Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > Home, Cottage or Land Maintenance
Home Forums Gallery YouTube Channel Classifieds Links Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-26-2018, 10:19 AM   #1
bigdog
Senior Member
 
bigdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Central MA-Gilford
Posts: 946
Thanks: 122
Thanked 62 Times in 52 Posts
Default Cold basement ?

I just moved into a new house (new to me), and have noticed the the basement is very cold, like 63-64 degrees.

House was built in 2012, and is very well insulated, extremely good quality double pane windows. The basement is completely 'finished', and includes a huge living area, bedroom and bathroom.

I've noticed that the basement seems to be very damp, almost 'clamy' !
There's a whole house humidifier tied into the gas furnace, and assume it's working OK....

Any thoughts on what's going on here ?
bigdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 10:36 AM   #2
fatlazyless
Senior Member
 
fatlazyless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 6,232
Thanks: 192
Thanked 476 Times in 352 Posts
Default

For twenty dollars, last fall, the Plymouth Walmart was selling heated, electric blanket throws, about 4x6', in red or blue plaid that plug into a wall outlet, and have three settings, low-med-high, that turns itself off after an hour, if you fall asleep or something. Could be the best 20-bucks ever spent for surviving the long NH winter.

Or, just go to your local thrift store and get a good wool sweater for four dollars.
__________________
Down & out, livn that Walmart side of the lake!
fatlazyless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 10:40 AM   #3
Biggd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Waltham Ma./Meredith NH
Posts: 1,661
Thanks: 420
Thanked 277 Times in 197 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdog View Post
I just moved into a new house (new to me), and have noticed the the basement is very cold, like 63-64 degrees.

House was built in 2012, and is very well insulated, extremely good quality double pane windows. The basement is completely 'finished', and includes a huge living area, bedroom and bathroom.

I've noticed that the basement seems to be very damp, almost 'clamy' !
There's a whole house humidifier tied into the gas furnace, and assume it's working OK....

Any thoughts on what's going on here ?
It doesn't sound like the basement cement walls were well insulated. The ground is keeping it cool and damp. Most people like a cool basement in the summer but it will be cold in the winter. Since the basement is already finished I'm not sure what can be done inexpensively. Spray foam insulation works great on basement walls but that would require a lot of work now.
I had an unfinished basement sprayed with 3" of foam and it made quite a difference. It's been one of the best improvements that I've done since buying it and I've done quite few. I'm going to get the garage done next year.
Biggd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 10:47 AM   #4
chipj29
Senior Member
 
chipj29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Bow
Posts: 1,853
Thanks: 487
Thanked 285 Times in 151 Posts
Default

If you run a dehumidifier, I think that you will find that it will not only remove the dampness, but it will make it feel quite a bit warmer. I run mine year round, although in the winter, the air is generally pretty dry so it doesn't run all that frequently.
__________________
Getting ready for winter!
chipj29 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chipj29 For This Useful Post:
Reilly (07-30-2018)
Old 07-26-2018, 10:49 AM   #5
lakershaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Rattlesnake Isl. - Simsbury, CT
Posts: 233
Thanks: 57
Thanked 37 Times in 19 Posts
Default get a dehumidifier

The whole house humidifier is for the winter when the heater raises the temperature and drops the relative humidity - doesn't do anything to help with damp basement air, and if anything could make it worse if it is actually on in the summer. Get a de-humidifier and run that. We have one in our basement running all the time, and makes it much better. As for the temperature, does your heater/AC also have a zone for the basement? If not, you may need to address that separately so it is warm enough in the winter.
lakershaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 07-26-2018, 11:19 AM   #6
bigdog
Senior Member
 
bigdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Central MA-Gilford
Posts: 946
Thanks: 122
Thanked 62 Times in 52 Posts
Default

Thanks everyone for your comments......

I'll install a portable humidifier in the basement, and hope to see if this helps, I will report back to all.

I LOVE THIS FORUM !!!!!!!

Last edited by bigdog; 07-26-2018 at 11:21 AM. Reason: spelling
bigdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 11:25 AM   #7
Biggd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Waltham Ma./Meredith NH
Posts: 1,661
Thanks: 420
Thanked 277 Times in 197 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdog View Post
Thanks everyone for your comments......

I'll install a portable humidifier in the basement, and hope to see if this helps, I will report back to all.

I LOVE THIS FORUM !!!!!!!
De-humidifier!

Last edited by Biggd; 07-26-2018 at 12:07 PM.
Biggd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 11:47 AM   #8
winni83
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Moultonborough, NH
Posts: 198
Thanks: 15
Thanked 83 Times in 49 Posts
Default

There are dehumidifers available with built in pumps, so if a gravity drain is not an option, you can pump up to an available drain or outside. We have one and it does the job without having to emply the tank.
winni83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 12:09 PM   #9
TiltonBB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gilford, NH and Florida
Posts: 1,402
Thanks: 213
Thanked 761 Times in 313 Posts
Default

I put a dehumidifier in a basement that was always damp. It made a huge difference.

