Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > Winni Wildlife
Home Forums Gallery Blogs YouTube Channel Classifieds Links Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-22-2010, 10:18 AM   #1
Airedale1
Senior Member
 
Airedale1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Laconia
Posts: 592
Thanks: 555
Thanked 1,550 Times in 274 Posts
Default Coyote

Here's one from April of 2006 taken in Gilmanton. We sure have healthy looking Coyotes here.

__________________
"The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit." Nelson Henderson (1865-1943)
Airedale1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 10:48 AM   #2
Pepper
Senior Member
 
Pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Laconia, NH
Posts: 1,284
Thanks: 409
Thanked 155 Times in 40 Posts
Default

Wow, what a beautiful photo. When we lived out in Belmont we would hear the coyotes frequently at night. I miss that!
__________________
Never waste time lamenting what was. Simply celebrate what is!
Pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 10:50 AM   #3
Yosemite Sam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Lakes Region
Posts: 395
Thanks: 81
Thanked 95 Times in 56 Posts
Default

It looks more like a northern wolf or coydog to me.



A coyote has ears that are pointed and proportionately large in relation to the head.

Yosemite Sam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 11:02 AM   #4
Lakesrider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 380
Thanked 1,016 Times in 345 Posts
Default

Yeah definitely not a Coyote...More Wolf. Coyotes have a much thinner face than the one in your picture. Could be a cross of some type. People say they see wolves around these parts. I'd love to.....
Lakesrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 11:02 AM   #5
Jonas Pilot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire is my home, 24-7-365
Posts: 1,686
Thanks: 1,047
Thanked 336 Times in 189 Posts
Default Probably a coyote.

Coyotes are generalists, eating whatever food is seasonally abundant. Coyotes are known to feed on mice, squirrels, woodchucks, snowshoe hare, fawns, house cats, carrion, amphibians, garbage, insects and fruit. Coyotes utilize forested habitats, shrubby open fields, marshy areas and river valleys.

The Eastern coyote is a social animal that generally selects a lifelong mate. Coyotes are quite vocal during their January to March breeding season. Both parents care for their young, occasionally with the assistance of older offspring. Four to eight pups are born in early May.

Within a year some pups will disperse long distances to find their own territories, while other offspring may remain with their parents and form a small pack.

Territories range in size from 5-25 square miles and are usually shared by a mated pair and occasionally their offspring. Coyotes mark and defend their territories against other unrelated coyotes and sometimes against other canid species. Coyotes are capable of many distinct vocalizations - the yipping of youngsters, barks to indicate a threat, long howls used to bring pack members together, and group yip-howls issued when pack members reunite.

Domestic dog/ coyote hybrids, referred to as coydogs, are usually born in the winter. Since domestic dogs that manage to pair with a female coyote do not remain with her to assist in parental care, the young rarely survive. DNA sampling of coyote tissue in the Northeast shows no coyote/dog crosses. However, they do have a mixture of wolf DNA.

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/Wild...ern_coyote.htm

http://northernwoodlands.org/outside...ing_for_wolves
Jonas Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jonas Pilot For This Useful Post:
Airedale1 (12-29-2010), Pepper (12-23-2010)
Sponsored Links
Old 12-22-2010, 11:39 AM   #6
Yosemite Sam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Lakes Region
Posts: 395
Thanks: 81
Thanked 95 Times in 56 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonas Pilot View Post
Coyotes are generalists, eating whatever food is seasonally abundant. Coyotes are known to feed on mice, squirrels, woodchucks, snowshoe hare, fawns, house cats, carrion, amphibians, garbage, insects and fruit. Coyotes utilize forested habitats, shrubby open fields, marshy areas and river valleys.

The Eastern coyote is a social animal that generally selects a lifelong mate. Coyotes are quite vocal during their January to March breeding season. Both parents care for their young, occasionally with the assistance of older offspring. Four to eight pups are born in early May.

Within a year some pups will disperse long distances to find their own territories, while other offspring may remain with their parents and form a small pack.

Territories range in size from 5-25 square miles and are usually shared by a mated pair and occasionally their offspring. Coyotes mark and defend their territories against other unrelated coyotes and sometimes against other canid species. Coyotes are capable of many distinct vocalizations - the yipping of youngsters, barks to indicate a threat, long howls used to bring pack members together, and group yip-howls issued when pack members reunite.

