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Old 01-22-2008, 02:58 PM   #1
Lakegeezer
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Default Towing a Snowmobile

A few weeks ago, one of my sledding buds had a breakdown. It was way back in the mountains, half-way up a very steep trail. He is mechanically inclined and limped it back home, but we got to wondering, "how do you retrieve a broken snowmobile". One approach, I've heard, is to use a rope, remove the drive belt of the broken sled and tow it with another sled. Has anyone tried this? What are the limits? Can you go up steep hills? Does it put undue wear on the towing sled? Are there SeaTow like services you can call to do the tow? SnoTow??
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:57 PM   #2
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Post Towing a snowmobile....

Nope, no "snow tow" out in the boondocks!

There are several methods to tow. The best way is to remove the drive belt from the disabled sled and then use what is known as a three point tow rope. These are available on-line or at any parts or dealer store for usually ten bucks on up. When travelling flat terrain or going up hills, it is pretty straightforward. The problem comes getting a disabled sled down a steep hill. What you do then is simply hook the disabled sled up in front of the tow sled and let the tow sled brake the disabled sled downhill.

Towing can put a strain on the sled donig the towing, but sometimes you have to make do.

In an emergency, a spare drive belt or the drive belt from the disabled sled can be used as a temporary tow strap. I actually saw two Fish & Game officers using this method to tow one of their disabled State sleds this past weekend up in North Conway.

You can read some important SAFETY TIPS here, it is from a course that I teach in refeence to snowmobile safety.
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Old 01-23-2008, 03:34 PM   #3
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Thanks Skip,

On a short distance tow, usually there is enough drag in the sled being towed at low speed
so as descending most grades is not a problem. In a situation where braking would be required,
just put a rider on the sled being towed to apply braking as needed.

A hitch and tow bar system works well if you don't have anyone with you.
If the track won't turn due to a broken chain case or a seized bearing on the track shaft,
an old car hood turned upside down can be used.

This system works great; http://www.buddytow.com/movies/buddytow-video.wmv


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Always Remember, The Best Safety Device In The Boat, or on a PWC Snowmobile etc., Is YOU!

Safe sledding tips and much more; http://www.snowmobile.org/snowmobiling-safety.html
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Old 01-25-2008, 01:31 AM   #4
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For long towing of your sled.(broken) Turn you ski's around faceing back. Left front on right facing back. Right front on left facing back. Cut down two trees about 3inches thick and 12feet long. put small end in ski loop (front of ski).
Cross them under track and put them on rear seat of sled doing the towing. (put blanket between trees and seat of towing sled. (so seat is not damage).

Tie them to towing sled rear bumper and loop of ski's, (sled being towed). You can tow sled at 45 miles and hour and if track was damage it will be off ground and no need to have some one to work the brake of broken down sled.

Tow sled in Canada like this for over 150 miles way up north.
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Old 01-25-2008, 07:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eye spy View Post
For long towing of your sled.(broken) Turn you ski's around faceing back. Left front on right facing back. Right front on left facing back. Cut down two trees about 3inches thick and 12feet long. put small end in ski loop (front of ski).
Cross them under track and put them on rear seat of sled doing the towing. (put blanket between trees and seat of towing sled. (so seat is not damage).

Tie them to towing sled rear bumper and loop of ski's, (sled being towed). You can tow sled at 45 miles and hour and if track was damage it will be off ground and no need to have some one to work the brake of broken down sled.

Tow sled in Canada like this for over 150 miles way up north.
I wouldn't suggest cutting down any trees, (hefty fines), however there are enough dead branches already down that can be used. I used one put through the ski loops and secured it to my rear bumper with a spare starter rope to tow a sled in.

Other than cutting down trees, Good idea.
Regards,
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Always Remember, The Best Safety Device In The Boat, or on a PWC Snowmobile etc., Is YOU!

Safe sledding tips and much more; http://www.snowmobile.org/snowmobiling-safety.html
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