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Old 04-05-2016, 08:28 AM   #1
Old Sarge
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Default Boat fail confessions!

Nobody’s perfect and sometimes you have to learn the hard way! I was reading a post the other day about people getting out of their boat to go swimming without anchoring or leaving someone in the boat and having to try to catch up to their boat when it gets blown away from them in a gust of wind! We have all heard about people forgetting to put the plug in or setting their parking brake when launching their boats. I thought it might be interesting to hear a few other boat fail confessions! So I will go first!

Back in the 90’s I was living in Plymouth, New Hampshire and thought it would be nice to spend a day on Squam Lake. “On Gold Pond” was really popular then and I thought it would be cool to see some of the sights from the movie!

Even though I was a complete novice, I was able to rent a 20’ pontoon boat equipped with a new Honda four stroke outboard. There was no boater education requirement back then and all you needed was a driver’s license. The man at the counter who rented me the boat handed me a paper map and told me to go south and west from the red markers and north and east from the black markers and off I went with the wife, our two children and my mother and our dog!

We got off to a slow start as the engine kept dying until I realized you had to open the air release valve on the gas tank! Then we were off and traveled through the channel from “Little Squam” out on to “Big Squam”.

We had a great day and made it around the whole lake and I was pretty pleased myself and started heading for the channel back to “Little Squam”. I could see the channel entrance and thought we were home free and had the engine wide open. All of a sudden I realized we were approaching a marker and before I could decide east or west, north or south, we past it! We did not get three feet past that marker before we felt the stern rise up as we hit a ledge and the lower unit dragged over it!

There we were dead in the water. Luckily I had a cell phone and even though we had one reception bar, it was enough to get us in contact with the place we rented the boat from. The guy asked where we were and I mentioned we had been coming in and could see the channel and the guy said “Oh, I know where you’re at!” so I am sure we were not the first people to hit that ledge!

We waited a half an hour and here he comes in a little skiff with a small outboard with a tiller arm! He hooked up to us and towed us through the channel. If anyone has been on Squam you know there is a lot of traffic in that channel and every time we passed a boat people were smiling, obviously knowing what had happened. It was like doing the walk of shame!

It didn’t get any better once we got back to the counter and the man said “That will be twelve hundred dollars, sir. Shall I put it on your Visa or American Express?”! It doesn’t seem like much now but back then twelve hundred bucks was quite a lot of money, especially to me!

The story does end well though! No one got hurt (except for my pride) and my homeowners insurance paid to repair the engine!

So who's next!

Last edited by Old Sarge; 04-05-2016 at 09:14 AM.
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:13 AM   #2
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Smile Boat Fail Confessions

Only one word explains it all GRAVEYARD!
Like a total buffoon not paying enough attention to the red and blacks, the lower unit caressed the Granite States best at about 10 MPH.
I was so annoyed that I had just lost a Mirage Prop that H&H had the week before trued and balanced. I was going to jump in and get it but the amount of gear lube sitting on the surface said it all. Chief Thundercloud (Bride) who really enjoys the Donzi was fried! Got towed to Lanes End where I rescued the boat by trailer and brought it to the best on the lake, The Ewings! The rest as they say is (hard learned) history.
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Old 04-05-2016, 10:02 AM   #3
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I have been lucky prior to this season. Last season I had 2 incidents where I was "that" guy both in the same day. Memorial day weekend trying to fuel up with 100 other people waiting, we put in about 140$ worth of gas and then the boat wouldn't start. Dead in the water, starter was shot with everyone waiting.

Then after getting a ride to my house luckily just around the corner to get the truck and trailer, I tried to tow it out with my Wrangler which cant tow worth a damn and couldn't even make it up the ramp where more people were clearly waiting.

Learned two things that day, although I know the Wrangler is a useless tow vehicle, I thought towing it 1,000 feet for service would be fine and that diagnosing electrical problems on the fly is not my strong suit.
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Old 04-05-2016, 10:43 AM   #4
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Nobody’s perfect and sometimes you have to learn the hard way! I was reading a post the other day about people getting out of their boat to go swimming without anchoring or leaving someone in the boat and having to try to catch up to their boat when it gets blown away from them in a gust of wind! We have all heard about people forgetting to put the plug in or setting their parking brake when launching their boats. I thought it might be interesting to hear a few other boat fail confessions! So I will go first!

Back in the 90’s I was living in Plymouth, New Hampshire and thought it would be nice to spend a day on Squam Lake. “On Gold Pond” was really popular then and I thought it would be cool to see some of the sights from the movie!

Even though I was a complete novice, I was able to rent a 20’ pontoon boat equipped with a new Honda four stroke outboard. There was no boater education requirement back then and all you needed was a driver’s license. The man at the counter who rented me the boat handed me a paper map and told me to go south and west from the red markers and north and east from the black markers and off I went with the wife, our two children and my mother and our dog!

We got off to a slow start as the engine kept dying until I realized you had to open the air release valve on the gas tank! Then we were off and traveled through the channel from “Little Squam” out on to “Big Squam”.

We had a great day and made it around the whole lake and I was pretty pleased myself and started heading for the channel back to “Little Squam”. I could see the channel entrance and thought we were home free and had the engine wide open. All of a sudden I realized we were approaching a marker and before I could decide east or west, north or south, we past it! We did not get three feet past that marker before we felt the stern rise up as we hit a ledge and the lower unit dragged over it!

There we were dead in the water. Luckily I had a cell phone and even though we had one reception bar, it was enough to get us in contact with the place we rented the boat from. The guy asked where we were and I mentioned we had been coming in and could see the channel and the guy said “Oh, I know where you’re at!” so I am sure we were not the first people to hit that ledge!

We waited a half an hour and here he comes in a little skiff with a small outboard with a tiller arm! He hooked up to us and towed us through the channel. If anyone has been on Squam you know there is a lot of traffic in that channel and every time we passed a boat people were smiling, obviously knowing what had happened. It was like doing the walk of shame!

It didn’t get any better once we got back to the counter and the man said “That will be twelve hundred dollars, sir. Shall I put it on your Visa or American Express?”! It doesn’t seem like much now but back then twelve hundred bucks was quite a lot of money, especially to me!

The story does end well though! No one got hurt (except for my pride) and my homeowners insurance paid to repair the engine!

So who's next!
Home owners paid for the repair?? I've never heard of that
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Old 04-05-2016, 11:20 AM   #5
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Yes, believe or not my Allstate Homeowner's paid (well they reimbursed me). It had to be a rental and the boat had to be under 25 hp and a under certain length. I was very happy!

Donzi Minx---- Chief Thundercloud---Funny!!!
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Old 04-05-2016, 11:49 AM   #6
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Smile Boat Fail Confessions

Yeah, 35 years of Bliss with good ole Chief Thundercloud. All of my adolescent behaviors (I really should have been locked up) got fine tuned by her, and I do love her dearly, but man does she hate that Donzi!
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Old 04-05-2016, 12:27 PM   #7
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Default The Witches....

It was early Spring, 1974. My father had just taken delivery of his first-ever new boat...a 1974 Wellcraft 18' bowrider. It was literally our first time ever on the lake in a boat. We had passed through the Governor's Island Bridge heading towards Glendale. As we approached the end of GI, my father turned to me and said, "you wanna drive the new boat?" Like any 12 year old boy would be, I excitedly said, "YES, CAN I?" As I took the wheel and pressed the throttle forward, I asked my father where we should go. In great detail, he said, "Let's go that way", pointing to the right of Timber Island and toward The Broads.