Domestic dog/ coyote hybrids, referred to as coydogs, are usually born in the winter. Since domestic dogs that manage to pair with a female coyote do not remain with her to assist in parental care, the young rarely survive. DNA sampling of coyote tissue in the Northeast shows no coyote/dog crosses. However, they do have a mixture of wolf DNA.

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/Wild...ern_coyote.htm

http://northernwoodlands.org/outside...ing_for_wolves

Could it be that the Wolves are in NH now? I found this on the Wolves website that you posted:

"It seemed that the only thing that stood in the way of wolf reintroduction in the Northeast was political will. In 1999, the State legislature of New Hampshire expressed its will by passing a law forbidding the reintroduction of wolves to that state.

But nature has its own will. In 2002, wolves were killed in Canada just 20 miles from the New Hampshire border. Then, 10 miles from the border, fish and wildlife officials asked Vermont hunters be on the lookout for wolves in northern Vermont.

Since then, there have been several years of poor weather conditions for tracking wolves. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s budget has been cut time and again. The Endangered Species Act, the legal foundation for the wolf’s reintroduction, became endangered itself."
Yosemite Sam is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Yosemite Sam For This Useful Post:
Old 12-22-2010, 04:49 PM   #7
MarkinNH
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 392
Thanks: 177
Thanked 146 Times in 76 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite Sam View Post
It looks more like a northern wolf or coydog to me.

A coyote has ears that are pointed and proportionately large in relation to the head.
Given the picture, it would have to be a very well groomed and fed coydog, they are typically more mangier looking then the animal in the picture. I have to lean more towards a wolf then a coydog. One thing for sure is that it isn't a coyote.
Still it is a beautiful picture.
MarkinNH is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MarkinNH For This Useful Post:
Old 12-22-2010, 08:31 PM   #8
Jonas Pilot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire is my home, 24-7-365
Posts: 1,686
Thanks: 1,047
Thanked 336 Times in 189 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonas Pilot View Post
Coyotes are generalists, eating whatever food is seasonally abundant. Coyotes are known to feed on mice, squirrels, woodchucks, snowshoe hare, fawns, house cats, carrion, amphibians, garbage, insects and fruit. Coyotes utilize forested habitats, shrubby open fields, marshy areas and river valleys.

The Eastern coyote is a social animal that generally selects a lifelong mate. Coyotes are quite vocal during their January to March breeding season. Both parents care for their young, occasionally with the assistance of older offspring. Four to eight pups are born in early May.

Within a year some pups will disperse long distances to find their own territories, while other offspring may remain with their parents and form a small pack.

Territories range in size from 5-25 square miles and are usually shared by a mated pair and occasionally their offspring. Coyotes mark and defend their territories against other unrelated coyotes and sometimes against other canid species. Coyotes are capable of many distinct vocalizations - the yipping of youngsters, barks to indicate a threat, long howls used to bring pack members together, and group yip-howls issued when pack members reunite.

Domestic dog/ coyote hybrids, referred to as coydogs, are usually born in the winter. Since domestic dogs that manage to pair with a female coyote do not remain with her to assist in parental care, the young rarely survive. DNA sampling of coyote tissue in the Northeast shows no coyote/dog crosses. However, they do have a mixture of wolf DNA.

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/Wild...ern_coyote.htm

http://northernwoodlands.org/outside...ing_for_wolves
http://lethalapp.com/news/2009/04/wo...als-skeptical/

http://ecohearth.com/component/conte...-in-maine.html

Maybe it's a chupacabra?
Jonas Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Jonas Pilot For This Useful Post:
VitaBene (12-24-2010)
Old 12-27-2010, 06:52 AM   #9
Soapmistress
Member
 
Soapmistress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 47
Thanks: 8
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonas Pilot View Post


Maybe it's a chupacabra?

..........
Soapmistress is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Soapmistress For This Useful Post:
Old 12-27-2010, 02:51 PM   #10
Long Island Baba
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 73
Thanks: 1
Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Default Whatever they are.....

they are roaming on Long Island! A bit scary. We have all commented that the deer and fox population seem to have diminished and have pointed to this animal as likely culprit.
No threat to humans? Sig on board regardless.
Long Island Baba is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Long Island Baba For This Useful Post:
Old 12-27-2010, 03:09 PM   #11
Nagigator
Senior Member
 
Nagigator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Central Ma.
Posts: 265
Thanks: 217
Thanked 42 Times in 34 Posts
Default Central Mass, too

