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Old 08-13-2021, 07:54 AM   #1
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Last edited by Ajd; 09-14-2021 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 08-13-2021, 08:14 AM   #2
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First of all, I dont think this should be legal in any way shape or form... are they going to assess based on today's figures because we are in the middle of a huge real estate value bubble that will undoubtedly pop and inflation is killing us. More taxes more taxes more taxes
Just curious: Would you have the same comment if we were in a real estate value slump and your assessment dropped significantly?

When the higher values across the board are used the tax rate will go down, maybe not as much as we would like.
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Old 08-13-2021, 09:33 AM   #3
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Must remember you don’t have to let them in


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Old 08-13-2021, 09:37 AM   #4
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Default Unintended consequences

New Hampshire, especially the lakes region, has an interesting economy. Having owned property on the big lake and married into a family that's owned two lake front cottages for over a century, I can state that the taxes never go down --and increase steadily. The general attitude is "let's tax the rich summer people from out of state". Lake front property commands a high price and lots of wealthy people are happy to invest in it bulldoze it, and construct their McMansions. This brings the value of my 1940's unheated, uninsulated, wooden cottage (on a nearly unbuildable lot) to a level higher than my modern 6 bedroom home in Ohio.

The only time the taxes went down was when we had the property professionally appraised (using the Town's appraisal firm). After over-ruling some of the appraisal, we did get a reduction in the increase the Town was seeking. This lasted one year; next year, right back up. Fair enough. We sold out (for less that we paid) and are now throwing money at the "family" property.

Now, the "unintended consequences" -- and there are several. First of all, many of the rich out-of-staters care nothing about maintaining the area. Examples include deforestation (just pay the fine), and dumping lots of fertilizer on their lake-adjacent manicured lawns. Locals generally are more concerned with maintaining the lakes and general area.

Those who are wealthy enough to own large McMansions on the lake frequently spend little time there. I know of a couple beautiful new places that would see occupants for a couple weeks each year. Other than taxes, not much money spent locally.

When a large part of an economy relies on out-of-state people dropping their money in the summer, it means that the rest of the economy must take up the slack during the rest of the year, Hence an annual boom-bust cycle that prunes out restaurants, retail, and anything else that can't sustain itself through the lean months.

An insufficient labor force is yet another manifestation of the problem. People tend to want jobs that allow them to live all year long and not just during the tourist season. Relying on college students and imported foreign workers is not an optimal solution, as demonstrated by the many posts on this forum.

The solution would seem to be a transition to "more residents; fewer transients". Certainly keep some tourist trade, leveling it out over the seasons. But encourage year-round residents with their year-round money to spend. Perhaps it's time to abandoned the mythical "no income tax in New Hampshire" [but plenty of property, sales, excise, food, etc., taxes] and develop a balanced tax system. It would be nice if more local people could afford to live year-round on (and near) the lake, rather than reserving these properties for the summer people.

Rant over. I've got to finish packing for tomorrow's trip to the lake. Sorry to see lots of my favorite restaurants are gone. At least Lyons Den and Ellacoya made it though the winter. Also glad Pops has enough workers to remain.
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Old 08-13-2021, 09:51 AM   #5
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Must remember you don’t have to let them in


