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Old 03-27-2019, 12:10 PM   #1
Josh K
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Default Paint Protection for Your Boat

Hey everyone,

My name is Josh and I知 currently a senior at Bentley University and a frequent boater up on Lake Winnipesaukee.

I知 currently the leader of a venture that is working towards taking paint protection film technology to the boating industry. The idea is to use clear, adhesive, nearly invisible, paint protection film, similar to that used by companies such as 3M and XPEL, but more durable, that will be able to withstand damages that are all too common for us boaters. The film will be computer cut to the exact specifications of the hull and installed above the water line all the way from the stern to the bow. The goal is to make the film durable enough to withstand damages from coming in contact with or rubbing up against a dock or another boat, or even simply from small scratches and scrapes caused by everyday use, as well as to protect against fading from the sun.

I understand how expensive boating is, and as we all know, one of a boaters worst nightmares is to do damage to the paint or gel coat of his boat. Right now, I知 in the stages of conducting market research trying to determine the size of the market for such a product, as well as working on developing a pricing strategy. My goal is to test the film on a handful of different vessels on Winnipesaukee this coming summer to get a better idea for the durability and practicality for such a product.

I知 curious in hearing any thoughts, recommendations, or concerns, as well if this is something that you might be interested in. I appreciate your time and I値l do my best to answer any questions that you might have.

-Josh
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Old 03-27-2019, 12:15 PM   #2
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Hi Josh
I am a 03 Bentley grad and would love to help you out with info or concerns. Have been a boater a long time, although not as long as many of our forum members, but have been around the ocean and lake alot.
I have been considering a ceramic coat for the best part of two years and have always wondered about an alternative. Would love to talk.

PM me
Thank you
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Old 03-27-2019, 01:10 PM   #3
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Default class of 87

'87 grad here, son currently a freshman, great school!

Some thoughts for you:
- have more and more friends who are doing the same with their cars so maybe the technology is out and/or they have already broken into the market.
- based on how it appears to protect these cars, I could see it as an easy add-on for new boat purchases, possibly you get it into the marinas as a commission sale item
- personally wouldn't consider it for an older, used boat due to cost/benefit. A lot easier to sell it on a new boat and protect a factory fresh finish.
- definitely has to be durable enough to handle day to day bumps and dings
- even though its above the water line, it may need to have some anti-fungal property to it since the lowest portion will be wet quite often.
- any thoughts on how slippery it would be wet and/or dry? that may limit you to just the non-human contact portion of the hull

Good luck!
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Old 03-27-2019, 01:29 PM   #4
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I think you should talk to the marina's on lake. That's something that would probably be installed on a new boat before it leaves the showroom.
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Old 03-27-2019, 05:39 PM   #5
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I assume you are talking about something similar to those clear wraps they put on cars? I see in your post it says above the waterline, but what about below it? I would think that would be a real nice alternative to bottom painting for those in a salt water environment. A lot of people won't buy a bottom painted boat so there would definitely be value to the boat owner/future prospective buyers. Be interested to know how long it would last but like the concept of peeling it back if you ever went to sell it. Also be interested to know what, if any, impact on the gelcoat it would have.
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Old 03-27-2019, 06:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDweller View Post
I assume you are talking about something similar to those clear wraps they put on cars? I see in your post it says above the waterline, but what about below it? I would think that would be a real nice alternative to bottom painting for those in a salt water environment. A lot of people won't buy a bottom painted boat so there would definitely be value to the boat owner/future prospective buyers. Be interested to know how long it would last but like the concept of peeling it back if you ever went to sell it. Also be interested to know what, if any, impact on the gelcoat it would have.
X2!! Although I agree that "new", (and "classic") boats on fresh water would be a prime target, I think salt water boater's would be willing to stand in line (for a long time!!) for a product like this...
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Old 03-27-2019, 10:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by feb View Post
'87 grad here, son currently a freshman, great school!

Some thoughts for you:
- have more and more friends who are doing the same with their cars so maybe the technology is out and/or they have already broken into the market.
- based on how it appears to protect these cars, I could see it as an easy add-on for new boat purchases, possibly you get it into the marinas as a commission sale item
- personally wouldn't consider it for an older, used boat due to cost/benefit. A lot easier to sell it on a new boat and protect a factory fresh finish.
- definitely has to be durable enough to handle day to day bumps and dings
- even though its above the water line, it may need to have some anti-fungal property to it since the lowest portion will be wet quite often.
- any thoughts on how slippery it would be wet and/or dry? that may limit you to just the non-human contact portion of the hull

Good luck!
I've been doing a lot of research into the automotive paint protection market, and while the product is similar, boats experience a lot more wear and tear from rubbing up against docks, fenders, etc., as well as being exposed to wetness for a long period of time (the film on a car doesn't stay wet for an extended period of time). The main difference between the film used for automotive purposes and for marine purposes will be in the durability and its ability to withstand a higher level of damage.

