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Old 08-12-2009, 09:06 AM   #1
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Default A thought I had last night, Kinda harsh...

Some people are naturally good at working with machines; you know the type, they can easily figure out how to operate a backhoe, a snowmobile, a table saw, an arc welder, a wakeboard, a motorcycle, an ATV, a car with a stick-shift, etc. There's something in them that makes these tasks intuitive, easy and fun for them. The smarter ones also tend to try to improve their skills and knowledge, since the basic operation comes easily. If you enjoy docking a boat in the wind, or have a airplane pilot's license, I bet you are one of these folks. There's also people who simply lack these skills. Learing how to control a machine is simply frightening for them. You can try to teach them, and they can get proficient enough to make do, but they never really master things mechanical becuase they expend so much brain power and effort to simply deal with basic operation.

I've taught many people how to ride motorcycles over the years, and there's some folks who simply have no business ever getting on one, no matter how much they practice or how hard they try. They will never be good and they will always be nervous and scared. The smart ones give up because riding is simply dangerous for them. The dumber ones often think they are skilled and ride anyway. Sadly, many of them get injured or die in easily preventable motorcycle accidents.

There's a concept in teaching motorcycle riding called the 90/10 rule. When you first start, 90 percent of your attention is devoted to operating the machine, 10 percent is used for everything else (like not dying). This is why parking lot practice, at the start, is a really good idea. As you become proficient, the roles reverse, so that you can devote 90% of your attention (or more) to everything but operating the machine. Some people never get there.

I keep hearing about how crazy the lake is this year (I have not really noticed a difference, but I boat almost exclusively on weekdays). I also keep hearing how the lake feels so much safer this year that many people that used to be too frightened to use the lake are finally getting out to enjoy it (I'm not really convinced of this either, but...) In my experience, the lake at it's worst crowd-wise, is still a very mellow place to boat compared to ther places I've boated. If boating on Winnipesuakee prior to the speed limit HONESTLY did scare some people, perhaps those same people lack the skills to boat safely. Can't help but wonder if these formerly frightened people are some of the same Captain Boneheads I keep hearing about. Kinda fits, no?

That said, I'm sure there are plenty of skilled people out there who simply don't care about boating safely. I bet they'd be a large percentage of Captain Boneheads as well.
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:45 AM   #2
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Default nothing harsh

Great post. You were able to put in words a concise and plausible explanation that explains why some things just happen. I was thinking the bonehead maneuvers were done by people with little experience. I thought they are overcome by trying to process too much information at once and making choices missing some data. But after reading your post it explains how some of the bonehead moves are done be old-timers that have been on the lake for years. It is impossible to make laws that can test for aptitude
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:55 AM   #3
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Dave R. excellent post.... I know it makes me think about things a little differently....

I have been boating so long operating the boat is like second nature to me, reading the water and wave and not slamming the boat around just kind of happens naturally.... leaving me much more alert to look around an pay attention to boat traffic etc.

And sure as you said there are the people that just don't give a dam, but there are those people that are caught up learning to boat that spend a lot of time focusing on the boat handling and not on everything else going on around them.....

There is definately a 90/10 thing going on for sure.....

Now as for docking..... come on I thought everyone loved to dock????????
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Old 08-12-2009, 11:27 AM   #4
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Exclamation All Those For Bringing Anarchy Back to Winnipesaukee...SAY AYE!

Quote:
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"...The smarter ones also tend to try to improve their skills and knowledge, since the basic operation comes easily..."
1) All you need is a key. (And a big loan).

2) Too bad nobody here avails themselves of the traveling high-speed-high-performance training courses—such as Tres Martin's School in Performance Boating.

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"...There's also people who simply lack these skills..."
Every GFBL speedster "drives" their boat at an "above-average" skill level. (Don'cha'know).

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"...Sadly, many of them get injured or die in easily preventable motorcycle accidents..."
That the operator dies has NOT been the case on Winnipesaukee.

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"...I have not really noticed a difference, but I boat almost exclusively on weekdays. ..."
1) Try living (and observing) here weekdays and weekends. There's this perception issue of our "trailer-boaters".