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I did hear that. But I also heard that if you refuse to let them in, they will assume a figure and go off of that, which will most likely lead to a higher taxes. Just what I heard, idk.
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Old 08-13-2021, 10:08 AM   #6
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Increasing Property values do not increase your taxes. The exception is if your property increases in value more than everyone else in town, then it will have an effect, or vice versa.
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Old 08-13-2021, 10:41 AM   #7
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I was raised in Ohio. Went back a few years ago for a reunion. My take away was I don't want to ever go back again. Real estate prices, I think the average house in Ohio is somewhere in the area of $89,000. I will continue to pass through on my yearly trek to California.
You do not have to let the assessor into your house, however you will have little leverage to combat the assessment. They may just as well decrease the assessment due to condition or increase it if there has been a complete kitchen renovation of $75,000 +/-. When living on Cape Cod some complained of their tax increase. But were told that when 3 years later their taxes would be probably less than the others that had been reassessed since. 1/3 of the properties were reassessed yearly.
Somehow the house in MA has increased in square footage.
As for increasing summer income for business how would the businesses fare if that didn't occur. That small winter income would be yearly.
As for fertilizer many owners are opting for gluten types and I do think that the present fertilizers have discontinued the phosphorous and maybe lowered some nitrogen. I have now tried a product called D.I.O.S. to control weeds etc. It may have enough nitrogen to do the lawn some good.
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Old 08-13-2021, 10:48 AM   #8
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NH Property tax is determined by multiplying the assessment by the town tax rate.

Check your town website (assessor) for the tax rate.
Example: Moultonborough

Year 2020
Town: 2.11
County: 1.15
School: 2.09
State Ed.: 1.78

Total: 7.13 tax rate


Your current assessment can probably be found on your town website , as well. If your town has tax/gis map, go there and plug-in your address in the search box. Click on your site, then click on the Documents and links, then click on property card, and assessment is there.
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Old 08-13-2021, 11:15 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Crusty View Post
New Hampshire, especially the lakes region, has an interesting economy. Having owned property on the big lake and married into a family that's owned two lake front cottages for over a century, I can state that the taxes never go down --and increase steadily. The general attitude is "let's tax the rich summer people from out of state". Lake front property commands a high price and lots of wealthy people are happy to invest in it bulldoze it, and construct their McMansions. This brings the value of my 1940's unheated, uninsulated, wooden cottage (on a nearly unbuildable lot) to a level higher than my modern 6 bedroom home in Ohio.

The only time the taxes went down was when we had the property professionally appraised (using the Town's appraisal firm). After over-ruling some of the appraisal, we did get a reduction in the increase the Town was seeking. This lasted one year; next year, right back up. Fair enough. We sold out (for less that we paid) and are now throwing money at the "family" property.

Now, the "unintended consequences" -- and there are several. First of all, many of the rich out-of-staters care nothing about maintaining the area. Examples include deforestation (just pay the fine), and dumping lots of fertilizer on their lake-adjacent manicured lawns. Locals generally are more concerned with maintaining the lakes and general area.

Those who are wealthy enough to own large McMansions on the lake frequently spend little time there. I know of a couple beautiful new places that would see occupants for a couple weeks each year. Other than taxes, not much money spent locally.

When a large part of an economy relies on out-of-state people dropping their money in the summer, it means that the rest of the economy must take up the slack during the rest of the year, Hence an annual boom-bust cycle that prunes out restaurants, retail, and anything else that can't sustain itself through the lean months.

An insufficient labor force is yet another manifestation of the problem. People tend to want jobs that allow them to live all year long and not just during the tourist season. Relying on college students and imported foreign workers is not an optimal solution, as demonstrated by the many posts on this forum.

The solution would seem to be a transition to "more residents; fewer transients". Certainly keep some tourist trade, leveling it out over the seasons. But encourage year-round residents with their year-round money to spend. Perhaps it's time to abandoned the mythical "no income tax in New Hampshire" [but plenty of property, sales, excise, food, etc., taxes] and develop a balanced tax system. It would be nice if more local people could afford to live year-round on (and near) the lake, rather than reserving these properties for the summer people.

Rant over. I've got to finish packing for tomorrow's trip to the lake. Sorry to see lots of my favorite restaurants are gone. At least Lyons Den and Ellacoya made it though the winter. Also glad Pops has enough workers to remain.
This describes almost every vacation area in the country.
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Old 08-13-2021, 01:48 PM   #10
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Default California's Prop. 13

Maximum of 1.3% of the cash selling price with slight annual increase allowances. Value goes up or down, doesn't matter. I know CA makes up for this in MANY other ways.

I still don't think any Govt. entity should be allowed to control the demographics of it's populace by pricing people out of their homes....