I had one of those creatures in Airdale's photo cross my rural road right in front of me and my dog about two months ago. It was very quick, my Lab didn't even see it, she had her head down a chipper hole. It was maybe 30ft away, I said "Oh, my.....", and BOOM, into the bushes on the other side of the street. It was a much better looking animal than the coyotes I see frequently, I asssumed it was a wolf, or hybrid. Didn't even have time to get rattled..........
Nagigator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 06:48 PM   #12
ApS
Senior Member
 
ApS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Winnipesaukee & Florida
Posts: 4,493
Thanks: 929
Thanked 433 Times in 317 Posts
Post Near the Hanger—Out in the Open...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Long Island Baba View Post
they are roaming on Long Island! A bit scary. We have all commented that the deer and fox population seem to have diminished and have pointed to this animal as likely culprit.
No threat to humans? Sig on board regardless.
This Friday, I saw one trotting across Moultonborough's Airport, and had plenty of time to point him out to my passengers.
ApS is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2012, 02:51 PM   #13
lake king
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 12
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

That is one big coyote
lake king is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 05:28 PM   #14
bclaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Laconia
Posts: 479
Thanks: 545
Thanked 145 Times in 66 Posts
Default

Dancing Brook Lodge in Alexandria, NH raises wolf hybrids. Wonder if some of them migjht have gotten loose.

http://dancingbrookelodge.org/aboutus.html
bclaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 09:09 AM   #15
dayvsea
Senior Member
 
dayvsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 105
Thanks: 37
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

That is a wolf face no doubt.. Coyote has more of a fox countenance to it.. You can see the cheeky look of a wolf..
__________________
"Honesty is the best policy."
dayvsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 01:41 PM   #16
Airedale1
Senior Member
 
Airedale1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Laconia
Posts: 592
Thanks: 555
Thanked 1,550 Times in 274 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dayvsea View Post
That is a wolf face no doubt.. Coyote has more of a fox countenance to it.. You can see the cheeky look of a wolf..
I am no expert, so I had one look at my image and this was his answer:

"Hi Paul,

The animal photographed, in this magnificent photo, is an eastern coyote. Eastern coyotes have wolf genetics, thus is a "cross" considering an evolutionary biologist stand point.

My identification is based on the ear to head proportion, head size, nose shape and ear shape. I also used the beech leaves as an approximate scale.

Given the animals robust size and body shape I can understand why some would believe the animal is wolf. However it is not the body size and shape that assist biologist with wild canid identification. Given that eastern coyotes are a cross of western coyote/wolf genetics, a large coyote can look wolf like and a small wolf can look coyote like. Thus, biologist look at the details I used above.

Another identifier of coyote versus wolf is the animals tail use when moving. Wolves point the tail straight out when moving, eastern coyotes keep the tail down. I could not use this identifier as it appears the animal was standing still when photographed.

Sincerely,

Patrick Tate
New Hampshire Fish & Game Department
Furbearer Project Leader
Region 3 Wildlife Biologist
225 Main St, Durham NH, 03824"
__________________
"The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit." Nelson Henderson (1865-1943)
Airedale1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Airedale1 For This Useful Post:
SteveA (02-05-2012)
Old 02-05-2012, 02:56 PM   #17
Slickcraft
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Welch Island and West Alton
Posts: 2,550
Thanks: 808
Thanked 1,402 Times in 644 Posts
Default Eastern Coyote

There was an article on the eastern coyote on page A3 of this week's Gilford Steamer.
http://www.newhampshirelakesandmount...2012.02.02.pdf
Slickcraft is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Slickcraft For This Useful Post:
Greene's Basin Girl (02-06-2012), Jonas Pilot (02-05-2012), SteveA (02-06-2012)
Old 02-06-2012, 08:13 AM   #18
SteveA
Deceased Member
 
SteveA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Gilford, NH
Posts: 2,311
Thanks: 1,070
Thanked 2,053 Times in 496 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slickcraft View Post
There was an article on the eastern coyote on page A3 of this week's Gilford Steamer.
http://www.newhampshirelakesandmount...2012.02.02.pdf
Thanks for the post. Very informative article. Interesting that the author is the same person that responded to Airedale1.
__________________
"Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in his shoes. That way, if he gets angry he'll be a mile away and barefoot!" unknown
SteveA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 09:06 AM   #19
Belmont Resident
Senior Member
 
Belmont Resident's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Belmont NH but prefer Jackman Maine
Posts: 1,857
Thanks: 491
Thanked 409 Times in 251 Posts
Thumbs down Coyote's

They do not like them in North country

Name:  034-225x300.jpg
Views: 1951
Size:  34.6 KB

Not sure if anyone has seen what coyote will do to a deer.
__________________
"better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, then a long life spent in a miserable way.."
Belmont Resident is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 09:38 PM   #20
Belmont Resident
Senior Member
 
Belmont Resident's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Belmont NH but prefer Jackman Maine
Posts: 1,857
Thanks: 491
Thanked 409 Times in 251 Posts
Default Whole bunch hanging out.