Being complete Newbies, we didn't have a map, didn't know anything about the buoys, and certainly had no clue what lied directly ahead of us. As we were skimming across the lake at about 20+ mph, I vividly remember my mother suddenly screaming, "ROCKS...ROCKS...!!!" Out of nowhere, my father's hand slammed the throttle into neutral and there were huge rocks all around us just under the surface. My parents and I were scared beyond belief. Once we calmed down, we broke out the paddles and paddled our way out of The Witches. Miraculously, the outdrive and hull never made contact with a single rock.

To this day, I believe that the only thing that saved us was the fact that it was early Spring and the lake level was high!
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Old 04-05-2016, 01:02 PM   #8
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Youthful indiscretion is one thing but failure to realize that when you get older, you tend to have put on a few pounds and your balance aint what it used to be.

About 15 years ago I had some work mates up to the lake and they wanted to go on a boat ride. Well we hauled the 14 horse Scott motor out of the garage and slipped my 14' Sears aluminum from it's shore berth into the water. One of my mates paddled the boat from the beach over to the dock where I figured would be a good place to get the engine started. Well, I stepped with one foot onto the stern bench and lost my balance as I planted my second foot. A few rock and rolls port to starboard and I swamped the boat and my mate into about 5 feet of water.

My skippermanship was forever lost in front them and hence it prompted me to offer them a ride on an unswampable boat. I paid for 3 round trip tickets on the Mount.
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:07 PM   #9
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You can travel between different lakes from squam?
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:26 PM   #10
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You can travel between different lakes from squam?
You can travel from Little Squam Lake (Ashland) to Big Squam Lake (Holderness/Center Harbor). The channel between the two is near Walter's Basin Restaurant/Post Office in Holderness. You can not get to any other lakes.

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Old 04-05-2016, 04:32 PM   #11
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There is Big Squam and Little Squam connected by a 1/4 mile channel. This is where the state boat launch is (off of Rt. 113). You pass over over it on Rt. 3 in Holderness.
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:01 PM   #12
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It was a bright sunny but chilly late October morning back in 1988 and we wanted to get one more ride on the boat we had just bought. This was my first boat that I owned but my experience goes back to 1958 with my dads boat. Things were closing up around here since it was late October so we drive 30 miles to a good ramp and get out of the car, put the ropes on the cleats and fenders on the sides. I hop back in my Blazer and start to back down the ramp and hear a strange noise that sounded like the rumble strips you hear on the highway, but keep in mind I am on a ramp in reverse creeping back no on the highway. I check my outside mirrors and no problem then I look at the inside mirror just in time to see the bow of the bow going up in the air . Long story, short, my son who was 10 at the time, being anxious to get going and more than willing to help reversed the ratchet on the winch. Now to make matters worse I HIT THE BRAKES! There goes the boat on to the ramp .
I hop out of my Blazer and first thing I do is look around to see if anybody's looking. Thank heavens there were very few people there like there would have been in July or August. So I get my wife to slowly back up while I crank the winch and get the boat back on the trailer. Luckily no serious damage and we managed to enjoy our last outing of the year.
2008 I found that same boat acrossed town from where live. My son saw it for sale on Craigslist so I had to go check it out and sure enough it was my old one
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Old 04-06-2016, 03:27 PM   #13
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First to all previous contributors.. Thanks reading these posts brought a chuckle to my day.....

Second,

Well it is 1986 we had just moved from Washington, and where at Winnipesaukee staying at my Aunts camp, with the boat for the first time.
We had a map, and where learning our way around... Then we got over confident.

We had gone by pistol and where headed up between the neck and Spectacle Island when all of a sudden we noticed some big rocks... Luckily we where going slowly. But we put the engine up and paddle our way out of the mess we found ourselves in.... (but that isn't the best part) Then we argued about what went wrong.... Dad had one version, I had another, brother had a 3rd and Uncle was just confused (note that while they had a place on the lake, they had never ventured out of the are between Long Island and the neck, as they only had a small sail boat).... Then we finally decided we better look at the map... if you know the area you know there are 6 Spars, 3 Red and 3 Black... They are SPARs not channel markers.... very important to remember... because all of a sudden the Reds and blacks switch sides... because going up the side of the hazard you need to first be to the south west of it... Then you need to be to the North of it..... and oh wait there is a hazard on the other side that you need to be to the east of and then to the south of the next hazard.....

We never have gotten cocky and over confident again.... better to look at the map every once in a while..... The lake humbled all of us that day

Third,

Didn't directly effect me other then I had to tow the guy, but years later we bought the camp next to my Aunts.... She had here place rented with a very nice renter..... over beers one night he told us that he was going out past pistol , and cutting across the nice wide open bay towards Chase Island and Nineteen mile bay....We asked if he had seen the markers, he mentioned he had but didn't understand what the concern was all about.... We showed him on the map but some how he didn't heed the warning.. On the last day of his vacation we towed him to his trailer, after he had limped home... It turns out there are big rocks in the middle of that wide open bay.... I have never seen a grown man hang his head so low... he couldn't look us in the eye, as he asked if we could tow him to him to the ramp.... The lesson he learned.... Locals do know a thing or two..... And when they call an area the Graveyard there usually is a good reason....
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Old 04-07-2016, 05:59 AM   #14
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I don't boat much anymore myself but have put one in the lake without the plug before. Oh they work just find as long as you keep moving forward and never stop. Still remember yelling to my B.I.L. on shore to go to the house and get the plug out of the garage well I kept the boat moving forward. Do something like that once and you typically never do it again.
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Old 04-07-2016, 08:25 AM   #15
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Smile First trip --on THE Big Lake !

I put my Penn Yan Swift in at Glendale -Goodhue & Hawkins -before State Marine Patrol- Decided to go for a quick Water Ski around Locke Is and back to dock. Well my first lesson was I did survive Skiing through the Witches but lost a fin on one of my ski's and by some miracle did not hit with my outboard motor. Went to the Marina and was introduced to the Lake Chart. ""DO not go without it!"" Lesson learned. We then went up to Paugus Bay to use the SKI Jump with permission. I am an Island person for 35+ years and has been GREAT ! kerk
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Old 04-07-2016, 10:14 AM   #16
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I’ve got one, back in the late 70s early 80s my buddy just bought a new canoe with a little 3 horse outboard, it was early spring and the ice was not completely out. As we all know the ice melts around the shore first and makes a “little river” around the shoreline, so we plopped the canoe in and headed for Ames farm where we were told that there was grate salmon fishing, (and open water) if I remember correctly we caught a couple of little guys and headed back to the camp, but in the time we were at Ames farm the ice shifted and blocked our passage back! Thank god we had paddles in the boat as we had to chip a new path home. It probably took us 10 minims to trolling to Ames and about 2 hours to get back. Lesson learned.
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Old 04-07-2016, 11:09 AM   #17
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Second,

Well it is 1986 we had just moved from Washington, and where at Winnipesaukee staying at my Aunts camp, with the boat for the first time.
We had a map, and where learning our way around... Then we got over confident.

We had gone by pistol and where headed up between the neck and Spectacle Island when all of a sudden we noticed some big rocks... Luckily we where going slowly. But we put the engine up and paddle our way out of the mess we found ourselves in.... (but that isn't the best part) Then we argued about what went wrong.... Dad had one version, I had another, brother had a 3rd and Uncle was just confused (note that while they had a place on the lake, they had never ventured out of the are between Long Island and the neck, as they only had a small sail boat).... Then we finally decided we better look at the map... if you know the area you know there are 6 Spars, 3 Red and 3 Black... They are SPARs not channel markers.... very important to remember... because all of a sudden the Reds and blacks switch sides... because going up the side of the hazard you need to first be to the south west of it... Then you need to be to the North of it..... and oh wait there is a hazard on the other side that you need to be to the east of and then to the south of the next hazard.....