When the town leaders get tired of their great unwashed, increase taxes and get the better bathed!

The current value of homes in NH has increased all-across-the-board. An $85,000 shack, valued a few years ago, is worth a lot more today.
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Old 08-13-2021, 02:09 PM   #11
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First of all, I dont think this should be legal in any way shape or form... are they going to assess based on today's figures because we are in the middle of a huge real estate value bubble that will undoubtedly pop and inflation is killing us. More taxes more taxes more taxes
If you had a basic understanding of how your tax bill is calculated, you would not be alarmed.

If everyone's assessment went up by, say the same 20%, no final tax bill would change as ITD noted.

The amount raised by taxes it determined my Town and School district votes, not by the total valuation of properties in town.

Alan
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Old 08-13-2021, 02:48 PM   #12
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Wolfeboro town website:

WHAT IS THE TAX RATE?
The New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration is charged with the task of computing and establishing the tax rate for each town, city, or unincorporated place, in accordance with RSA 21-J:3. The 2020 tax rate has been set at $13.01 per thousand of assessed valuation. A breakdown of the rate is as follows:

Municipal $5.26
Local School $4.82
State School $1.82
County $1.11

$13.01 Total Tax Rate

Properties located within the Lower Beech Pond Village District pay an additional $ .00 per thousand for the village district.

Property taxes are billed semi-annually in Wolfeboro. The first bill each year is based on one-half of the previous year’s tax. If there has been a change in the assessed valuation of the property since the previous bill was issued, the bill is based on the new appraisal. This tax bill is usually mailed out near the end of May and due the first week of July. (Specific due date may vary from year to year as it is contingent upon the date of mailing.)


The tax rate is set in the fall of each year then the final bill is calculated. The second bill uses the new tax rate multiplied by the property’s assessed value less any payments made on the first bill. This tax bill is usually mailed out near the end of October and due the first week of December. (Again, specific due dates may vary.)

Both tax bills are subject to interest at 8% per annum on amounts not paid by the specified due dates.



2021 Cyclical Review

Assessing office is starting 2021 cyclical review of town properties in preparation for the 2024 town wide revaluation. This requires a visit to roughly 25% of properties each year, over the next 4 years. We will be checking for accurate building measurements and reviewing relevant descriptive date. This year 1562 parcels will be visited by our assessing firm Granite Hill Municipal Services this will start immediately.

Maps Included: 1-3, 5, 6, 8, 9,11, 12, 14-21, 23-27, 29, 30, 31, 33-38, 41, 43-47, 49, 50, 52, 54, 57-63, 66, 67, 69, 71-74, 76-139, 143-151, 159, 161, & 164
My input: if you have ten acres or more, look into filing "current use". Very reduced statutory rate.

Again ... town tax = tax rate X assessment
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Old 08-13-2021, 04:42 PM   #13
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My input: if you have ten acres or more, look into filing "current use". Very reduced statutory rate.

Again ... town tax = tax rate X assessment
Don't forget in your simple formula that the tax rate is per $1000 of valuation. Thus the formula is off a little.

That said, assessing isn't an exact science. However, things happen that even the assessors cannot explain, like in the case of Moultonborough last year they changed the depreciation tables drastically and with no explanation as to why.

And then you get to the various boards that budget and spend money. Not a lot of business acumen being expended on trying to manage conservatively, especially in towns with property tax rich lakefront. Tax and spend is alive here as well.
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Old 08-13-2021, 04:59 PM   #14
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Don't forget in your simple formula that the tax rate is per $1000 of valuation. Thus the formula is off a little.
I stand corrected.
It is tax rate per 1000.

numerical tax rate/1000 X assessment = tax
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:20 PM   #15
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I did hear that. But I also heard that if you refuse to let them in, they will assume a figure and go off of that, which will most likely lead to a higher taxes. Just what I heard, idk.
Yes. You would then need to go through the process to get that assessment corrected... and that would require the entry into your home.
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:30 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by garysanfran View Post
Maximum of 1.3% of the cash selling price with slight annual increase allowances. Value goes up or down, doesn't matter. I know CA makes up for this in MANY other ways.