28 coyotes hanging out. Passed this on Rt 201 heading to Jackman.
They do not like coyotes up there at all.

Name:  Coyotes 2 - Version 2.jpg
Views: 1920
Size:  152.1 KB
__________________
"better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, then a long life spent in a miserable way.."
Belmont Resident is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 12:07 PM   #21
SAB1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rowley MA / Tuftonboro
Posts: 738
Thanks: 107
Thanked 172 Times in 126 Posts
Default

Nice picture of the hangin pole. Wackem all. With no real predators of them they multiply fast and they love to eat dogs, cats and fawns. Talk to farmer and see how they ravage corn too.
SAB1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SAB1 For This Useful Post:
Belmont Resident (02-09-2012)
Old 02-09-2012, 08:15 AM   #22
Belmont Resident
Senior Member
 
Belmont Resident's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Belmont NH but prefer Jackman Maine
Posts: 1,857
Thanks: 491
Thanked 409 Times in 251 Posts
Default coyote

They also kill large deer and moose.
Many have not seen what a coyote will do to a large deer or moose. They will not kill the animal but prefer run it down, wear it out then take chunks off of the animal until it dies, in essence eating it to death. Yes pretty gory details but 100% the truth. We have witnessed this fist hand while riding our snowmobiles and it is something I will never forget. The deer actually ran up to us and stood by us as the pack waited just beyond the lights of our snowmobiles, we had no choice but to ride away leaving it to its fate.
Coyotes are multiplying and have been taking a toll on the deer and Moose populations of both NH and ME for many years now.
Just this week they have been on the news down in Mass.
2 years ago a hunter was checking his bear bait located on our property. He was attacked by 2 coyotes who did not want him near the bait. He got a bullet into both. Not sure weather they lived or not. Hopefully they suffered.
__________________
"better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, then a long life spent in a miserable way.."
Belmont Resident is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 12:14 PM   #23
SAB1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rowley MA / Tuftonboro
Posts: 738
Thanks: 107
Thanked 172 Times in 126 Posts
Default

Name:  Coyote mauling.jpg
Views: 1565
Size:  13.1 KB

Just like this
SAB1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SAB1 For This Useful Post:
Belmont Resident (02-09-2012)
Old 02-09-2012, 01:50 PM   #24
Belmont Resident
Senior Member
 
Belmont Resident's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Belmont NH but prefer Jackman Maine
Posts: 1,857
Thanks: 491
Thanked 409 Times in 251 Posts
Default Not dogs

A lot of people are under the impression they are cute little wild dogs.
They are just the opposite, they are killers, and they have gone after small children and attacked adults.
That picture is exactly what it looks like when they feed on a deer, thanks for sharing.
Friend of mine had to put the electric collar on his huge German Sheppard to keep him from going into the woods after the pack that has been down off Blackbrook Rd. on the Sanbornton end.
__________________
"better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, then a long life spent in a miserable way.."
Belmont Resident is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 02:03 PM   #25
Jonas Pilot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire is my home, 24-7-365
Posts: 1,686
Thanks: 1,047
Thanked 336 Times in 189 Posts
Default Humans or coyotes?

"They are just the opposite, they are killers, and they have gone after small children and attacked adults." BR
Jonas Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 02:29 PM   #26
Belmont Resident
Senior Member
 
Belmont Resident's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Belmont NH but prefer Jackman Maine
Posts: 1,857
Thanks: 491
Thanked 409 Times in 251 Posts
Wink Great point

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonas Pilot View Post
"They are just the opposite, they are killers, and they have gone after small children and attacked adults." BR
Still laughing! Yes unfortunately a lot like today society.
__________________
"better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, then a long life spent in a miserable way.."
Belmont Resident is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 03:11 PM   #27
Jonas Pilot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire is my home, 24-7-365
Posts: 1,686
Thanks: 1,047
Thanked 336 Times in 189 Posts
Default

I wasn't trying to be funny.
Jonas Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 12:46 PM   #28
BoSox711
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Time to pull out the shotgun
BoSox711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.12482 seconds