We never have gotten cocky and over confident again.... better to look at the map every once in a while..... The lake humbled all of us that day


Add me to this list. Gone through this area dozens of times but about 10 years ago treated them as a channel markers and kissed one of the boulders. Since its a no wake zone I was not going fast enough to do any damage to the aluminum boat.

Another One

Back in the 80s and right around the corner in front of the boys camp my uncle had 5 people in is 18 foot bow rider. The red spar that sits out on a rock now in the middle of the "bay" was not there. During this trip he started to accelerate well before the rock, but do to the extra weight in the boat and his crappy Force engine it did not get on plane quick enough. He ripped 2 of the 3 blades off his prop. Luckily he was only several hundred yards from our dock.

Growing up navigating Winni makes navigation on every other lake I now go to a snap.
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Old 04-07-2016, 12:24 PM   #18
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Default Boat Fail

Having spent the past 14 years at the ramp at Sheps let me share this story for whatever it is worth A number of years ago, at the close of the season, a boater presented on the ramp to launch. He got the boat and trailer into the water as if he was a real pro then things went very badly! The driver exited the car at which time he quickly realized that the car was still in reverse with no parking brake engaged!! The boat floated nicely off the trailer as the car became submerged!! All we could do at the time was to secure the boat and get this guy inside and warmed up.
A diver was called to get a chain around the front axel.
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Old 04-07-2016, 02:38 PM   #19
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Default Some one else's fail

In front the of family cottage is a shallow rocky area with some exposed rocks on the far end. Though properly marked, over the years we have watched a multitude of boats come over the shoals (on the wrong side of the spar buoy), then correct course when they see the exposed rocks. Most don't hit bottom, but we have witnessed a few notable strikes.
The most memorable strike was after dark. Two boats came through on the wrong side, the lead we later learned was a Coronado, I think; the second was larger. We saw them safely clear the shallows, and thought they were safe. Then we saw the lead boat bounce ominously by the far end, and slow to a stop. When the trailing boat caught up, we heard the clear exchange "we hit something" (but no other signs of panic or injury). The larger boat towed the smaller away before MP arrived.
With the light of day, I found, sitting atop an exposed rock ledge, the rudder AND the driveshaft with propeller still attached.
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Old 04-07-2016, 06:57 PM   #20
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Here are 2 of my boat fails!

Last year I launched the 18' Stingray at Swains Lake in Barrington. I am very familiar with the launch ramp and knew it is shallow and there are lots of rocks around it. My wife was in the aft area of the boat as I started the motor but I neglected to ask her to move forward so the prop/outdrive could be higher and away the rocks/lake bottom. Yup, no sooner than I put it in drive I bent the prop blades and the skeg broke off on a rock. Luckily the boat ran OK for a short trip to my friends cottage with no vibrations or other issues. I was able to fix it with a new prop and SS Skeggard and I was a few $$ lighter.

In the late 70's while staying at the Bay Side Inn in Alton Bay I was starting my 15' White wood lapstrake (40hp Evenrude) with the pull start and it started OK except the motor was in forward even though the shifter looked to be in neutral. We were at the single dock in front of the office and the boat slammed into the rocks at the dock chewing a nice dent in the bow. I made a quick trip to the town ramp (wife met me with the trailer) and put the boat on the trailer see if the damage was any worse but luckily it wasn't.
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Old 04-07-2016, 08:15 PM   #21
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Having spent the past 14 years at the ramp at Sheps let me share this story for whatever it is worth A number of years ago, at the close of the season, a boater presented on the ramp to launch. He got the boat and trailer into the water as if he was a real pro then things went very badly! The driver exited the car at which time he quickly realized that the car was still in reverse with no parking brake engaged!! The boat floated nicely off the trailer as the car became submerged!! All we could do at the time was to secure the boat and get this guy inside and warmed up.
A diver was called to get a chain around the front axel.
My next door neighbor used to say that if you watch long enough someone will make it all worthwhile. He spent a lot of time at Sheps and was not disappointed.
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Old 04-08-2016, 08:48 AM   #22
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Well unfortunately I have several, but this the most memorable.
It was a beautiful day for a ride on the big lake and so we(four adults) headed out of Wolfeboro back bay in my 18' Rinkerbilt with an evinrude 70hp. We decided to head towards 19 mile bay, the lake was calm and all was going well. We fueled up at 19 mile bay and headed back and got out to the broads and made the turn towards Wolfeboro and the engine quit, after several attempts of starting with no luck, not even a sputter, I pulled the cover. It was 92 degrees and calm, with no breeze and no shade. I pulled the plugs and so on and determined it was getting fuel but just not firing.
After an hour or so of trying everything I could, I gave up. And every time we tried to wave someone down for help, they would wave back and keep on going.
But this was also my fishing boat and I had a trolling motor on the bow and used it to get back to Wolfeboro which had to be atleast 10 miles away.
Hours later, four extremely sunburned people loaded the boat and left. Next day I tried for hours to troublshoot the problem only to find that the rubber cover that kept the emergency stop button in the "in" position had dry rotted and the button had pushed through the rubber, killing the engine.
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Old 04-08-2016, 08:58 AM   #23
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I tried for hours to troublshoot the problem only to find that the rubber cover that kept the emergency stop button in the "in" position had dry rotted and the button had pushed through the rubber, killing the engine.
At least it was rotted .... better than being at the Town Docks (on completely the other side of the Lake), making a spectacle of yourself by running your battery down to where you get that dreadful sluggish cranking sound and you just know you have only one or two more attempts left .....when your teenage son pipes in and says "Dad, did you flip the Emergency Switch on the throttle back to "on" .... I turned it off when we left the boat to go shopping" ............ GGGRRRrrrrrr !!

That was the day I put my son up for adoption ........ he should be 33 by now, hope he is enjoying his new family !


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Old 04-08-2016, 10:34 AM   #24
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OK, I'll join in. My first (attempted) trip in my first boat did not go well.

When I was in my twenties I got a nice bonus at work and decided to buy a used boat. I had always wanted one but didn't know much about them. This was before the Internet so the wealth of information that we now take for granted was not so easily available. I bought a 1979 Marquis (IO, no manual), trailered it home, cleaned it up and equipped it with a VHF radio and all the recommended safety gear. I also started it for a few minutes and shifted it to make sure everything was working properly. Ear muffs? No one told me about that.

On a quiet weekday I trailered it down to the ramp on the Charles River for my first ride. I was so excited as I dropped it in the water for the first time. Since I was alone I pulled it to the side and tied it to a tree while I parked the SUV and trailer. I walked back, untied it, and hopped in. To my surprise it was quickly filling with water since in my excitement I forgot the plug. I tried the bilge pump but it didn't work. I dove in to the filthy water, inserted the plug and, with some help, managed to get it started onto the trailer. As I slowly cranked it up the water slowly drained out and I took a deep breath and got ready for another try.

I again launched the boat (this time with the plug in) pushed off, started it up, put it in gear and headed up the river. About 100 yards up I started to smell something and looked back to see steam pouring out of the engine compartment. Another boat pulled up and offered to help. He told me to check the water pump impeller and towed me back to the ramp. This time I hauled it out and headed back home a very discouraged boat owner.

