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Old 11-28-2011, 07:44 PM   #1
Jonas Pilot
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Default A bunch of pigs!

NH's invasion of the wild pigs.

I wonder if this will ever effect us up here in the Lakes Region.

Nationally, documented feral swine populations are on the rise. No other states directly surrounding New Hampshire have documented feral swine populations; the state started seeing reports of feral swine about 1985.

http://www.unionleader.com/article/2...WS01/711289958
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Old 11-28-2011, 08:15 PM   #2
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Default Seen wild pigs in Louisiana

While living in Louisiana from 1974 to 1981, I did a lot of deer hunting in NW LA. The area we hunted was hundreds of acres and besides being great deer hunting, it also had a lot of feral pigs. They would root around and drive you crazy while sitting on a deer stand. Had a few come in close to me, but never did get a shot off.

They did not come down into the cities, but the digging they did in the woods was remarkable. Not that my lawn up here is that great, but I certainly hope they do not make it to Alton.
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Old 12-01-2011, 11:35 AM   #3
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That probably explains why there are 2 reality shows on wild hogs!
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Old 12-01-2011, 06:00 PM   #4
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Southeastern NH....means Mass and Vermont too...unless pigs obey state border lines.

On another forum a member stated that he had seen some while deer hunting once and has talked with other hunters that have bagged a couple in that area.

I've heard they are great culinary fair.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:57 PM   #5
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Actually, I believe the pig problem in NH pre-dates 1985 by a long shot.

After spending a few weeks backpacking the Great Smoky Mountains in NC & Tennessee during college (we made it a spring break ritual), I became interested in the pigs. There's a very large population in the Smokies. North Florida has a ton as well. Anyway, while doing a little reading on the subject I learned that the three big concentrations in the U.S. were in the Smokies, north Florida, and a pocket in west-central New Hampshire.

In NH, like other locations, they are believed to have descended from European wild boars that were imported specifically for private hunting reserves - perhaps as long ago as the 1800s. Predictably, some were not killed, and later migrated, mated with domestic swine, and established a population.

According to one site I just found in a quick search...

"The First 'Pure Russian' wild boars were brought into the US by Austin Corbin. They were released into a 20,000 acre enclosure in Sullivan County New Hampshire in 1890.'


And the State of Wisconsin's DNR site had the following:
History of Feral Pigs in America
Domestic pigs were introduced from Europe to the Americas by Spanish explorers. Over time, some pigs escaped or were intentionally released into the wild. Subsequently, free-ranging, feral populations established themselves on American soil.

In 1893, 50 feral pigs from Germany's Black Forest were released on a hunting preserve in New Hampshire's Blue Mountains. Later, in 1910 and 1912, Russian wild boars were released on a North Carolina preserve near the Tennessee border. Russian wild boars were released again in 1925 near Monterey, California and a few years later on Santa Cruz Island. Some of these transplants escaped from the hunting preserves. Many of their offspring bred with feral descendants of domestic pigs.

Today, feral pigs and hybrids of the Russian wild boars are found in 23 states with the possibility of yet-undiscovered populations in several more states. The largest populations are in the coastal states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico and California (not surprising, since Spanish explorers settled these territories). Feral pigs are found chiefly in western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee, West Virginia and, in California, on Santa Cruz Island and Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties. Small numbers of pigs are found in New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Vermont, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina and Texas.

In locations where feral pigs have more recently been discovered it is likely that these "run-wild" individuals are the result of unintentional escapes from domestic swine facilities, escapes or releases from game farms, or illegal stocking. Biologists estimate the nationwide population of feral pigs to be around four million animals.
At any rate, I can't remember where I first read all of this, but it might've been a local paper. I have a cousin in North Florida who used to hunt the wild pigs down there -- kinda the red neck version of the fox hunt, using pit bulls and pickup trucks and rifles. They're quite tasty, actually.

As for reproductive capabilities, once a sow reaches breeding age at 7 or 8 months of age they can be responsible for 1,000 plus feral swine in a five-year period.

With this in mind, perhaps we should find a way to increase that mountain lion population...
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Old 12-02-2011, 04:20 PM   #6
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During the hurricane of 1938 the fence around Corbin Park in Cornish got pushed down in a few places. The wild pigs escaped and tore the heck out of the farmers corn fields. My ex father-in-law sued and got reimbursed by the state of NH.

His property boarded the park, still there as a private hunting preserve.
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Old 12-02-2011, 04:55 PM   #7
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Default nh wildlife journal

the magazine of nh fish and game dept. had an article last month about them. i think it stated that des would like reports of any sightings. you can probably read the article on the des website: http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/Wild...nal/WJ_mag.htm
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Old 12-02-2011, 09:30 PM   #8
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I've seen them on one of my road trips across the south in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Florida. All were dead along the road. I think I first noticed them in Tennessee though I wasn't sure what they were until it dawned on me in 'Bama.

