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Old 12-16-2015, 10:08 PM   #1
winterh
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Default matching stain in an old cabin

I am doing some work to my cottage. The walls are stained knotty pine and over the years have acquired a great patina. There are areas where I need to replace existing boards and i have tried to match with stains and even tried mixing but I just can't get it close. The old pine has such a nice aged look but filling in an area with new pine will really stand out. Does anyone know a way to get the right shade. Matching paint is easy but the paint store tells me matching stain on old boards is tough.
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Old 12-16-2015, 10:19 PM   #2
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I've done it lots of times, it's just kind of trial and error. I'll get a base of colors- reddish tints, light oak, antique, etc. and just mix until I get what I want. I always end up with too much, because you have to overshoot the mix, no way you want to try and match it twice if you run out of the first batch
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:58 AM   #3
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You won't get it perfect close maybe, but not perfect. At best you'll notice it because you'll know it's there.
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Old 12-17-2015, 03:36 PM   #4
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Brk-int is correct for a one time shot at matching, but this is what I have done with wood trim and some cabinets.

What I do is set out a piece of scrap of the new wood and mark it off with a sharpie or just a score mark. Lay out a piece of paper with the same number of blocks. Number each section of the wood with pencil.

Then measure what you use for each test and write it down. This will get you close and mostly reproducible results. I use an tea spoon or similar and just keep track of "parts per total". Time consuming, but works.

Also, sealing the wood or not sealing it before stain makes a difference.

Good luck, enjoy the process as much as the results
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Old 12-17-2015, 03:44 PM   #5
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dpg you got it right. The problem is me. No one else would notice the difference but I know its there so it screams at me like I painted it a neon color!
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Old 12-17-2015, 11:08 PM   #6
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You will also have problems with the wood itself, as the old pine is a much denser and heavier wood than today's faster growth trees.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:29 AM   #7
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Yes, it will scream at you for awhile, but I'm always surprised at how quickly the new boards darken and blend in, especially if they are in an area where the sun hits them.

That said, I've found that a very light coat of Minwax Puritan Pine stain comes close to naturally aged pine. Wipe it off quickly. As above, it won't be perfect at first but it will age quickly.
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Old 12-18-2015, 01:43 PM   #8
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I am a long time "lurker" on the forum, finally inspired to register since I might have something to contribute on this topic (and I have benefited from many recommendations I have found here over the years). I am in the middle of a similar project, trying to match some molding to an aged knotty pine room. After a year of experimenting with different products -- linseed oil, danish oil, etc. -- I brought a piece of the old pine to Johnson Paint in Wolfeboro. Dale pointed me to a mix of Old Masters gel stains (she has a great eye for this stuff) -- in my case it was one part Puritan, one part Fruitwood, and a dab (starting with about 1/8 of a teaspoon) of Maple. You obviously need to experiment on scrap wood to get it just right, and the age of the wood may make a difference -- mine was unstained, installed about 13 years ago, so the stain is to match the natural aging (and in my case, it's molding, so if it's a bit off, only I will notice it, so it's easier than actual wall pieces). I am pretty happy with the result so far.

Good luck!
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Old 12-19-2015, 12:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winterh View Post
The walls are stained knotty pine and over the years have acquired a great patina. There are areas where I need to replace existing boards and i have tried to match with stains and even tried mixing but I just can't get it close. The old pine has such a nice aged look but filling in an area with new pine will really stand out. Does anyone know a way to get the right shade. Matching paint is easy but the paint store tells me matching stain on old boards is tough.
Staining boards to match is difficult, as none is exactly like its neighbors. I've tried to do it with a thin water-based stain, but am unhappy with the results. Depending of any finish remaining on your boards, you may not have the option of sanding each board in place. Consider removing each board on the one wall that doesn't match.

Our interior—which you've seen—is knotty pine entirely...and after 60 years has turned dark. Each board was nailed with wire brads. (I know, because I was there, helping. I've thought of carefully removing every board, and removing the old Minwax finish by running each board through an electric planer. The boards can be removed by punching the brads all the way through—then before re-nailing them in place, filling the holes with a light grade of filler—like Plastic Wood®.

There is a water-based varnish available which might keep the original bright finish. I've used it with very good effect on Cypress. (Water clean-up, and easy to work with).


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Old 12-20-2015, 05:15 PM   #10
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Like APS, I have punched the nails through with a pin punch to remove old pine boards. In my case, i was able to replace the boards with some from another area of the house where we had also removed boards but did not need them again. Maybe there is a place where you can remove some older boards and use them in the more visible sections and then stain newer wood for installation in less obvious spots. Using a small pin punch drives the nails into the 2X4's in he wall framing and leaves no mess. If it is young and groove, you can remove the nails in a few boards and then bow them out in the middle...they will come out. I have even retailed in he old holes.
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Old 12-20-2015, 10:23 PM   #11
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I'm gonna mostly agree and slightly disagree with what's been said. The agreeing part: you won't get it exactly right, but no on but you will notice - and as years go by they will get more and more alike. The disagreeing part: IMHO anything other than boring ol' oil stain is not worth messing with. I really love modern paints and clear finishes, but current water-based and gel- stains just don't work predictably for me. YMMV, of course.

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