The next day I bought a manual and ear muffs and took apart the outdrive. The fuel pump was a melted hunk of plastic. The U-joints were sloppy so I replaced those too as well as the gaskets. When I was done I understood the engine and IO much better. I ran the boat for another 15 years and never forgot the plug or to use the ear muffs. Hard earned lessons.

Anyone else?
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Old 04-08-2016, 11:38 AM   #25
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My next door neighbor used to say that if you watch long enough someone will make it all worthwhile. He spent a lot of time at Sheps and was not disappointed.
That's just cruel!
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Old 04-08-2016, 12:41 PM   #26
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Default Wow does THIS sound familiar....

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It was early Spring, 1974. My father had just taken delivery of his first-ever new boat...a 1974 Wellcraft 18' bowrider. It was literally our first time ever on the lake in a boat. We had passed through the Governor's Island Bridge heading towards Glendale. As we approached the end of GI, my father turned to me and said, "you wanna drive the new boat?" Like any 12 year old boy would be, I excitedly said, "YES, CAN I?" As I took the wheel and pressed the throttle forward, I asked my father where we should go. In great detail, he said, "Let's go that way", pointing to the right of Timber Island and toward The Broads.

Being complete Newbies, we didn't have a map, didn't know anything about the buoys, and certainly had no clue what lied directly ahead of us. As we were skimming across the lake at about 20+ mph, I vividly remember my mother suddenly screaming, "ROCKS...ROCKS...!!!" Out of nowhere, my father's hand slammed the throttle into neutral and there were huge rocks all around us just under the surface. My parents and I were scared beyond belief. Once we calmed down, we broke out the paddles and paddled our way out of The Witches. Miraculously, the outdrive and hull never made contact with a single rock.

To this day, I believe that the only thing that saved us was the fact that it was early Spring and the lake level was high!
First boat was a 1989 Wellcraft 192 classic and I thought I knew it all. We were out on the lake with another couple (no map no brains) and cruising along the north side of Governors Island heading towards Welch. I look over at my buddy sitting in the port side seat and say to him "The thing I like about this lake is if you stay away from the shoreline you're pretty safe out here" Just as I finished saying that....I spot a seagull ..... perched atop a boulder....just off my bow. Hellooo Witches!! Again NO MAP NO BRAINS!! Shut it all down and paddled my way out to deeper water. They still ride me about it regularly. I didn't hit anything but was extremely lucky.... that day I got a map.

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Old 04-08-2016, 12:56 PM   #27
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That's just cruel!
Spring is the best time to Ramp Watch. Lots of newly "Certificated" mariners with their new boats and no hands on experience. Typically they are older boats that haven't been started and or run since last season....or even longer. The most common situation is the engine won't start, and the line waiting to launch is getting longer.

I have a favorite spot to watch the proceedings from the top of the ramp where I can see the starboard side of the boat (aft) where the bilge pump discharge is usually located. If they actually get the boat in the water..and maybe even the engine started, I watch for the bilge pump to come on and start pumping water. If I see this, I make a quick sprint down to the boat and ask the owner if he put the Plug In. Sometimes just a blank stare. What plug? Most of them are appreciative of the reminder.

BTW: Don't even bother to try to put the plug in, from the boat, after the boat is in the water. It's impossible to do....especially if you have an out drive. Your arms are not long enough. Just smile at the people waiting, ...haul the boat back out...put the plug in and relaunch

My very First Launch of my last powerboat over 20 years ago is when I learned this lesson. NB
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Old 04-08-2016, 01:25 PM   #28
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Smile Boat Fail Confessions

Actually forgot about the first incidence. As the kids were all getting a little older I wanted them to enjoy water skiing on the lake, so I purchased a used 1985 Mastercraft Ski Boat. The original owner had cautioned me that the water pump leaked a little and that I should keep my eye on it. Obsessive compulsive that I am, that was not good enough so I replaced the whole pump. This is an externally driven bronze pump off the 351 Ford. Hooked my garden hose to one side of the pump and ran it in the driveway, all seemed tight and the engine ran cool. Before heading to the "cottage" in West Alton for a two week vacation I thought I would maiden voyage the ski boat in a small lake in Hamilton Mass, Chebacco Lake, just to be sure all was well. It all seemed OK until the engine temp pinned the gauge and smoke began to billow from the engine cover. Mobil 1 was the only thing that saved that 351 Windsor. The engine got so hot it melted the cam follower on the points. One of my first experiences with Dave Ewing, the seasoned professional reputation that he has well earned and deserves, glib, but helpful, he explained over the phone that I was trying to blow water through the hull, rather than appropriately sucking it in through the pump to cool the engine. One impeller later and a swap of the hoses made things right. Again total buffoonery thinking I knew anything about boats!
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Old 04-08-2016, 01:58 PM   #29
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Spring is the best time to Ramp Watch. Lots of newly "Certificated" mariners with their new boats and no hands on experience. Typically they are older boats that haven't been started and or run since last season....or even longer. The most common situation is the engine won't start, and the line waiting to launch is getting longer.

I have a favorite spot to watch the proceedings from the top of the ramp where I can see the starboard side of the boat (aft) where the bilge pump discharge is usually located. If they actually get the boat in the water..and maybe even the engine started, I watch for the bilge pump to come on and start pumping water. If I see this, I make a quick sprint down to the boat and ask the owner if he put the Plug In. Sometimes just a blank stare. What plug? Most of them are appreciative of the reminder.

BTW: Don't even bother to try to put the plug in, from the boat, after the boat is in the water. It's impossible to do....especially if you have an out drive. Your arms are not long enough. Just smile at the people waiting, ...haul the boat back out...put the plug in and relaunch

My very First Launch of my last powerboat over 20 years ago is when I learned this lesson. NB
Hey now!! I will be "that guy" this spring as I am picking up my 07 H190 next Thursday from the marina. I will be taking a shakedown cruise with the salesman so I will get a "hands on" for my first launch and haul-out.
After that, I'll be on my own so I may have a story to tell with the coming season...Hopefully, they'll just be "oh shoot!" moments that I can remedy and recover from quickly.
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Old 04-08-2016, 02:22 PM   #30
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Default Drain Plug Reminder (TIP)

I had a eight inch long (1/8" diameter) Dacron, (Nylon will also work) Cord permanently attached to the tail end of the drain plug. When the plug is installed in the transom drain hole, the cord will "stream" harmlessly behind the transom while underway. Make sure to "touch" the tail end of the cord with a lighted match to "seal" the end so it won't fray and come unraveled.

