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Old 10-20-2017, 03:27 PM   #1
Kayla
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Default Winter Support Braces for Porch

Just wondering if anyone has an easy way to put up (and take down) winter support braces for an RV trailer Florida Room porch. With so many trailers using these braces to protect against roof collapse / snow load ... I figure someone must have come up with a better way to do this.


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Old 10-23-2017, 12:31 PM   #2
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I for one have no clue what your asking but I'm sure that's just me...
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Old 10-23-2017, 03:22 PM   #3
upthesaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpg View Post
I for one have no clue what your asking but I'm sure that's just me...
Eons ago, our place was a 40x8 mobile home with an attached 22x8 porch. When it was closed down for the winter, dad put up some simple 2x4 braces under each ceiling rafter and about midway down the rafter. It wasn't much more than a brace like what you'd use to support sheetrock while installing it on the ceiling. Easy to put up, easy to take down.
A couple of "Florida Room" porches I have seen attached to park model RV's seemed somewhat flimsy to say the least, and not designed to withstand a snow load over the winter. I think that is what he is talking about.
Not sure dad's creation would be doable.

Dave

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Old 10-26-2017, 06:06 PM   #4
Kayla
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Default Winter Support Braces for Porch

Quote:
Originally Posted by dpg View Post
I for one have no clue what your asking but I'm sure that's just me...
DPG, not sure why you would take the time just to reply just to say you have no idea what I'm asking o_O ... But Dave, thanks so much for your response - you were spot on!


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Old 10-27-2017, 05:07 AM   #5
Dad sold the C * C
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A builder friend of ours did similar to what was said above. He had a 2x4 laid down on the floor and had upright 2x4’s (studs) every 3 to 4 feet with another 2x4 along the ceiling.

I think he had rigid insulation between the top 2x4 and the ceiling to protect it a bit and have some give to the structure. Once it's up you mark all the boards for easy setup next year. We used these for years until he decided to put a solid roof over the whole trailer and porch.
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:35 AM   #6
ApS
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Red face A New Hampshire Florida Room Advice from Florida...

I can't answer as to "snow load", but 2x4 bracing was effective in protecting my single-car garage door from collapse during Hurricane Irma's category-4 winds.

A neighbor's similar garage door folded so completely, it appears like a metal box about 5'x5' in size. Hurricane Irma left it sitting in the middle of his garage. His garage also suffered a complete blow-out of the rear wall—traceable directly to his garage door failure.

In your Florida room case—given a presumed 8' width—I'd put 2x4' strengtheners horizontally against the ceiling every 7-feet (given a presumed 22-feet-long roof). Install them running counter to the structural (presumably aluminum) roof panels. Adjust these sizes and lengths if the roof's structure runs the opposite way.

Given a (presumed) 8' ceiling, use two 4x4x8' (upright) posts for each horizontal strengthener. If those vertical posts are too unwieldy to handle, use at least three 2x4x8's, or double-up on them with lag bolts, and use only two. Position the vertical uprights so there's observable pressure upwards against the ceiling.

Given a presumed slope, give the support bias to the downslope edge. (Which would be heavier with wet snow). After setting these up, label the pieces so they can be stored and reapplied in a convenient order next season.

For one person, the horizontal roof strengtheners can be more readily handled by putting one hook at each end of the 2x4x8's, and screw-eyes into the roof's underside. Allow room for each to swivel up 90° for the vertical support braces.

A (presumed) enclosed porch should benefit from a radiant heater directed upwards. While the airspace inside the room would be inadequate to make a temperature difference for comfort, the (presumed) aluminum roof panels might be able to conduct some of that heat to reduce the snow load.

PS: Although a modest 2x4 grid protected my garage door—and it is still upright, it was blown off its roller track completely. The garage's wooden door-frame was torn away. (But, at least, the door itself doesn't match my neighbor's).

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