I still don't think any Govt. entity should be allowed to control the demographics of it's populace by pricing people out of their homes....

When the town leaders get tired of their great unwashed, increase taxes and get the better bathed!

The current value of homes in NH has increased all-across-the-board. An $85,000 shack, valued a few years ago, is worth a lot more today.
Doesn't work... we have been using our property tax system for centuries. The assessment every five years is an original article of our State Constitution. We aren't any better bathed.

Our household size has dropped, and our house square footage has increased. If we had built the same size as we did in the 1940s, or even smaller to adjust to the lower number of people in the household... our assessment would be relatively lower.
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:35 PM   #17
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First of all, I dont think this should be legal in any way shape or form... are they going to assess based on today's figures because we are in the middle of a huge real estate value bubble that will undoubtedly pop and inflation is killing us. More taxes more taxes more taxes
An increase in property values has ZERO direct correlation to an increase in property taxes. The town determines its budget, and then imposes a tax rate based on property values to equate to the budget. If everyone’s property value goes up by the same percentage and the budget stays the same, property taxes for everyone stay the same. The only way your property taxes go up is if your assessment is increased disproportionately to others in the town, or if the town’s budget increases. Property values and assessments have nothing to do with “more taxes more taxes more taxes.” More taxes come about because your elected representatives increase the town’s budget and that gets spread around based on assessed values.
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:43 PM   #18
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Assessments:
A S S E S S I N G S TA N D A R D S B OA R D
Reference Manual for Selectmen,Assessors,and Taxpayers

Understanding NH Property Taxes
T H E O F F I C I A L N E W H A M P S H I R E A S S E S S I N G
R E F E R E N C E M A N U A L

https://www.revenue.nh.gov/mun-prop/...asb-manual.pdf

Also,
How much sympathy is there for the crazy property values and limited inventory! A Moultonborough property from the neighborhood I left three years ago (all are public documents).

On Long Island in Moultonborough in my former neighborhood:

Sold on 05/17/2018 for $347,000 per town records; Registry of d Deeds Book 3388 Page 242. So that there is no semantics issue:
tax stamp value = $15/$1000 of sales price
Carroll County registry of deeds: real estate transfer tax stamp for this property: $5205 at $15/$1000 sales price, then, this property sold in 2018: 5205000/15 = $347,000


Same property with some limited upgrades sold in 5 days in 2021 for $689,000
Asking price was $650,000 which I thought at the time was crazy!
https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/.../pid_41884556/

Same property Sold 08/02/2021
Carroll county registry of deeds : Book 3606 Page 498; tax stamp:$10,335
$10,335 = $15/$1000 x sales price
or sales price = $10,335 x $1000/$15 = $689,000

Or ,
$10,335 = $.015 x where x is sales price; $10,335/$.015 = $689,000

How is an assessor going to handle this!

All property values have gone up, for whatever reasons, we are all familiar with. Maybe it is not assessments that should attacked, but tax rates, and how they come about!
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Old 08-13-2021, 08:44 PM   #19
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An increase in property values has ZERO direct correlation to an increase in property taxes. The town determines its budget, and then imposes a tax rate based on property values to equate to the budget. If everyone’s property value goes up by the same percentage and the budget stays the same, property taxes for everyone stay the same. The only way your property taxes go up is if your assessment is increased disproportionately to others in the town, or if the town’s budget increases. Property values and assessments have nothing to do with “more taxes more taxes more taxes.” More taxes come about because your elected representatives increase the town’s budget and that gets spread around based on assessed values.
A town's budget is directly voted on.
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Old 08-13-2021, 08:49 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by longislander View Post
Assessments:
A S S E S S I N G S TA N D A R D S B OA R D
Reference Manual for Selectmen,Assessors,and Taxpayers

Understanding NH Property Taxes
T H E O F F I C I A L N E W H A M P S H I R E A S S E S S I N G
R E F E R E N C E M A N U A L

https://www.revenue.nh.gov/mun-prop/...asb-manual.pdf

Also,
How much sympathy is there for the crazy property values and limited inventory! A Moultonborough property from the neighborhood I left three years ago (all are public documents).