When the boat is hauled out onto the trailer at the ramp after a day on the water, I remove the plug and take it up to the trailer winch and tie it to the winch handle where it will stay until the next launch.....where I will SEE the Plug and remind me to install it in the transom drain immediately. NB
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Old 04-08-2016, 02:26 PM   #31
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Hey now!! I will be "that guy" this spring as I am picking up my 07 H190 next Thursday from the marina. I will be taking a shakedown cruise with the salesman so I will get a "hands on" for my first launch and haul-out.
Best of luck with your new boat! Don't worry about the ramp launch peeps.....most of them are landlubbers!
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Old 04-08-2016, 02:41 PM   #32
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Default Boat fail

Ok, I have another one for you: During the summer of 2003, Shep Browns sold a new 28 ft cruiser to a wonderful couple from a town south west of the lake. On the day that they arrived to pick-up the boat and get the shake
down cruise they announced that they were going to Meredith for lunch. Now this boat had a gps, vhf, a new Bizer Chart Etc.. At 3m we get a call from our new customer who says " I am very lost" Since I took the call, my first question was " What does your gps say?? Well he admitted that that he had not thought to turn the unit on!! When I informed him that he was not lost I think he felt better and I asked him for the coordinates and told him to get out the Bizer. People need to realize that Winni is a big lake but if you think that you are lost. find a Lighted Buoy and write down the number. The location of each are found on the back section of the chart.
He was one very embarrassed dude upon his return!!
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Old 04-08-2016, 05:25 PM   #33
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Near the end of the '14 boating season I hit something at the ramp while loading the boat. Put a small ding in the prop, nothing major but it needed to be repaired. Over the winter I sent both props to New England Propeller for repair and balancing.
First trip out in '15 we cruise down to Alton Bay, boat is running smooth as silk. On the way back we stop at the West Alton sand bar. Drop the front anchor, drift back and drop the back anchor, and then I did something I never do, I put the boat in gear to help the Admiral get us back into position. The second I put it in gear I sucked 6' of chain into my props! Duhhh!
It is not easy getting chain out of props when it's wrapped in two different directions.
Surprisingly there was no damage to the props.
Took me about a month to get over such a dumb move.
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Old 04-08-2016, 06:05 PM   #34
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Newport, RI: Decades ago: I think it was my C&C 32.. Sail.

I anchored at a particular spot in the harbor..I have no clew why I anchored there. As soon as I got anchored..some guy on shore was yelling at me and pointing to a Large Billboard on shore nearby that said: SUBMERGED CABLE..Do Not Anchor.

SO: I immediately hauled up short to retrieve my anchor (A CQR Plow). NO GO. I was hooked up on the cable.

ON DECK: ....I remembered a passage in a book I had read by a guy named Eric Hiscock. He and his wife had spent their lives sailing around the world.

HE SAID: When you get in a situation.... In which I was currently in, slack off to the full length of your anchor rode...and then carefully drive off to one side or the other.. under power (maintaining some tension) until you are about 90 degrees to where your anchor is...then slowly haul in your anchor. You will be hauling your anchor..Sliding Along the cable..as opposed to "hooking" the cable at some angle.

IT WORKED. NB

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Old 04-08-2016, 07:22 PM   #35
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.Here's another story that will make you laugh. We were on the Chesapeake Bay and stopped at Jelly Fish Joels for dinner. My wife and I were down there for the weekend and staying with some friends who have a summer place there. It was about 730pm when we left and since it was September it was getting dark earlier as we idled out of the lagoon where it's located I snapped a beautiful picture of the sunset as it was nearing the horizon a crossed the bay, We were on the eastern shore. I figured I had about 15 minutes of good daylight and if I laid into the throttles we should be nearly back to our friends house by the time we had to slow down. It was about a 10 mile ride north up the channel. I put the camera on a small ledge next to the bolster and as I did the starboard engine died. Oh well no biggie, put it in neutral and turn the key. Crank, no start. Hit the throttle once crank again and no start. Hit the throttle again only twice this time, and again crank NO START. SOOOOOO we had a 10 mile ride home on one engine at 3000 rpm and 10 mph, bow in the air pushing water. Needless to say it was dark well before we returned home but on a brighter note I learned how to navigate the shipping channel in pretty much total darkness. It was well marked with range marks and red and green channel markers. Sunday morning I replace the ignition module, no help. Then run to the nearest open marine supply and get a new pickup for the distributor and replace that. No help! Now I'm stuck. Got 12 volts to the coil but no spark!! Sat there on the back seat for about 10 minutes pondering the problem , then just for laughs try starting it one more time. I stood up leaned over the bolster and reached down to the ignition switch which now had me looking down at the floor and the lanyard safety switch clip laying there . Well, I Put it back in place where it belongs before I knocked it off with the camera the night before and the starter no sooner engaged and it fired right up. Oh well, it was a beautiful night on the bay. Also known as the advantages of twins
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Old 04-09-2016, 06:23 AM   #36
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It was the first time using my new-to-me second boat on Winnipesaukee. I was rounding FL1 (did not know at the time that you can safely go on either side) headed toward the Governor's Island bridge from the Weirs channel on a busy Summer Saturday and the engine died. I began troubleshooting and knew it was an electrical issue rather quickly. I was busy rigging up a temporary power wire to hot wire the engine (which was proving a challenge since the wake action in that area made it like trying to work inside a washing machine) when a kind soul offered a tow to the nearest Marina. <5 minutes into the tow I spotted the kill switch lanyard and clip sitting on the cockpit sole; I had knocked it out with my knee. This was the first boat I ever owned that had one. Doh.

Later that same season was the one and only time I hit rocks with the prop on Winnipesaukee. It was right where the markers swap sides by Pistol Island and I took the "obvious" route. Forunately it was at idle speed and I had a spare prop.
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Old 04-09-2016, 09:33 AM   #37
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First weekend with a new-to-me boat. Pulled up to Meredith Marine to put gas in for the first time. Removed the cap and let the nice young lady fill it up. It took very little gas. I was pulling away from the pumps wondering if the gas gauge worked and a horrifying thought occurred to me… Did I just fill the fresh water supply with gasoline? Sure enough… I had never had a fresh water tank on a boat and had just opened the cap I saw on the gunnel. Thought I’d take that one to my grave, but there it is!

Like some others we found ourselves in the Witches once about 30 years ago, but I wasn’t driving, and the boat was fine.

-don
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Old 04-09-2016, 10:59 AM   #38
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First weekend with a new-to-me boat. Pulled up to Meredith Marine to put gas in for the first time. Removed the cap and let the nice young lady fill it up. It took very little gas. I was pulling away from the pumps wondering if the gas gauge worked and a horrifying thought occurred to me… Did I just fill the fresh water supply with gasoline? Sure enough… I had never had a fresh water tank on a boat and had just opened the cap I saw on the gunnel. Thought I’d take that one to my grave, but there it is!

Like some others we found ourselves in the Witches once about 30 years ago, but I wasn’t driving, and the boat was fine.

-don
Yikes...how did you purge the fresh water system of gas?
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:09 AM   #39
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Yikes...how did you purge the fresh water system of gas?
It actually wasn't too bad, if memory serves, the holding tank was actually a small red plastic gas tank that was easily accessed and removed. More embarrassing than damaging...
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:20 AM   #40
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It actually wasn't too bad, if memory serves, the holding tank was actually a small red plastic gas tank that was easily accessed and removed. More embarrassing than damaging...
Glad to hear it wasn't too bad. Fortunately the gas and potable water fills are on opposite sides of my boat. The waste pump-out however is next to the gas fill. Getting those two mixed-up would be a disaster....
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Old 04-09-2016, 08:56 PM   #41
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My 1st trip to winni with my own boat My wife is wanted to rent instead of hauling our 20' center console from Boothbay area I won and hauled up the boat w/o any mishaps yet it felt heavier than normal. I nervously launched at merideth just after passing the temporary license test at merideth marine by the skin of my teeth. Hooked up the boat to the dock and someone pointed out there was water on my floor. I thanked him and explained it's just water coming in through the scuppers. I thanked him and when he walked away I got concerned opened a floor cover and realized my billge pump was not working and I had about 14" of water from two days of heavy rain. At this point impressing my wife wasn't working out. I drove it to merideth marine where they probably regretted giving me my license. They immediately lifted it out of the water and let it pour for 30 minutes Finally we're ready. Drove to Shipley and had a great meal. Upon leaving my wife asked if I've checked the weather. I said looks great. She said there's a dark cloud, I said its nothing By the time we got to rattlesnake isl
The sky was black, lightning bolts chased us to ames farm where we anchored up, ran for shelter in there office and waited it out with or golden retriever at a non pet friendly resort. They were very nice. Not my most impressive day.
I still loved being on the lake. Now it's our favorite place to be
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Old 04-10-2016, 11:17 AM   #42
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Did I just fill the fresh water supply with gasoline?
Not as bad as those who mistook a rod holder for the gas fill and ended up with 20 gallons of fuel in the bilge.
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Old 04-11-2016, 05:09 PM   #43
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I have been lucky prior to this season. Last season I had 2 incidents where I was "that" guy both in the same day. Memorial day weekend trying to fuel up with 100 other people waiting, we put in about 140$ worth of gas and then the boat wouldn't start. Dead in the water, starter was shot with everyone waiting.

