take some stress from the ice.

I agree that lake water is the best (with a good treatment system).

Thanks for the comments.
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