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Old 09-26-2016, 10:36 AM   #1
bbfan33
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Default Another Battery: question jumping a battery

I have heard different opinions concerning jumping a dead boat battery, and would appreciate the wisdom of the forum.

In the event that your boat battery is drained/dead so your boat (I/O) will not start..(someone left the radio on, etc... )
do you remove the battery from the engine compartment to jump/charge the battery
or
do you just hook up the jumper/charger as you would a car.

Any opinions concerning best option: charger vs jumper?

thanks as always
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Old 09-26-2016, 10:42 AM   #2
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Default Jumping battery in boat

I see no reason you can't jump the battery in the boat. Just make sure the engine compartment is well vented as you will get a spark when connecting the cables.

I have helped people over the years with my portable jump pack and never had an issue.
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Old 09-26-2016, 10:50 AM   #3
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Default jumping battery in boat

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Is the jumper pack you use idenitical to ones used for car batteries, or does it need to have special specs?
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:31 AM   #4
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Is the jumper pack you use idenitical to ones used for car batteries, or does it need to have special specs?
Not sure about his, but mine is the same as I use for the car, golf cart, lawn tractor, etc.

I have never seen a "marine specific" booster pack, but given the ability to charge a premium for all things marine-grade, I'm sure you could find one

The biggest issue, as others have noted, is the risk of spark in an enclosed bilge (likely not a problem on a 'toon). When/if you are going to connect ANYTHING to your battery (charger, jump pack, jumper cables, or even the battery itself in the spring) make sure the bilge is well ventilated. If you cannot run the blower, open the compartment and smell for fumes, give it a few minutes to let fresh air circulate if it has been closed up.
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:51 AM   #5
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The biggest issue, as others have noted, is the risk of spark in an enclosed bilge (likely not a problem on a 'toon). When/if you are going to connect ANYTHING to your battery (charger, jump pack, jumper cables, or even the battery itself in the spring) make sure the bilge is well ventilated. If you cannot run the blower, open the compartment and smell for fumes, give it a few minutes to let fresh air circulate if it has been closed up.[/QUOTE]

The other potential concern I would have is on the electronics.

I am real conservative when it comes to batteries. If it were me, I would take the extra time to remove it, put it on a charger, and reinstall it.
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Old 09-26-2016, 11:55 AM   #6
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Personally I would remove it and charge, as already mentioned. Or, if you jump it in place make the final connection to the jumper battery outside so any connecting spark happens in the open air.
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:17 PM   #7
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I'd be sure to sniff (with your nose) the bilge and be sure you are not smelling any gasoline fumes. If no fumes, then it's safe.

Next, I would shut off the battery switch (if you have it) before connecting the jumper cables.

Be sure that every load on the boat is turned off, this is all lights, radios, electronics; basically every electrical load should bed turned off.

Connect the dead battery to the jumper cables from the good battery. Be sure the good battery's engine is running now to charge the 'bad' battery.

Then let the charging system run for a short time while connected to the bad battery.

Next turn on the battery switch, this should keep electronics from seeing a surge or noise from a 'spark' type of connection.

Then attempt to start the engine. If it runs, let it run for a bit.

If it won't crank, wait a while and try again. If it still won't crank, you need more help than a quick jump.

Be careful removing the cables, don't allow them to short to each other or to anything on either boat.

Basically, this is the same you would do on a car, but you need to be extra vigilant to be sure there are no gasoline fumes around. Remember gas fumes will be at the bottom of the bilge as they are heavier than air.
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Old 09-26-2016, 01:14 PM   #8
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If you using a 120 volt charger vs a jump pack then simply attach to the battery before plugging into ac power.You wont get any spark.
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Old 09-26-2016, 04:39 PM   #9
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Is the jumper pack you use idenitical to ones used for car batteries, or does it need to have special specs?

It's a standard car jump pack, nothing special. If you are concerned with any sensitive electronics you have shut them off before connecting the jump pack or jumper cables.

I don't see a difference between connecting a jump pack/jumper cables or reconnecting a battery. You will get a spark either way if there is something is drawing power. Just make sure there is no gas smell in your bilge.
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Old 09-26-2016, 05:23 PM   #10
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You can hook jumper cables to the boat battery, then connect the jump pack to those cables outside the bilge for the reasons mentioned above; any spark outside.
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Old 09-26-2016, 08:51 PM   #11
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Many boats have multiple batteries, and much heavier duty than a car. A cheap jump pack may not have the "oomph" that a "professional" grade has. I had dead batteries and a fully charged box. No go. Borrowed the heavy duty one from the Marina and started right up. Now I have a top of the line that also can run AC. Being well prepared, now I never need it, but it also blows toys up faster. and I don't need a separate air pump. There is a separate thread about jump packs and alternatives.
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Old 09-27-2016, 07:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Descant View Post
Many boats have multiple batteries, and much heavier duty than a car. A cheap jump pack may not have the "oomph" that a "professional" grade has. I had dead batteries and a fully charged box. No go. Borrowed the heavy duty one from the Marina and started right up. Now I have a top of the line that also can run AC. Being well prepared, now I never need it, but it also blows toys up faster. and I don't need a separate air pump. There is a separate thread about jump packs and alternatives.
I have a similar jump pack. Air compressor for the toys (and the boat trailer tire!) A built in light and the best feature is a switch that you activate AFTER making the connection to the battery you are jumping. This practically eliminates the spark possibility. 500 amps of jumping power. I've never needed it to jump my own boat, but it has helped countless others.

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Old 09-28-2016, 08:12 PM   #13
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Yes no special jump pack is needed.

Once you get yourself going, get to a charger as soon as you can for the purpose of your alternator is merely to sustain / maintain.

The 'more dead' the battery, the harder the engine has to turn your alternator as it is (alternator) wanting to put out some pretty high current to get the battery back up there... thus an unnecessary strain on the alternator.

Heat builds in the alternator and the high charge rate builds heat in the battery.

Heat is the killer. No good.

Battery will gas more violently. In certain instance when equalizing is the purpose, even then excessive heat should be avoided.

In an ideal situation, and most all do not do this, is to jump you car, get going where you have to be, and charge with a charger asap at a more relaxed rate such as 10 amps or less.

(safely a max of 20% of combined AH capacity -- [roughly 24-31 series batts are about 75-130 AH]

so basically charging at a max rate of 20% (10-15amps) will be ok , additionally this is why most chargers on the shelf average 10 amps. and 20amps on occasion if you look hard enough)


As per the former question about storage:

Do NOT top off water before battery is fully charged and NEVER allow plates to become visible.

Charge thoroughly and Disconnect the negative, tape up terminals.

Years and Years of service if batteries don't have a chance to sulfate
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