Then after getting a ride to my house luckily just around the corner to get the truck and trailer, I tried to tow it out with my Wrangler which cant tow worth a damn and couldn't even make it up the ramp where more people were clearly waiting.

Learned two things that day, although I know the Wrangler is a useless tow vehicle, I thought towing it 1,000 feet for service would be fine and that diagnosing electrical problems on the fly is not my strong suit.
This ever happens again take a tool on board (hammer, screwdriver, something hard enough and able to reach the started and try tapping it with some force. Should free up the gears a bit and enable it to spin. It's a temp fix in a bind like that to get it spinning but still will likely need replacing.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:24 AM   #44
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Default yup....

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This ever happens again take a tool on board (hammer, screwdriver, something hard enough and able to reach the started and try tapping it with some force. Should free up the gears a bit and enable it to spin. It's a temp fix in a bind like that to get it spinning but still will likely need replacing.
Yup, reminds me of my military time when I used to hear "When all else fails, get a bigger hammer!!!".
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:35 AM   #45
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Default We goin' down!

Several years ago, we had our ski boat on the Chesapeake bay for a few seasons at my parents house on the Eastern Shore. We did not have a boat lift yet and needed to trailer the boat every time we used it. My parents and I decided to take the boat out. After completing all of the standard checks (including the drain plug) we dropped it in the water at the marina. We idled out of the marina, and once past the channel markers began to plane off. All of a sudden the temp gauge shot up and water began pouring out of the engine compartment. Admittedly a bit panicked, I threw the bilge on and quickly headed back to the ramp to pull the boat out. Turns out I forgot to check that the water intake hose was connected. Not something I normally check when boating on the lake. After using the boat in brackish water, we flushed the engine each time by disconnecting the hose right after the water filter and shoving a garden hose down the tube with the engine running for a couple minutes. Similar to the concept of muffs for an I/O. I was not the last person to use the boat and apparently the standard operating procedure after flushing the engine did not include connecting the intake hose again. Lesson learned.
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Old 04-14-2016, 03:14 PM   #46
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Default Yup!

Similar event some years ago. Cruising along at 3000 rpm and two bilge pump "on" lights appeared, along with a buzzer. All else looked OK. So, I slowed down and raised the hatch, and water was pouring out of a hose just before it entered the muffler. This was first run of the season. Whoever de-winterized the engines missed a hose re-connect. A brief engine start at the docks would not pump enough water to force the bilge pumps on, so it went undetected.

Different boat, around 1984. 1971 Chris Craft with closed cooling system. Again, early season run. Corrosion in the heat exchangers and they both blew at nearly the same time. So much for twins giving you the benefit of a get home ability. We weren't far off shore and the wind blew us gently into a nearby dock. We got a ride home and a little later came back and towed the boat home, then towed it to the marina the next day.

J'ever notice? These things seem to happen at 4:31, just after the marina put the phone on the answer machine. Nice to know that SeaTow and TowBOAT/US are available now. An oddity to me: these plans will pay if I break down almost anyplace but my homeport. So, if it won't start at camp, I have to be sure to note that the marina is my homeport, not the camp. Then they will pay the tow bill to get me to the marina or to do service on site. Of course, service done at the marina is maintenance. They don't pay for that. Same job at camp is "emergency start". Paid for.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:35 PM   #47
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Des, whoever winterized your boat quite simply forgot to give it a trial prior to delivery. Just no excuse for such an oversight.
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Old 04-19-2016, 09:35 AM   #48
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This sort of fits in here. Made me laugh anyway.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qHdPhkSSNQ
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Old 04-19-2016, 09:51 AM   #49
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I was about...hmmm...17 maybe? We were on the way back from a day of boating. We arrived at our dock on the Weirs Channel. Everything was going fine. I slowly pulled forward into the dock, and as the boat slipped ever so gently past the posts, I, in my 17 year old block of a brain decided "Hmm, this would be a good time to shut the engine off".

Now, I had been driving boats for 5 years that day. But for some reason, decided to see what would happen when you kill the engine to a moving boat, that weighs about 5000 pounds...well, guess what happened to our dock that day ...yeah.. You can't put into reverse a boat that isn't running! DUMAS!
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Old 04-22-2016, 06:31 AM   #50
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J'ever notice? These things seem to happen at 4:31, just after the marina put the phone on the answer machine. Nice to know that SeaTow and TowBOAT/US are available now. An oddity to me: these plans will pay if I break down almost anyplace but my homeport. So, if it won't start at camp, I have to be sure to note that the marina is my homeport, not the camp. Then they will pay the tow bill to get me to the marina or to do service on site. Of course, service done at the marina is maintenance. They don't pay for that. Same job at camp is "emergency start". Paid for.
TowBOATUS offers an "Unlimited Gold" plan that includes 100% payment for towing from your home port. See the details at http://www.boatus.com/towing/services.asp
The regular membership includes 50% payment for towing from your home port.

Seatow offers similar dock-to-dock towing from your home port.
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Old 04-22-2016, 08:45 AM   #51
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Checked out for a minute when putting on my registration stickers this season. Totally forgot they were supposed to read right to left and instead put them both up front of the registration numbers! DOH brain cramp
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Old 04-22-2016, 09:21 AM   #52
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Checked out for a minute when putting on my registration stickers this season. Totally forgot they were supposed to read right to left and instead put them both up front of the registration numbers! DOH brain cramp
There goes "your magic decoder ring" !!!!! :O

I live here... I am always Upthesaukee.
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Old 04-22-2016, 05:25 PM   #53
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Default I know a guy..........

who forgot to lock his trailer hitch lever and on the highway it got loose and the boat went off into the woods.Another time he ran the boat in the driveway without muffs and cooked the water impeller then cooked the 85 Johnson at the lake.Another time he was backing it down the ramp with the boat unhooked from the winch and the boat slid off the trailer onto the pavement during a heatwave.The worst thing I did was forget to haul up the anchor at Lake Nubanusit,was scratching my head for why the Baja 220 Sport lacked power.I had it out to the Isles of Shoals scuba diving and was nearly hit by lightning watching a storm to the south.Then we surfaced from the 2nd dive and almost couldn't see the boat through the fog.Found the harbor by listening to the fog horns but couldn't make it to the trailer in Dover too foggy,left it at Kittery Point Yacht Club.I went to Beverly Harbor with a friend and his gf's dad said no,I didn't use the boat,it's got plenty of gas in it.So after diving we ran out of gas east of Misery Island and two drunks towed us and they ran out of gas then spilled beer in the tank while refilling it.Then they towed us onto a beach not looking where they were going.Be careful out there!!
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Old 04-22-2016, 08:18 PM   #54
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Donzi18, please warn me when you are out on the lake! LOL!!!
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Old 06-23-2016, 01:54 PM   #55
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Default I've been lucky...

but I suppose it can happen to anyone if you boat long enough and have a momentary lapse of attention!