At the moment, we only plan on providing the film for the non-human contact portions of the hull; however, this is something that could change in the future.

Good luck to your son over the next three years, it's a challenging school but well worth it in the end!
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Old 03-27-2019, 10:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDweller View Post
I assume you are talking about something similar to those clear wraps they put on cars? I see in your post it says above the waterline, but what about below it? I would think that would be a real nice alternative to bottom painting for those in a salt water environment. A lot of people won't buy a bottom painted boat so there would definitely be value to the boat owner/future prospective buyers. Be interested to know how long it would last but like the concept of peeling it back if you ever went to sell it. Also be interested to know what, if any, impact on the gelcoat it would have.
Yes, very similar to the clear wraps they put on cars, the main difference being the durability. As to your point about applying the film below the waterline, I actually had a Professor I was working with recommend the same idea. I reached out to a company who uses current 3M technology for that purpose to get an idea of how the product would hold up being constantly submerged under water, and they said that it only holds up if the boat is stored out of the water. Either way, this is definitely something that I want to look into, as I know how much bottom paint can hurt the resale value of a boat. As for the impact on the gel coat, as long as heat is applied when being removed, there should be absolutely no damage. This adhesive technology is used on all different types of cars with absolutely no issue when it comes to paint damage.
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Old 03-27-2019, 11:11 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Biggd View Post
I think you should talk to the marina's on lake. That's something that would probably be installed on a new boat before it leaves the showroom.
That is exactly what we plan to do. We are exploring three main revenue streams for the product. The first being a simple pre-cut kit that a customer can order, have shipped to their house, and install themselves. This would obviously be the cheapest option, yet also the most difficult for the customer, although I imagine with the right tools and some patience, many people could do a decent job installing the product themselves.

The second revenue stream that we are exploring is by having the product installed at certified installation locations across the country. SeaDek operates in a similar fashion, having certified installers at various locations around the country, who are trained to complete a professional installation of the product. The link below provides more information on how they do this if anybody is interested:

http://www.seadek.com/blog/seadek-ex...aller-network/

The final revenue stream and the one that I am most excited about is exactly what you mentioned. We want to have this product as an option when speccing out a brand new boat. This idea was also taken out of SeaDek's playbook, as for most new boats, you have the option of having SeaDek installed straight from the factory. This way, customer's can rest easy knowing that their hull is fully protected straight from the factory, and don't have to worry about putting a nice white scratch in their brand new black hull (something my Dad and I had the pleasure of doing last summer, and one of the catalysts for this idea).
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Old 03-28-2019, 12:00 AM   #10
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Default Maybe the manufacturers?

This sounds like the total cost to get it on a boat after market would be high for less expensive or older boats. Now, thats fine, because I think the initial market here is for the newer & more expensive boats. The lowest overall cost & complexity would be to have boat builders install it at the factory. I have a 60k+ boat on order and I would have been more likely to have considered this as a factory option as opposed to an additional aftermarket install.
Although...I am buying all my gps/sonars & troll motor & batteries myself to save on over inflated 'factory' charges for the same items vs off the shelf. Maybe factory installation would be marked up vs marina after market install.
I probably would not have even considered this on a less expensive boat.
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Old 03-28-2019, 07:05 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh K View Post
That is exactly what we plan to do. We are exploring three main revenue streams for the product. The first being a simple pre-cut kit that a customer can order, have shipped to their house, and install themselves. This would obviously be the cheapest option, yet also the most difficult for the customer, although I imagine with the right tools and some patience, many people could do a decent job installing the product themselves.

The second revenue stream that we are exploring is by having the product installed at certified installation locations across the country. SeaDek operates in a similar fashion, having certified installers at various locations around the country, who are trained to complete a professional installation of the product. The link below provides more information on how they do this if anybody is interested:

http://www.seadek.com/blog/seadek-ex...aller-network/

The final revenue stream and the one that I am most excited about is exactly what you mentioned. We want to have this product as an option when speccing out a brand new boat. This idea was also taken out of SeaDek's playbook, as for most new boats, you have the option of having SeaDek installed straight from the factory. This way, customer's can rest easy knowing that their hull is fully protected straight from the factory, and don't have to worry about putting a nice white scratch in their brand new black hull (something my Dad and I had the pleasure of doing last summer, and one of the catalysts for this idea).
It's also an easier sell on a new boat where it's installed at the marina because they can roll the cost into the loan payment.
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Old 03-28-2019, 12:41 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh K View Post
That is exactly what we plan to do. We are exploring three main revenue streams for the product. The first being a simple pre-cut kit that a customer can order, have shipped to their house, and install themselves. This would obviously be the cheapest option, yet also the most difficult for the customer, although I imagine with the right tools and some patience, many people could do a decent job installing the product themselves.