2) As you probably read previously, I instruct race car drivers on various closed tracks.

Some, I'm happy to say, have gone on to instruct other drivers.

3) Thanks to my use of a CD as a sun-reflecting warning device, I not only can venture out on weekends again, I'm also training those "hob-nailed" boaters to respect those of us who boat "in sandals".

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"...I'm not really convinced of this either, but..."
How about inviting 4˝-ton boats to your choice of "retirement lake"?

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"...In my experience, the lake at it's worst crowd-wise, is still a very mellow place to boat compared to other places I've boated..."
Yup. To counter that perception, we should bring their mayhem and anarchy to this lake...

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"...If boating on Winnipesuakee prior to the speed limit HONESTLY did scare some people, perhaps those same people lack the skills to boat safely. Can't help but wonder if these formerly frightened people are some of the same Captain Boneheads I keep hearing about. Kinda fits, no?
No.

Among this lake's worst—and most publicized—collisions was a result of a highly skilled, highly educated, and well-known "driver", who was concurrently employed in the GFBL field.

That hit-and-run occurred just prior to the 9/11 attack, which erased it from the Lakes Region's headlines and forums.

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"...That said, I'm sure there are plenty of skilled people out there who simply don't care about boating safely. I bet they'd be a large percentage of Captain Boneheads as well.
The Captain Boneheads out there are probably operating "over their heads": Some "drive" GFBLs.

And, as you undoubtedly know from motorcycle instruction, the faster one travels, the narrower the perception is taken of the course of travel***.

(Speed being the sole point of this sub-forum).

(***Or waypoint).

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Old 08-12-2009, 11:38 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Dave R View Post
I keep hearing about how crazy the lake is this year (I have not really noticed a difference, but I boat almost exclusively on weekdays). I also keep hearing how the lake feels so much safer this year that many people that used to be too frightened to use the lake are finally getting out to enjoy it (I'm not really convinced of this either, but...) In my experience, the lake at it's worst crowd-wise, is still a very mellow place to boat compared to ther places I've boated. If boating on Winnipesuakee prior to the speed limit HONESTLY did scare some people, perhaps those same people lack the skills to boat safely. Can't help but wonder if these formerly frightened people are some of the same Captain Boneheads I keep hearing about. Kinda fits, no?

That said, I'm sure there are plenty of skilled people out there who simply don't care about boating safely. I bet they'd be a large percentage of Captain Boneheads as well.
RE: the bolded text, that thought came to my mind a couple days ago but I wasn't sure I wanted to actually put the words out there for fear of offending someone. Your motorcycle scenario was a great example; when it comes to riding a motorcycle, the mechanics of operating the bike have to become second nature to the operator so they can focus on traffic and their location in regards to the traffic. If the operator has to actually think about what they're going to do next in regards to mechanical operation of the bike, then they're going to be distracted from the road. Great post, Dave R!!



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Now as for docking..... come on I thought everyone loved to dock????????
Not everyone!!!!!! For me, it depends on the situation. I have a hard time backing out of an inside spot when I have to back between 2 boats tied at the ends of finger docks like you would find at Wolfeboro or Weirs public docks. I usually end up drifting to one side or the other and while I can control the stern by turning the drive, the bow tends to wander on me and I worry about bumping a boat tied to the docks; the last thing I want to do is bump in to someone else's boat and possibly cause damage to their's or my own boat. So far, my solution has been to avoid tying up in an inside spot and it works well for the most part. Some day, I'll have to get some advice from someone who's more proficient at backing in tight quarters. Any volunteers?
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Old 08-12-2009, 11:50 AM   #6
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Some day, I'll have to get some advice from someone who's more proficient at backing in tight quarters. Any volunteers?
Take it in and out of gear while backing to keep the speed down. Some deep-V boats with single stern drives tend to back in a straight line, but with the boat skewed (crabbing) if allowed to build enough speed. Mine does this wickedly. I suspect that's what's happening to yours. With light (engine at idle) bursts of thrust, the boat will simply follow the propeller(s). The other option is to use a spring line and power to spin the boat around 180 degrees after going on the "inside".