Last weekend I pulled a "rookie mistake" leaving my dock...I untied the lines and started to back out when I realized I missed a line at the bow.

And a few years ago I bought a new trailer for my old 20ft bowrider. While the boat was off the trailer on stands I figured what better time to wax the bottom, so I did. When I was checking the fit of the boat on the trailer I pulled the trailer with the boat out of the barn and into the driveway which has a slight incline. "Hmmm what's that click, click, click noise?" I said to myself when I realized the winch was not locked and the boat was sliding backwards off the trailer! I jumped from the truck and grabbed the winch in time to prevent disaster! The boat had slid about 3 feet back! Moral of that story...a freshly waxed bottom makes for VERY easy unloading!
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Old 06-23-2016, 02:50 PM   #56
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I was gunkholing last Sunday around Ragged Island. I was planning to anchor on the east side in an area with so many rocks that I felt compelled to use two anchors. I got my stern anchor out of storage and ready to go, then placed it on my swim platform so it would be easy to deploy. We scouted the area and poked around a bit then gave up on anchoring there and dsecided to move to another part of the lake. Once clear of the rocky parts, I throttled up and heard a splash. Doh! Lost a 1 kilogram Lewmar claw with 5 feet of chain and 70 feet of 3/8" three strand in 45 feet of water. At least it was a cheap setup... I got another anchor and some line to replace it this week for 40 bucks. Already had some chain that was attached to a bent up fluke style anchor that I found while snorkeling last year.
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Old 06-24-2016, 11:54 AM   #57
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Default Entertainment at Shibleys

We enjoy sitting on the deck for dinner at Shibleys and have had some memorable entertainment.

The first time, my son and I arrived before the rest of the family; once we were seated, looked out and about 300 yards offshore is a MP boat with lights flashing next to a small boat which appeared down at the bow (a little unusual). On closer inspection, saw a wheel toward the stern on our side. Turns out the owner of the new boat, trailer AND pickup truck had his friend back the boat down the ramp while he was in it. They hadn't yet taken off the rear tiedowns. Instead of the friend stepping on the brake to stop, he stepped on the gas. The boat, attached to the trailer and the pickup floated out until the pickup sank, so we were looking at the boat still attached to the trailer with the trailer still attached to the pickup truck which was now at the bottom of the lake. Had to get a flatbed, a diver took the cable out, freed the boat from the trailer and took it to the dock, disconnected the trailer and dragged the pickup out on its side, then went back and hooked up the trailer and dragged it out as well. Boat and trailer (after some cleaning and repair survived but the pickup was toast.

Second time, family of four with what must have been a first-time with the brand new boat; wife backs the trailer down and husband starts the engine and moves the boat to pickup the wife and two younger children. All get in and they start off, apparently nobody had explained to him how to put the outdrive down. We are all yelling at him but he ignore us and proceeds across Alton Bay, very, very slowly. As we watch him cross the bay and head north along the opposite shore, every so often see him try to accellerate and all you see is a rooster tail as the outdrive was still not down. Several boats appeared to slow down and attempt to say something to him, but he kept going the same way until he was out of sight. Must have been upset that his boat wouldn't go fast.
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:11 PM   #58
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Default Last day of the 2016 season...

...Bringing the boat in for winter storage at Shep's with a strong East wind and my first mate on the starboard bow to tie up as I manuever to dock.

I approach a little too close to the valet area when a gust pushes me too close to the dock where I apply a little too much power and dump my mate head over heals into the center walkway. Stupid, stupid, stupid!

Good news, she's OK and she'll be at the helm to (hopefully not) pay me back next year!
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Old 11-06-2016, 09:43 PM   #59
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Default I rememeber that day....

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We enjoy sitting on the deck for dinner at Shibleys and have had some memorable entertainment.

The first time, my son and I arrived before the rest of the family; once we were seated, looked out and about 300 yards offshore is a MP boat with lights flashing next to a small boat which appeared down at the bow (a little unusual). On closer inspection, saw a wheel toward the stern on our side. Turns out the owner of the new boat, trailer AND pickup truck had his friend back the boat down the ramp while he was in it. They hadn't yet taken off the rear tiedowns. Instead of the friend stepping on the brake to stop, he stepped on the gas. The boat, attached to the trailer and the pickup floated out until the pickup sank, so we were looking at the boat still attached to the trailer with the trailer still attached to the pickup truck which was now at the bottom of the lake. Had to get a flatbed, a diver took the cable out, freed the boat from the trailer and took it to the dock, disconnected the trailer and dragged the pickup out on its side, then went back and hooked up the trailer and dragged it out as well. Boat and trailer (after some cleaning and repair survived but the pickup was toast.
I was coming in from a day on the lake and my dock was just past the public docks and saw that. Couldn't figure out what was up with his bow until I saw the trailer. YIKES.
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Old 01-10-2017, 06:28 AM   #60
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Lightbulb Sailing Home with an Omega Sail?

Especially on a busy weekend, when TowBoatUS is very busy—and not always finding their hookup—this lightweight and compact device could get you home:




.
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Old 01-10-2017, 09:04 AM   #61
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I don't know if anyone on here happened to be at the Meredith loading ramp this summer when the guy dropped his brand new boat on the ramp. I guess he took the safety chain off before he backed into the water and the winch must have been on release. The boat rolled right off the trailer as he was backing up. I wasn't there to see it but my best friend knows the guy and he said he called him up crying and asking him for advise on how to get it back on the trailer. I heard it tied up the loading ramp for 4 hours.
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Old 01-10-2017, 09:43 AM   #62
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Especially on a busy weekend, when TowBoatUS is very busy—and not always finding their hookup—this lightweight and compact device could get you home:




.
That looks like a recipe for disaster...looks like a lot of moving parts (lines).
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Old 01-11-2017, 11:13 AM   #63
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Also looks like it will get you home if home is down wind.
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Old 01-11-2017, 05:09 PM   #64
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Default boat fail confessions

Several years ago I worked at a salt water marina that handled some good size cruisers. We had a teenage "dock boy" to assist with landings and pump gas. He was helping one of our customers dock his 35 footer. The owner's two BIKINI clad daughters were handling lines. One of them LEANED over the railing to throw him a line and our boy walked right off the end of the pier!
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:31 PM   #65
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Last August I was in unfamiliar waters NE of Dow Island across from Long Island. Didn't check the chart carefully enough and a large solid structure jumped up off the bottom and struck the outdrive. Really, it wasn't MY fault!

Some on the boat claimed we were sinking just because the engine compartment and the cabin floor were quickly under several inches of water. Nonsense, I replied, we are simply taking on water. I'm not sure it made them feel any better, though.

We were very fortunate, however. A good Samaritan living in a nearby shore front home heard the impact and soon came out to rescue us from sinking. She towed us to Trexler's Marina, thus saving the boat from going to the bottom.

$18k and the boat is now fixed. I can't say enough good things about both our Good Samaritan and BoatUS insurance. She was an extremely competent captain.The insurance company covered almost everything and we are very grateful.