The second revenue stream that we are exploring is by having the product installed at certified installation locations across the country. SeaDek operates in a similar fashion, having certified installers at various locations around the country, who are trained to complete a professional installation of the product. The link below provides more information on how they do this if anybody is interested:

http://www.seadek.com/blog/seadek-ex...aller-network/

The final revenue stream and the one that I am most excited about is exactly what you mentioned. We want to have this product as an option when speccing out a brand new boat. This idea was also taken out of SeaDek's playbook, as for most new boats, you have the option of having SeaDek installed straight from the factory. This way, customer's can rest easy knowing that their hull is fully protected straight from the factory, and don't have to worry about putting a nice white scratch in their brand new black hull (something my Dad and I had the pleasure of doing last summer, and one of the catalysts for this idea).
Honestly having watched a lot of Shark Tank.... I think if you were to create something that does work and has some market value those guys and gals might say the following:

Very niche and vertical market. Start up costs would be huge think about Marketing, manufacturing, distribution. Profit margins would have to be huge because you have a niche low volume target market. Providing pre-cut patterns for every hull design out there alone may be cost prohibitive.

You'd absolutely need to have a patent on it.

Frankly I think you're best bet would be to license it out and take a passive per unit % in perpetuity and let a bigger fish that is well positioned with the marketing, distribution and manufacturing already in place take it.


Good luck - I have a lot of admiration for any entrepreneur. Could make you millions and if it does that's freaking awesome!
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Old 03-28-2019, 04:09 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAXUM
...Frankly I think you're best bet would be to license it out and take a passive per unit % in perpetuity and let a bigger fish that is well positioned with the marketing, distribution and manufacturing already in place take it.

Good luck - I have a lot of admiration for any entrepreneur. Could make you millions and if it does that's freaking awesome!
I agree with MAXUM. I recall in the 70's after market rustproofing of cars TuffKote-Dinol; Rusty Jones, etc). It was sold by independent, licensed, trained dealers. To build volume they sold the service to dealers at a discount and lost their margins. Then the dealers bought the franchises and then the manufacturers started redesigning the cars and the structural materials. That was the end of rustproofing.

As a used boat owner, I imagine I would have to spend a considerable fund to re-do my Awlgrip, and then ?? to apply the film.
My last boat was about 25 years old when I sold it. No significant scratches etc in the gelcoat, but the colored trim was faded and we easily repainted it. My current boat is Awlgripped, and I'm assuming no other owner redid the Awlgrip. It looks very nice for a 20 year old boat.

If I trailered my boat, or kept it on a lift, the risk of dock damage is minimal, same with valet or a slip with whips or 4 way tie.
I think the market would be better where boats are tied to floating docks for long periods, a small market.
If you can patent the process and license it to a vendor who already deals wit several manufacturers, or to a high end manufacturer that might be viable market.

Will it work on wooden boats? Something that protects varnish from sunw and elements and age would be super.
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Old 03-29-2019, 10:33 AM   #14
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I meant to post this last night.... as mentioned earlier how about something BELOW the waterline?

Seems there is a patent on file ironically assigned - whatever that means - to Brunswick Corp for a plastic anti-fouling film for boats.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6607826.html


Filed in 1999 and published in 2003, I've never seen such a product but the patent is out there.
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Old 04-02-2019, 01:20 PM   #15
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Hi Josh -
I worked for a company that manufactured this film for many years. It is great stuff and expensive to make. I have used it on my boat for years. The outer edge of the swim platform. Side of the boat where my tie on bumper would rub, and anywhere that could get scratched or scuffed. I even had it on my outdrives and on spots on the bottom of the hull. Just to see if it would last.
The great thing about it is its clear and can be waxed, so most do not know its there. When time comes to sell, I can leave it on or peel off and it looks new.

The current thickness has worked fine and would be more cost effective for alot of uses. Look into what the vinyl wrap world is doing as well as they will speak of also protecting the surface.

Going thicker on the swim platform would work better as I have needed to double up there. However, conforming to curves will be the tougher battle.
Keep doing your homework. Will it stop the boat from chalking? How many buff and waxes would be done to a boat over say 5 years. How would it reflect on resale. For me I would think about doing it on the sides of a new boat if it saved me the buffing costs, didn't chalk out and got my money back at resale value and if it sold quicker than one in less condition.

Good luck!
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