Strive to have a helper with a boat hook and a big fender at hand in close quarters, regardless...
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Old 08-12-2009, 12:26 PM   #7
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Default Ship Handling

Back in my Navy days stationed aboard ship, which happened to be a Destroyer Tender just under 500 feet long, we had drills underway called "Bumper Drills". This was ship handling training for junior officers standing OOD watch on the bridge.

Marker buoys with weights and a "drag" attached would be tossed over the side and then the ODD had to maneuver the ship around and come back to the buoy and stop along side within a few feet of the marker. Officers of course didn't actually handle the wheel or engine room telegraph, but instead gave orders to the Helmsman and Lee Helmsman... such as "Helm: ..left Five degrees rudder..ahead 1/3..etc etc.

As a watchstander helmsman, I had the duty of following the orders the young officer gave to the letter..even knowing as I did so, that the order was going to have adverse results as I spun the wheel over. As experienced helmsman, we were not allowed to comment if we saw a disaster in the making... sometimes it was difficult suppressing a smile. The young OOD would be running from one side of the open wings of the bridge to the other, trying to figure out what order to give next.

Some of them picked it up soon enough but others never would get it and after a few sessions were not invited back to the bridge again.

I practice this same "ship handling" in my little 20 footer by going over to the Wolfeboro docks on a weekday and doing docking drills. Just drive the boat all the way in and practice "backing & filling"... turning the boat around in it's own length then driving out and then repeating the drill a few times before moving on.
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Old 08-12-2009, 12:31 PM   #8
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Default Backing Out

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Originally Posted by Wolfeboro_Baja View Post
Not everyone!!!!!! For me, it depends on the situation. I have a hard time backing out of an inside spot when I have to back between 2 boats tied at the ends of finger docks like you would find at Wolfeboro or Weirs public docks. I usually end up drifting to one side or the other and while I can control the stern by turning the drive, the bow tends to wander on me and I worry about bumping a boat tied to the docks; the last thing I want to do is bump in to someone else's boat and possibly cause damage to their's or my own boat. So far, my solution has been to avoid tying up in an inside spot and it works well for the most part. Some day, I'll have to get some advice from someone who's more proficient at backing in tight quarters. Any volunteers?
Wolfeboro Baja - I think what you are describing is oversteer - easy to do in a boat in both directions. The key (for me at least) to backing out straight is make sure the stern drive is pointing straight to start with (I can't see mine due to swim platform - so I just count the sterring wheel revolutions lock to lock and divide by 2 - to center the wheel/drive).

Then I make sure the engine is warmed up - don't want to be backing up when the engine is on fast idle (to much speed -per previous poster). I use this time to get everything in the boat ready (bunper away, etc) including un-tieing the boat and putting the dock lines away - I have my first mate hold (by hand) the boat at the dock at this point.

When ready to leave the dock I have all passengers take thier seats (passenger movement makes things difficult at low speed) while I hold the boat to the dock. When ready I push the boat gently away from the dock from the middle of the boat - object being to end up with the boat in the middle of the "lane" and straight. Then put into reverse (with the stern drive straight per preivious step) and back straight out.

I find that minimal sterring corection is required. Also if you need to make adjustment make small ones - and return the stern drive to straight once you see the stern of the boat respond to each adjustment (helps to keep the bow from swinging around).

Hope this helps...