And, it makes for an interesting story!
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:39 PM   #66
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Last August I was in unfamiliar waters NE of Dow Island across from Long Island. Didn't check the chart carefully enough and a large solid structure jumped up off the bottom and struck the outdrive. Really, it wasn't MY fault!

Some on the boat claimed we were sinking just because the engine compartment and the cabin floor were quickly under several inches of water. Nonsense, I replied, we are simply taking on water. I'm not sure it made them feel any better, though.

We were very fortunate, however. A good Samaritan living in a nearby shore front home heard the impact and soon came out to rescue us from sinking. She towed us to Trexler's Marina, thus saving the boat from going to the bottom.

$18k and the boat is now fixed. I can't say enough good things about both our Good Samaritan and BoatUS insurance. She was an extremely competent captain.The insurance company covered almost everything and we are very grateful.

And, it makes for an interesting story!
Expensive lesson learned.
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Old 01-19-2017, 06:56 AM   #67
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Lightbulb Saving with Sails...

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Originally Posted by HellRaZoR004 View Post
That looks like a recipe for disaster...looks like a lot of moving parts (lines).
The kite can be raised by one person, with just two lines. The kite is extended high into the stronger winds found aloft: those winds being unavailable to all but the tallest sailcraft.

A few years ago, while fuel prices were increasing, kites were used on ocean-going ships to save about 20% in fuel costs. On some ships, the savings was passed to crew members.



• Anne Quéméré kited across the North Atlantic (and Pacific) in an 18-foot boat—solo. To use the weather to her best advantage, the usual kite was used with the occasional sea anchor.
Story and video at site: http://yachtpals.com/kite-sailing-boat-quemere-3095

• Ironically, it was a search for a missing US Navy "rescue ship" that resulted in a US Navy submarine becoming disabled itself, and being forced to sail into Hawaii:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_R-14_(SS-91)

This is Anne Quéméré adventuring the North Atlantic:
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Old 02-28-2017, 02:17 PM   #68
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A few years ago we were out on the lake after the end of the official season, the lake was low and there weren't many people around. I had rented a place on Patrician Shore Ct near Center Harbor and we had had to survey the lake by canoe to find the safe way to the dock because of the lack of clarity of the paper chart my friend, the owner of the Donzi 21C Regazza, insisted on using. John is old school, he works in technology, we met when I was mid twenties and we were both doing guided missile work. John learned to navigate with the British Army, so he takes great pride in getting around without technology in his home life. I learned as a Scout (Britain dropped Boy from the name decades ago), so I take what help I can get, to be certain. At that time, about ten years ago, the Google satellite images for the lake weren't great, the reflections from the water and low resolution made them almost useless. These days you can clearly see the dock and the deep water exit straight along the shoreline to the north east, and then rounding the point to the south east and into deep water.

Towards the end of the week John suggested we head over to Moultonborough Bay. It was a great day for being on the lake, there was only a slight breeze, it was a little chilly at around 60F but the lake was almost flat calm. This was before speed limits, so we were able to charge along at around 40 knots in open water. At Chase Point we could see everyone was going to the east around Melvin Island, but John prides himself on his navigation and insisted we just continue through The Graveyard. So I told him to take over. He refused, said it would 'do me good'. So I picked my way through, with the lake low those submerged rocks looked very very hard and close and the water between looks very deep. But no problem, we got through and out into open water again.

Returning at moderate speed (25 knots?) I again suggested we take the deep water. "No, you've done it once, you can do it again." Hmm. That sounds like a recipe for disaster. On the way in I wasn't convinced that keeping to the marked channel had had us far enough from the rocks, but fair enough, it's his boat. So back down to a couple of knots, and I picked my way through the five(!!!) sets of buoys again. After clearing the last set the water looked deep and dark again. Escaped. After crawling along a little further the boss told me to go ahead. OK, great. Everyone sitting down? No traffic? Full power! The sudden intake roar, 275hp to the beautiful Duoprop. The stern dug in, we started to climb out onto the plane again... bump. Vibration. Nothing spectacular. Power off and engine off and tilt the drive up and it's a different story. The Volvo Duoprop was pretzeled. Fortunately it still provided some drive. So we crawled all the way back at low speed. Post mortem found that not only were the props bent but the inner shaft was also bent.

Suddenly it was all my fault, and I happily offered to pay to fix the thing, but John wouldn't hear of that. So I asked him the drive model, intending to just send him the parts. He knew he was in the wrong and wouldn't hear of that. After a few days his wife told him "you know it was your own fault, stop being a jerk about it" and that was the end of the matter.

Back home I checked the charts. That day on the lake there was only a straight shot through five sets of buoys, but where I went straight ahead there should have been a sixth set offset marking a slight dogleg to port. Well. There you go. We should have taken the safe route. That incident gave me an abiding love of jet drives.

Last edited by geordie; 02-28-2017 at 02:27 PM. Reason: Clarity and accuracy.
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Old 02-28-2017, 02:28 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by geordie View Post
A few years ago we were out on the lake after the end of the official season, the lake was low and there weren't many people around. I had rented a place on Patrician Shore Ct near Center Harbor and we had had to survey the lake by canoe to find the safe way to the dock because of the lack of clarity of the paper chart my friend, the owner of the Donzi 21C Regazza, insisted on using. John is old school, he works in technology, we met when I was mid twenties and we were both doing guided missile work. So John takes great pride in getting around without technology in his home life. At that time the google satellite images weren't great, the reflections from the water and low resolution made them almost useless. These days you can clearly see the dock and the deep water exit straight along the shoreline to the north east, and then rounding the point to the south east and into deep water.

Towards the end of the week John suggested we head over to Moultonborough Bay. At Chase Point we could see everyone was going to the east around Melvin Island, but John prides himself on his navigation and insisted we just continue through The Graveyard. So I told him to take over in that case. He refused, said it would 'do me good'. So I picked my way through, with the lake low those submerged rocks looked very very hard and close and the water between looks very deep. But no problem, we got through and out into open water again.

Returning at moderate speed (25 knots?) I again suggested we take the deep water. "No, you've done it once, you can do it again." Hmm. That sounds like a recipe for disaster. On the way in I wasn't convinced that keeping to the marked channel had had us far enough from the rocks, but fair enough, it's his boat. So back down to a couple of knots, and I picked my way through the five(!!!) sets of buoys again. After clearing the last set the water looked deep and dark again. Escaped. After crawling along a little further the boss told me to go ahead. OK, great. Everyone sitting down? No traffic? Full power! The sudden intake roar, 275hp to the beautiful Duoprop. The stern dug in, we started to climb out onto the plane again... bump. Vibration. Nothing spectacular. Power off and engine off and tilt the drive up and it's a different story. The Volvo Duoprop was pretzeled. Fortunately it still provided some drive. So we crawled all the way back at low speed. Post mortem found that not only were the props bent but the inner shaft was also bent.

Suddenly it was all my fault, and I happily offered to pay to fix the thing, but John wouldn't hear of that. So I asked him the drive model, intending to just send him the parts. He knew he was in the wrong and wouldn't hear of that. After a few days his wife told him "you know it was your own fault, stop being a jerk about it" and that was the end of the matter.

Back home I checked the charts. That day on the lake there was only a straight shot through five sets of buoys, but where I went straight ahead there should have been a sixth set offset marking a slight dogleg to port. Well. There you go. We should have taken the safe route. That incident gave me an abiding love of jet drives.
I've found out the hard way that everything you thought you knew goes out the window after Labor Day. Rocks that you never thought were even there suddenly appear.
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