On Long Island in Moultonborough in my former neighborhood:

Sold on 05/17/2018 for $347,000 per town records; Registry of d Deeds Book 3388 Page 242. So that there is no semantics issue:
tax stamp value = $15/$1000 of sales price
Carroll County registry of deeds: real estate transfer tax stamp for this property: $5205 at $15/$1000 sales price, then, this property sold in 2018: 5205000/15 = $347,000


Same property with some limited upgrades sold in 5 days in 2021 for $689,000
Asking price was $650,000 which I thought at the time was crazy!
https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/.../pid_41884556/

Same property Sold 08/02/2021
Carroll county registry of deeds : Book 3606 Page 498; tax stamp:$10,335
$10,335 = $15/$1000 x sales price
or sales price = $10,335 x $1000/$15 = $689,000

Or ,
$10,335 = $.015 x where x is sales price; $10,335/$.015 = $689,000

How is an assessor going to handle this!

All property values have gone up, for whatever reasons, we are all familiar with. Maybe it is not assessments that should attacked, but tax rates, and how they come about!
The tax rates come about by the voter of Moultonborough adopting a budget, and the budget being divided by the total assessment rate, that number gets added to the county rate - done in the same manner on a county wide scale (adjusted for variation in assessing cycles for each municipality in the county), and added to the State education rate... which, since it is not collected and redistributed, is really more of an accounting gimmick to make the local school rate seem lower.

The bottom line will always be the voting at town meetings.
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Old 08-14-2021, 08:32 AM   #21
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The tax rates come about by the voter of Moultonborough adopting a budget, and the budget being divided by the total assessment rate, that number gets added to the county rate - done in the same manner on a county wide scale (adjusted for variation in assessing cycles for each municipality in the county), and added to the State education rate... which, since it is not collected and redistributed, is really more of an accounting gimmick to make the local school rate seem lower.

The bottom line will always be the voting at town meetings.
What bottom line?
The town doesn't vote on the county budget, nor School Ed. (not local school).

The voters don't decide the vote on the county budget, the county delegation does.

If you think the State Ed. rate is a gimmick to the local school rate then are you familiar with the "Claremont decisions" by the NH Supreme Court and towns like Moultonborough required to be "donor towns" because of the decisions? Apparently not. I can assure you Moultonborough, and other donor towns, don't think it is a gimmick, but an abomination and a rip-off.

Using Moultonborough as an example:

The town budget is a warrant article in the warrant that is a "rubber stamp" of a vote. Most folks have never gone to the public hearings before town meeting to discuss, and don't have a clue on the warrant article vote.

The local school budget is not approved at the annual town meeting, but at the annual school district meeting. Usually different attendance, as most aren't as concerned about the local school budget, for some reason.

https://www.moultonboroughnh.gov/sit...signatures.pdf

Statutorily, the town Annual Reports come out prior to town meeting and are available at town meeting. The annual report has a detail by line items of the current proposed budget and the last budget.

https://www.moultonboroughnh.gov/sit...rt_for_web.pdf

Floor motions can be made to change amounts in the warrant article, including to zero, as some of us have done. Statutorily, no new adds (warrant already published, and articles need prior notice/ publication in the warrant).

Bottom line is .... try not paying the tax.
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Old 08-14-2021, 09:38 AM   #22
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To me there are two issues one the amount of taxes one has to pay and two relative fairness. I lived in the Bay area many years ago and my house was taxed much higher than my neighbors for the same house due to the tax base set by last selling price. By now since the prop was 1978 there is huge disparity between what houses are taxed
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Old 08-14-2021, 11:19 AM   #23
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I think I explained county rate and State Education rate in my post. I shouldn't have to reexplain it.