PS. remember any docking you can walk away from is a good one
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Old 08-12-2009, 03:03 PM   #9
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Strive to have a helper with a boat hook and a big fender at hand in close quarters, regardless...
A boat hook is an excellent idea... after finding myself last year doing a lot of solo boating I invested in one of these gems.... it is an added comfort blanket when in tigt quarters..... I bought it after a close call... that cause me great anxiety.... no I pull it out, get it extended so I can reach past the other side of the boat.... when I am solo and slowly proceed.... as many have said the urge to over steer cause a lot off issues, but having devices such as boat hooks and bumpers, help a lot, to calm the nerves......
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Old 08-12-2009, 05:42 PM   #10
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Take it in and out of gear while backing to keep the speed down. Some deep-V boats with single stern drives tend to back in a straight line, but with the boat skewed (crabbing) if allowed to build enough speed. Mine does this wickedly. I suspect that's what's happening to yours. With light (engine at idle) bursts of thrust, the boat will simply follow the propeller(s). The other option is to use a spring line and power to spin the boat around 180 degrees after going on the "inside".

Strive to have a helper with a boat hook and a big fender at hand in close quarters, regardless...
You've pretty much described my problem I think. I keep thinking that no thrust equates to no control so I hesitate to throw it into neutral in order to slow down. I will try to work on that and pop it in and out of gear more frequently.


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Originally Posted by NoBozo View Post
I practice this same "ship handling" in my little 20 footer by going over to the Wolfeboro docks on a weekday and doing docking drills. Just drive the boat all the way in and practice "backing & filling"... turning the boat around in it's own length then driving out and then repeating the drill a few times before moving on.
You are correct, I do need to practice more. Probably something I can work on after Labor Day when the traffic lightens up.


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Wolfeboro Baja - I think what you are describing is oversteer - easy to do in a boat in both directions. The key (for me at least) to backing out straight is make sure the stern drive is pointing straight to start with (I can't see mine due to swim platform - so I just count the sterring wheel revolutions lock to lock and divide by 2 - to center the wheel/drive).

(text skipped)

I find that minimal sterring corection is required. Also if you need to make adjustment make small ones - and return the stern drive to straight once you see the stern of the boat respond to each adjustment (helps to keep the bow from swinging around).

Hope this helps...

PS. remember any docking you can walk away from is a good one
You're right, it does help to have the drive straight before moving away from the dock. I usually check the drive position while I'm still on the dock (like you, I can't see the drive from the driver's seat) before I even fire the engine and if it needs to be adjusted, I then go back to double-check the position. Regarding your P.S., it's not getting to the dock, it's leaving and having to back out between two boats that makes me nervous!


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A boat hook is an excellent idea... after finding myself last year doing a lot of solo boating I invested in one of these gems.... it is an added comfort blanket when in tigt quarters..... I bought it after a close call... that cause me great anxiety.... no I pull it out, get it extended so I can reach past the other side of the boat.... when I am solo and slowly proceed.... as many have said the urge to over steer cause a lot off issues, but having devices such as boat hooks and bumpers, help a lot, to calm the nerves......
I DO need to invest in a boat hook and learn the best ways and times to use it.

I apologize to the Dave R for dragging this off topic; it was not my intention. Thank you all for the great suggestions and advice. We now return you to your regularly sheduled programming!!
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Old 08-12-2009, 05:49 PM   #11
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Another great use for a boat hook is to elegantly stop another boat from crashing into you when you are parked at the public dock and the nubie is coming in at 6mph and using 90% of their brain to steer their own boat. A firm push with the rubber end is a lot safer than crushing your hands between the vessels.
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Old 08-12-2009, 08:06 PM   #12
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Default Just a Thought:

Comments about Boat Hooks, "Bumpers", etc etc........The more things YOU have to keep track of as SKIPPER ...Boat Hooks, The Throttle, The Shift Lever (what gear are we in..?), ..OMG..What is the angle of the outdrive..WHAT are your guests doing...their natural inclination is to Stand Up and HELP.....Not Good.. OR necessary if the Skipper knows what he is doing.

As Skipper: I ask the guests to remain seated (sip your drink) and everything will be fine...I will give instructions AFTER we are "reasonably sure" that docking will be sucessful.

When I see a boat with a Boat Hook brandished...I stand back. This is a sign of inexperiance. Experiance comes with Practice..Practice...which will result in CONFIDENCE.