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Old 12-06-2011, 01:02 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Jonas Pilot View Post
I've seen them on one my road trips across the south in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Florida. All were dead along the road. I think I first noticed them in Tennessee though I wasn't sure what they were until it dawned on me in 'Bama.
What a horrible waste of pork product.
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Old 12-07-2011, 07:42 AM   #10
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I've seen them on one of my road trips across the south in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Florida. All were dead along the road. I think I first noticed them in Tennessee though I wasn't sure what they were until it dawned on me in 'Bama.
They are considered varmints down south and typically they carry lots of diseases. My friend was in Texas last week and he was shooting these varmints since all other hunting seasons were closed. I asked about the meat and he said because of the disease they just toss them on the side of the road for the buzzards.
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Old 12-07-2011, 09:04 AM   #11
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They are considered varmints down south and typically they carry lots of diseases. My friend was in Texas last week and he was shooting these varmints since all other hunting seasons were closed. I asked about the meat and he said because of the disease they just toss them on the side of the road for the buzzards.
Thats is ridiculous and your friend should not be allowed to hunt. The only thing causing disease is your friends rotting boars on the side of the road. I have been hunting Texas for Deer and Boar every year for the past five years leaving the day after Christmas each year with my Friend and our Boys. Wild Boar hunting is alot of fun and the meat is fantastic. From the marinated back straps to the slow cook pulled pork BBQ roast and smoked sausage the meat is amazing.

People like your friend is what gives real hunters a bad name.

I can also say that a Wild Boar population should be kept under controll because they do cause alot of property damage and multipli faster than rabbits.
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Old 12-07-2011, 08:05 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by anthonyrenee2nh View Post
Thats is ridiculous and your friend should not be allowed to hunt. The only thing causing disease is your friends rotting boars on the side of the road. I have been hunting Texas for Deer and Boar every year for the past five years leaving the day after Christmas each year with my Friend and our Boys. Wild Boar hunting is alot of fun and the meat is fantastic. From the marinated back straps to the slow cook pulled pork BBQ roast and smoked sausage the meat is amazing.

People like your friend is what gives real hunters a bad name.

I can also say that a Wild Boar population should be kept under controll because they do cause alot of property damage and multipli faster than rabbits.
Anthony:

He was on private land where these pigs cause extreme damage. In texas you can hunt them over bait, with dogs and at night with spot lights. They are considered varmints and the population is out of control. Texas even allows the use of helicopters (see below)


The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved rules allowing "qualified landowners" to begin hunting feral pigs on their land from helicopters, with no bag limit and no fee.



The rules are designed to help cull the number of wild hogs in Texas, which has been rising rapidly ... and are currently estimated at around 2 million.

The Houston Chronicle reports that the rules allow the hunting of coyotes as well as wild hogs from helicopters in accordance with House Bill 716, which was approved by the Texas legislature. Under the terms of the bill, landowners or their agents are able to pay helicopter operators for their services in helping reduce the hog population. All that is required is filing the necessary paperwork. There is no fee associated with the filing.

Texas Department of Agriculture statistics show that a single wild hog can be responsible for as much as $500 in crop damage and other wildlife habitat each year.

I understand that as a general rule of thumb you should eat what you shoot. However, there are exceptions such as wild hogs in Texas and that is why the state allows basically any method of harvesting without a bag limit. As my friend said it is like shooting rats at a dump only much more challenging. Given all this, I don't believe he did anything wrong.
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Old 12-09-2011, 03:28 PM   #13
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Default Cable show on hunting wild boar

There is a show on one of the cable networks that focuses on a family in Texas who hunt the wild boar. They are totally out of control in Texas and causing millions of dollars in damages to farmland. I had no idea! I do remember reading an article a year or so ago about sombody hitting a Russian wild boar on the Mass Pike out past Sturbridge. Neither the driver nor the police immediately knew what type of animal had been involved, but it was biggy. Several hundred pounds and ruined the guy's car.
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Old 12-09-2011, 04:20 PM   #14
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Default Feral Pigs Vs. Wild Boar

Seems they are the same thing, ...Only different. NB

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feral_pigs#Feral_pigs
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Old 12-10-2011, 04:27 AM   #15
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They certainly wouldn't win a beauty contest.
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:53 PM   #16
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I thought I saw one a week ago in Alton on 28 by the cemetery. It wasn't too big but it looked like a Javelina or a REALLY big groundhog. It was also dead. I've never seen them in the woods but I'm told they're around. I'm sure they came from Corbin Park because that's where they appear to be concentrated, and they were once stocked there. I wouldn't think twice about popping one if I'm deer hunting. It'd save me a few hundred in meat and it's all organic. Yum!
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:24 AM   #17
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Texas Department of Agriculture statistics show that a single wild hog can be responsible for as much as $500 in crop damage and other wildlife habitat each year.

Five hundred dollars that's not too bad. What's the big deal.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:44 AM   #18
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Default Corbin Park

http://www.meyette.us/CorbinPark.htm

Here's a website about Corbin Park. I have lived near the park for all of my life. The pigs do get out on occasion, but interestingly enough, often times as a result of people "jacking" the fence to let them out! Although the park itself is very private it makes for a beautiful backdrop of UNDEVELOPED land in the Dartmouth Lake Sunapee region.
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:50 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyfisha View Post
http://www.meyette.us/CorbinPark.htm

Here's a website about Corbin Park. I have lived near the park for all of my life. The pigs do get out on occasion, but interestingly enough, often times as a result of people "jacking" the fence to let them out! Although the park itself is very private it makes for a beautiful backdrop of UNDEVELOPED land in the Dartmouth Lake Sunapee region.
Corbin Park and its members is a hunters country club...I have heard its 40K a year for a membership.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:58 PM   #20
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Flyfisha Did you live near the Quimby's?
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Old 12-18-2011, 06:41 PM   #21
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Went to high school with some but can't remember their first names--It was 40 years ago!!
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:40 PM   #22
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I bet they are tasty
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