It since there has been no ''donor town'' since the first Lynch Administration, really not an issue for those paying attention.

And what you are describing for the local town and school, is by all means a town vote process... not a State Legislative process.


Bottom line is you agreed to the system when you purchased property in NH, since the State Constitution was not recently ratified and no one on this forum was here before 1784.
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Old 08-14-2021, 12:05 PM   #24
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This morning on two instances I was behind cars from DC with license plates that read...Taxation without Representation".......which is what the Mayor of Dc and some others are bitching about. And she is trying to get Congress to make DC a state...God forbid !! But it struck a chord....here in the lakes region lots of property owners are paying the tax bills without any representation. They cannot vote. A simple solution is to have a special voters list for just town, school, and town meeting business. Will never happen, as the "voting" residents will not allow others to have a say. Just pay..!
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Old 08-14-2021, 12:50 PM   #25
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I think I explained county rate and State Education rate in my post. I shouldn't have to reexplain it.
No need for your interpretation.

Quote:
It since there has been no ''donor town'' since the first Lynch Administration, really not an issue for those paying attention.
Wrong.

May 20, 2021 — Officials say return to donor-receiver formula would be a 'failed ... rejected the donor town system in 2011 and should do so again now,” ...

https://www.wmur.com/article/nh-prim...akers/36492595

Quote:
And what you are describing for the local town and school, is by all means a town vote process... not a State Legislative process.
I stated those two were town resident votes. County and school ed. are not. No need to commingle, for confusion.


Quote:
Bottom line is you agreed to the system when you purchased property in NH, since the State Constitution was not recently ratified and no one on this forum was here before 1784.

I knew in 1974 when I bought my first property that I had to pay taxes to Moultonborough. When I became a resident in 1996 I knew I could now, vote on town issues. Also knew/know non-residents cannot legally vote. Moultonborough taxpayers pay much less than most other towns, even with crazy sales and assessments, and I'm very happy about that fact ... not conjecture.

The constitution became effective June 2, 1784, when it replaced the state's constitution of 1776. So what?

Are you trying to point out:
State Constitution - Form of Government
Part 2, Form of Government, New Hampshire State Constitution.
[Art.] 5. [Power to Make Laws, Elect Officers, Define Their Powers and Duties, Impose Fines and Assess Taxes; Prohibited from Authorizing Towns to Aid Certain Corporations.]

On January 5, 1776, the Congress of New Hampshire voted in Exeter to establish a civil government, and specified the manner and form that government would have. The Congress ratified the Constitution at the urging of the Continental Congress. The 1776 Constitution did not contain a Bill of Rights, nor was it submitted to the people of New Hampshire. The constitution was the first constitution ever ratified by an American commonwealth.


I'll repeat the bottom line ... try not paying your taxes ... resident or not!
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Old 08-14-2021, 02:05 PM   #26
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https://reachinghighernh.org/2019/02...-locally-kept/
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Old 08-14-2021, 02:12 PM   #27
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2021 is after 2019

https://reachinghighernh.org/2021/06...ed-properties/
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Old 08-14-2021, 02:57 PM   #28
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Redistribution of SWEPT was ended in the 2005 HB2 trailer to the 2005 HB1 Budget bill.

In 2011, under Lynch-O'Brien, the law was changed again to place a HARD CAP on the fund.

You can find that on NH Transparency or within the bills themselves.
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Old 08-14-2021, 03:45 PM   #29
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You can find that on NH Transparency or within the bills themselves.
Why don't you post links to what you think you see?

Quote:
Redistribution of SWEPT was ended in the 2005 HB2 trailer to the 2005 HB1 Budget bill.
Why go to 2005 bills for present budgets?

2005 HB2
http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/legi...05/HB0002.html

Is this your argument? You do realize bills/laws do change over time?