YUP: It's kinda HARSH....I look at it as Tough Love.
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Old 08-12-2009, 08:39 PM   #13
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Comments about Boat Hooks, "Bumpers", etc etc........The more things YOU have to keep track of as SKIPPER ...Boat Hooks, The Throttle, The Shift Lever (what gear are we in..?), ..OMG..What is the angle of the outdrive..WHAT are your guests doing...their natural inclination is to Stand Up and HELP.....Not Good.. OR necessary if the Skipper knows what he is doing.

As Skipper: I ask the guests to remain seated (sip your drink) and everything will be fine...I will give instructions AFTER we are "reasonably sure" that docking will be sucessful.

When I see a boat with a Boat Hook brandished...I stand back. This is a sign of inexperiance. Experiance comes with Practice..Practice...which will result in CONFIDENCE.

YUP: It's kinda HARSH....I look at it as Tough Love.
Well said.. I am no perfectionist so I don't try doing something out of my ability when other boats are involved...

A good thing to try is in May, a week day, or early in the morning go to some public docks and try a few different ways to dock.. Use cones if you need to.. I luckily have a U shaped dock at my house so I can practice backing in. But there is really no disgrace in practicing....

PS. if you have pipes like mine, early in the morning isn't the best idea
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Old 08-19-2009, 10:34 AM   #14
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Some people are naturally good at working with machines; you know the type, they can easily figure out how to operate a backhoe, a snowmobile, a table saw, an arc welder, a wakeboard, a motorcycle, an ATV, a car with a stick-shift, etc. There's something in them that makes these tasks intuitive, easy and fun for them.
Good post Dave.

I am one of these people. It's hard for me to understand why everyone can't think like me (SIC) 10 min in to operating my new boat this year I felt 100% comfortable and completely understood it's operation. I like docking in the wind, launching at a tricky ramp and I love the fact that all the inside spots in Wolfeboro are usually open while people wait for the end spots.

My father is the opposite and I grew up with LOTS of drama while boating on the ocean. We hit rocks, other boats, sandbars, etc. We were the cap'n boneheads. This all stopped when I became the designated captain at about 16yo.

Maybe this is why I have never been scared on the lake. Cap'n BHs just don’t appear in an instant they can bee seen coming at you or from behind you for quite a while. I can usually profile them pretty well and figure "This guy" is going to do something stupid. I have seen many stupid moves over the years but none of them really "surprised" me. I can spot an anchor marine rental boat a half mile away. I figure I have a good minute before he "cuts right in front of me"

Please don’t take this post as arrogant as it sounds. It's just the way my brain works. I COMPLETELY understand other people don’t think this way!!!

One thing I try to do is communicate well with the other boaters on the lake. If I am heading toward another boat, regardless who is the give way boat, I alter my direction one time enough to show my intended course. If they are paying attention they know where I am going. 75% of the time this generates a reaction from the other boat and we pass knowing exactly what each other is doing. If I don’t get a response I figure they don’t see me, or don’t care, and do what I have to do to pass safely.

I think an advanced boating course would benefit a lot of boaters. Not the kind that goes over the rules of the road, and all that stuff that tries to force you in to being a safe boater. We need a course that helps people understand boating so the safe behavior comes naturally. It really just comes down to communicating with the other boats on the lake.

The course could cover…

What happens when you cross a wake at an angle?
How to dock in the wind?
Why does my boat back up better to the left?
How to read another boaters mind!!!!
How are my actions going to be perceived by the "other guy"?
Am I adding confusion to the situation?
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Old 08-19-2009, 10:46 AM   #15
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Default Not harsh.

I think it makes sense. Common sense.

