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Old 08-24-2019, 12:37 PM   #1
TheProfessor
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Default Cob Webs on Trees

Some sort of caterpillar makes these webs on trees.

Anyone know how to prevent these for next year?
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Old 08-24-2019, 01:59 PM   #2
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Some sort of caterpillar makes these webs on trees.

Anyone know how to prevent these for next year?
Usually, these are gypsy moth caterpillars.
Burn these with a torch so they won’t hatch and next year spread Tree Tanglefoot around each trunk. It’s sticky stuff that stops them climbing the trunk to get to the branches where they make their “webs”
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Old 08-24-2019, 02:38 PM   #3
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Usually, these are gypsy moth caterpillars.
Burn these with a torch so they won’t hatch and next year spread Tree Tanglefoot around each trunk. It’s sticky stuff that stops them climbing the trunk to get to the branches where they make their “webs”
Seems like quite a few of them up this way this year. Been cleaning their little black poop off the deck all week. Back in the early 80's there were so many down in mass, that you could literally hear them chewing the leaves
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:11 PM   #4
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Usually, these are gypsy moth caterpillars.
Burn these with a torch so they won’t hatch and next year spread Tree Tanglefoot around each trunk. It’s sticky stuff that stops them climbing the trunk to get to the branches where they make their “webs”
Not Gypsy moths. They are web worm moths , while unsightly and a mess they are far less destructive and don’t harm healthy trees.Gypsy moths defoliate huge areas of hardwood forest and kill many trees in the process.
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Old 08-24-2019, 05:22 PM   #5
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Seems like quite a few of them up this way this year. Been cleaning their little black poop off the deck all week. Back in the early 80's there were so many down in mass, that you could literally hear them chewing the leaves
I remember going tent camping and the “guano” was all over everything...then it rained and the guano literally exploded into little ****balls that smeared if you touched them. Thousands (probably millions) l of hardwood trees were defoliated. Nasty times.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:43 PM   #6
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Some sort of caterpillar makes these webs on trees.

Anyone know how to prevent these for next year?
Have a licensed Arborist spray your trees in the spring.....
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:43 PM   #7
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They are cat and nine tales. Gypsy moths are in the spring. Cut off as many branches that make the nest and throw in a small Fire. This kills the eggs repeat next year till gone


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Old 09-07-2019, 12:14 PM   #8
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Smile Hardwood Trees are High-Maintenance...

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I remember going tent camping and the “guano” was all over everything...then it rained and the guano literally exploded into little ****balls that smeared if you touched them. Thousands (probably millions) l of hardwood trees were defoliated. Nasty times.
Too many newbies to New Hampshire cut down White Pines, which are not affected by tent caterpillars. Newbies lose the pleasing scent and a blanket of pine needles—no maintenance for mulch needed. Tree-cutters will encourage Pine tree removals, as cut Pines are worth some money!

Retained on the north side of lots, White or Red Pines help to block cold north winter winds when hardwoods have lost their leaves. Where there's an opening to the sun, Pines are fast-growing, grow to 130+ feet tall, last 200+ years, regularly drop excellent kindling for woodstoves, resist most tree diseases, don't attract deer, don't carry ticks, and are native to NH.

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Old 09-07-2019, 05:31 PM   #9
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Too many newbies to New Hampshire cut down White Pines, which are not affected by tent caterpillars. Newbies lose the pleasing scent and a blanket of pine needles—no maintenance for mulch needed. Tree-cutters will encourage Pine tree removals, as cut Pines are worth some money!

Retained on the north side of lots, White or Red Pines help to block cold north winter winds when hardwoods have lost their leaves. Where there's an opening to the sun, Pines are fast-growing, grow to 130+ feet tall, last 200+ years, regularly drop excellent kindling for woodstoves, resist most tree diseases, don't attract deer, don't carry ticks, and are native to NH.

My “yard” must have 200 pines of various height from 30 to 50 feet tall.
They form a 30’ border on the northeast side of my property and they are a great privacy fence and attract ruffed grouse.
The back acres of woods have a few of those old growth huge pines of 3 foot diameter. I like pines! The rest is beech and maple with some red oak thrown in.
No caterpillars in the pines!
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