Also, is this what you mean by Transparency?
https://www.nh.gov/transparentnh/

How do you explain the following, and much more?

"The New Hampshire state budget for 2022-2023 replaces a targeted property tax relief fund with a $100 million cut to the statewide education property tax (SWEPT). SWEPT, a state tax that is retained locally by towns and cities, offsets the amount of funding that they receive from the New Hampshire Department of Education for their public schools."

https://reachinghighernh.org/2021/06...ed-properties/

"But the question over how to structure the tax, known as SWEPT, continues to fuel debates in New Hampshire."

https://newhampshirebulletin.com/202...ding-solution/

No offense, I'm done with this thread.
Dealing with 2021 and moving forward is tough enough.
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Old 08-14-2021, 04:44 PM   #30
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You posted it yourself..."SWEPT, a state tax that is retained locally by towns and cities". It isn't collected by the State and redistributed, it is a gimmick in the funding used as an offset to what the State must provide.

You made my case.
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Old 08-14-2021, 05:31 PM   #31
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Quote:
Redistribution of SWEPT was ended in the 2005 HB2 trailer to the 2005 HB1 Budget bill.
Quote:
"SWEPT, a state tax that is retained locally by towns and cities"
Quote:
You made my case.
The only case you've made is what can stick on a wall and see what happens.

Join Date: Jun 2021

A day in infamy!
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Old 08-14-2021, 05:44 PM   #32
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And it isn't the date that you chose to purchase property in NH?

SWEPT isn't redistributed and has a hard cap...
What the voters in each town and school district decide among themselves is not a State level issue.

If you are unhappy with your property taxes - and most everyone is regardless of the amount - attend and vote the meetings.

If you're not a resident of NH... sorry, I don't see a future that option exists in.
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Old 08-14-2021, 06:56 PM   #33
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Quote:
And it isn't the date that you chose to purchase property in NH?

SWEPT isn't redistributed and has a hard cap...
What the voters in each town and school district decide among themselves is not a State level issue.

If you are unhappy with your property taxes - and most everyone is regardless of the amount - attend and vote the meetings.

If you're not a resident of NH... sorry, I don't see a future that option exists in.
"But the question over how to structure the tax, known as SWEPT, continues to fuel debates in New Hampshire."

https://newhampshirebulletin.com/202...ding-solution/

What part of that is difficult to comprehend?

The original issue was the four rates of the the town tax, and that the state School Ed. and County were not, and are not voted on by the town voters. That is still fact, no matter how much is tried to be "swept" aside.

Quote:
If you are unhappy with your property taxes - and most everyone is regardless of the amount - attend and vote the meetings.
Looks like you swept this aside:

Quote:
I knew in 1974 when I bought my first property that I had to pay taxes to Moultonborough. When I became a resident in 1996 I knew I could now, vote on town issues. Also knew/know non-residents cannot legally vote. Moultonborough taxpayers pay much less than most other towns, even with crazy sales and assessments, and I'm very happy about that fact ... not conjecture.

I also attend every Moultonborough Select Board business meeting, and annual town meeting, and annual school district meeting. Do you? I'm still not unhappy with Moultonborough taxes; quite the opposite. You can read?

Quote:
If you're not a resident of NH... sorry, I don't see a future that option exists in.
Quote:
When I became a resident in 1996 ...
Might I suggest this for apparent skills, or lack thereof:

https://www.nhti.edu/course/reading-comprehension/
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Old 08-14-2021, 07:44 PM   #34
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I read extremely well, but realized that you are not the only reader.

And since you attend, you must realize that as adults, we do not always get our way... sometimes we must bend to the will of the majority.
If I couldn't accept that, I would simply move.
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Old 08-14-2021, 07:56 PM   #35
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Have a nice trip and Godspeed!
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Old 08-14-2021, 09:48 PM   #36
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I'm not leaving. I am not upset with the situation.
I have never felt the property tax unfair, nor have I ever expected that the town voting... or any voting for that matter... would always go my way.
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