Damn, I keep losing my 'Thanks' button since I switch to IE8. Hopefully it will be fixed.
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Old 08-19-2009, 11:08 AM   #16
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One thing I try to do is communicate well with the other boaters on the lake. If I am heading toward another boat, regardless who is the give way boat, I alter my direction one time enough to show my intended course. If they are paying attention they know where I am going. 75% of the time this generates a reaction from the other boat and we pass knowing exactly what each other is doing. If I don’t get a response I figure they don’t see me, or don’t care, and do what I have to do to pass safely.
This such a simple thing to do, and a great habit to have. I do the same. A give-way captain made a very obvious course correction to starboard, about 1/4 mile from me just yesterday and I appreciated it and waved as he passed behind me. I also noticed a few give-way captains that simply sped up, well in advance of potential crossing situations, simply to avoid having to give-way (can't have an accident if you are not there...). I appreciate that as well. I often do the same if I cannot turn to starboard safely.
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Old 08-19-2009, 02:10 PM   #17
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This such a simple thing to do, and a great habit to have. I do the same. A give-way captain made a very obvious course correction to starboard, about 1/4 mile from me just yesterday and I appreciated it and waved as he passed behind me. I also noticed a few give-way captains that simply sped up, well in advance of potential crossing situations, simply to avoid having to give-way (can't have an accident if you are not there...). I appreciate that as well. I often do the same if I cannot turn to starboard safely.
The question is, Can this type of behavior be learned or do people just function in different ways? I think there are people like you and I that go out and enjoy driving , and all the surounding activity that it comes with, and others that are out to enjoy the ride and don't want to be bothered by there surroundings.
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Old 08-19-2009, 02:38 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by 4Fun View Post
The question is, Can this type of behavior be learned or do people just function in different ways? I think there are people like you and I that go out and enjoy driving , and all the surounding activity that it comes with, and others that are out to enjoy the ride and don't want to be bothered by there surroundings.
Hard to say. Can people be "taught" to be nice? I'm reasonably sure common sense is not necessarily a learned behavior. Nowadays, people seem all stressed out over something, and bothered by some group of people or another. I do the same as you guys, turn to starboard and go my own way, well ahead of any situations that may develop. I may very well be one of a select few idiots that slows in the bay before swamping small sailboats. Many boaters today operate on water as many people do on land. With a boatful of arrogance and hardly a thought given to anyone else. I'm never sure whether it's outright arrogance or simply a cultural issue. Many probably act the way their families acted, don't know.

But from politics to religion to boating to highways, it certainly does seem a lot different than the old days. I certainly can't imagine living the rest of my life fueled with arrogance and hatred or bigotry, there has to be some fun and life in there somewhere
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Old 08-19-2009, 03:43 PM   #19
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But from politics to religion to boating to highways, it certainly does seem a lot different than the old days. I certainly can't imagine living the rest of my life fueled with arrogance and hatred or bigotry, there has to be some fun and life in there somewhere
What's ironic is some of the people filled with all this desire for new laws and to desire to regulate are are the ones that area actually causing some of the problems.

I guarantee if you are going 10mph down the Moultonboro Neck narrows you will be passed by numerous boats. Many closer than 100'. There's just not enough room.

One side will say "Hey, I should be allowed to enjoy the lake at my speed without fear of being run over"

The other side will say "Hey, mr inconsiderate, get the hell out of the way you are blocking the entire channel"


No different than road rage. Some bad drivers actually cause some good drivers in to road rage.
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Old 08-19-2009, 05:28 PM   #20
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I guarantee if you are going 10mph down the Moultonboro Neck narrows you will be passed by numerous boats. Many closer than 100'. There's just not enough room.
We live in the narrows and see this problem all the time. If the slow boats would only go to the right side of the channel, there would be plenty of room to pass unless boats are coming from both directions. Not all boats are fast, but it is all too common to see boats that can plane go 6 mph right up the middle so nobody can pass them (unless you know the alternate route between the rocks ) Indeed, one must pass the pokers with less than 150' clearance and hope MP isn't watching, or idle for 5 minutes. Its just a matter of being considerate of others.
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Old 08-19-2009, 05:34 PM   #21
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We live in the narrows and see this problem all the time. If the slow boats would only go to the right side of the channel, there would be plenty of room to pass unless boats are coming from both directions. Not all boats are fast, but it is all too common to see boats that can plane go 6 mph right up the middle so nobody can pass them (unless you know the alternate route between the rocks ) Indeed, one must pass the pokers with less than 150' clearance and hope MP isn't watching, or idle for 5 minutes. Its just a matter of being considerate of others.
Lake Geezer.. Great post.. I live right through the narrows as well before you hit Suissvale..

I can not believe how inconsiderate people are!! Not only do you get the people going idle all the way right down the middle, but then you have kayakers doing the exact same thing.... It causes a nightmare of a traffic jam. It only is a matter of time that either someone who is clueless or fed up planes off and passes well within 100 Ft. I disagree with that manuever as well but could people Please look behind them and see they are blocking everyone else.

PS... I wonder if you saw me earlier this year before I blew my engine... I have to go through there everytime to get out to the big lake. Give me a wave next year!
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Old 08-19-2009, 09:05 PM   #22
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Default Great Post DaveR

I'm always aware of the limits of my boat and my skills. A 20' Pontoon in the Broads, on a windy, busy weekend day... bad idea. Trying to dock the boat on an inside slot in Meridith... not pretty.

A big part of enjoying the lake for us, is carefully picking the times and conditions we choose to go out on the lake. Mostly weeknights just out to watch the sunset.

However, the biggest concern I have is not the GFBL, but the 24' bowriders screaming down the lake towing tubers, with no regard for anyone in their path and the 32'ers not on plane plowing up 3 foot wakes 100' in front of me. ( I can't count the times we have been sitting in the middle of the broads on a nice still evening, hoping for a good camera shot when some BH doesn't have the common sense or courtesy to alter course enough to not swamp us with his wake.)

PS... My wife would really like to go for a ride on a GFBL... any volunteers? Me...I like the pontoon!

It's a big lake, plenty of room for everyone.

Seems like common sense isn't all that common sometimes
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Old 08-19-2009, 09:17 PM   #23
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It's been the primary point of most posts since last year and beyond SteveA. You have it right. There are many that know this, but won't participate or help out because it would take away from their primary mission. It's not politically expedient to voice concern over tubers or wakes. That comes later. All we want is a little safety and enjoyment. They want life one agenda at a time.
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Old 08-20-2009, 07:17 AM   #24
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I'm always aware of the limits of my boat and my skills. A 20' Pontoon in the Broads, on a windy, busy weekend day... bad idea. Trying to dock the boat on an inside slot in Meridith... not pretty.

A big part of enjoying the lake for us, is carefully picking the times and conditions we choose to go out on the lake. Mostly weeknights just out to watch the sunset.

However, the biggest concern I have is not the GFBL, but the 24' bowriders screaming down the lake towing tubers, with no regard for anyone in their path and the 32'ers not on plane plowing up 3 foot wakes 100' in front of me. ( I can't count the times we have been sitting in the middle of the broads on a nice still evening, hoping for a good camera shot when some BH doesn't have the common sense or courtesy to alter course enough to not swamp us with his wake.)

PS... My wife would really like to go for a ride on a GFBL... any volunteers? Me...I like the pontoon!

It's a big lake, plenty of room for everyone.

Seems like common sense isn't all that common sometimes
No worries.. My boat will be back on the lake early spring.. She is welcome to go for a ride...
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Old 08-20-2009, 08:24 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by 4Fun View Post
The question is, Can this type of behavior be learned or do people just function in different ways? I think there are people like you and I that go out and enjoy driving , and all the surounding activity that it comes with, and others that are out to enjoy the ride and don't want to be bothered by there surroundings.
I think good habits can easily be learned, but not exactly enjoyed like you and I seem to. I LIKE it when I have to deal with another boats (it gives me something to do and makes things interesting), especially when I discover the other captain knows what she/he is doing. I really don't mind coming off-plane for good reasons or even dramatically altering my course/speed (on-plane) for boneheads. I'm only mildy irritated when forced to come off-plane solely due to rudeness of other boaters, or when I see boaters putting others at risk. I get angry about blatent disregard for safety of my charges That said, because I also boat in places where 150' safe passage laws are not an issue, I don't consider the typical Winnipesuakee safe passage violation a blatent disregard for safety, it has to be really bad to make me angry.
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