Instead of using a pump system or constantly emptying the tank I mounted it on a shelf above the outside grade and ran a hose through the wall so it can constantly drain and requires no attention.
TiltonBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 12:13 PM   #10
DesertDweller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Las Vegas, NV and Moultonborough, NH
Posts: 270
Thanks: 16
Thanked 60 Times in 50 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chipj29 View Post
If you run a dehumidifier, I think that you will find that it will not only remove the dampness, but it will make it feel quite a bit warmer. I run mine year round, although in the winter, the air is generally pretty dry so it doesn't run all that frequently.
+1. Exactly what I do as well. The difference is immediately noticeable. I have mine draining into our sump pump hole.
DesertDweller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 01:48 PM   #11
SIKSUKR
Senior Member
 
SIKSUKR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,059
Thanks: 215
Thanked 893 Times in 505 Posts
Default

Definately look at either a pump or location to gravity the water away because you will soon be tired of emptying that tank everyday and if you dont empty it a switch will shut it off.
__________________
SIKSUKR
SIKSUKR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 01:57 PM   #12
Merrymeeting
Senior Member
 
Merrymeeting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Merrymeeting Lake, New Durham
Posts: 1,991
Thanks: 238
Thanked 684 Times in 299 Posts
Default

We have a house that was also build in 2012. But we went with an ICF foundation (insulated concrete forms...simply stated, insulated forms that stay in place after the pour). Our basement stays a consistent 62-65 degrees all year.

In the winter, this actually helps with the heating as we gain some level of ground heat. We also have a wood stove there which makes it nice and toasty when in use.

In the summer, it's natural air conditioning. We run a DE-humidifier, and with the consistent 62-65 degrees, feels like nicely air-conditioned rooms. When it isn't so humid, we can open up the windows and doors (it's a walk-out basement) and it rises to the ambient outdoor temp.
Merrymeeting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 02:58 PM   #13
Kamper
Senior Member
 
Kamper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Thornton's Ferry
Posts: 1,193
Thanks: 65
Thanked 141 Times in 105 Posts
Default

I use a dehumidifier year 'round. I hardly ever hear it come on in the winter though. It definitely cuts down the musty smell that was there when I moved in.

So far as being cold... Enjoy it in the summer. If you don't have central AC, you might be able to get your furnace system adjusted to cycle that cold air into the upper levels with just a fan setting. If you do, I definitely advise a dehumidifier and premium air filters.

In the winter you will do better with a heat source at floor level. If your vents are all in the ceiling you will need to ducting to get them to floor level or add baseboard heaters or even small space heaters. I sometimes use those heater cubes to warm a trailer I use for a guest house. I estimate it costs $1 a day so these things are quite effective. Those oil filled radiators are the least effective heater I ever had because they have have no circulation and they take forever to warm up even the smallest area.

I also got a boost by opening the filter access panel in my furnace to draw in some of the cellar air the same way the cold air returns bring floor level air from the main level to be reheated. I also added a small filter over the opening but it was probably not necessary.

Good luck!
Kamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2018, 03:57 PM   #14
DickR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Moultonborough
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 153 Times in 95 Posts
Default

Another vote for using a dehumifier in the basement in summer. And of course it's cooler down there because the ground below the surface is gradually cooler, approaching deep ground temperature with depth, somewhere near 50 F. The dehumidifier is needed for your health and the building's, because that basement temperature, in the low to mid 60s, is below the dew point of summer air much of the time. Cool that air to near its dew point and you've got near 100% relative humidity, and that's the reason it feels clammy. Condensation on/absorption by the walls and floor leads to that musty basement smell common to many homes, and to mold.

It's possible that the basement walls, if insulated at all behind the "finishing," weren't insulated properly, but have fiberglass batts up against the concrete. Here is a good read on how a basement should be insulated:

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-basement-wall

Be careful about how you use that whole house humidification system (or did you mean DE-humification?). Adding moisture to interior air in winter can cause problems. In most cases, a house with excessively dry air in winter is a house that leaks far too much air. Such a house could stand a good blower-door-directed air sealing effort. Here are a couple of good reads on that issue:

https://www.energyvanguard.com/blog/...or-air-quality

https://www.energyvanguard.com/blog/...s-Infiltration
DickR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2018, 08:16 AM   #15
SIKSUKR
Senior Member
 
SIKSUKR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,059
Thanks: 215
Thanked 893 Times in 505 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DickR View Post
Be careful about how you use that whole house humidification system (or did you mean DE-humification?). Adding moisture to interior air in winter can cause problems. /url]
Most forced hot air systems will have a humidifier attached to the supply plenum.
__________________
SIKSUKR
SIKSUKR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2018, 08:13 AM   #16
SAMIAM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Moultonborough
Posts: 2,390
Thanks: 138
Thanked 952 Times in 355 Posts
Default

Same here....walk out basement with dehumidifier that dumps into sump pump well.
Washer,dryer,workspace and downstairs bedroom are always cool.dry and comfortable even in the most humid weather.
SAMIAM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2018, 09:04 AM   #17
nhcatrider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 160
Thanks: 19
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltonBB View Post
I put a dehumidifier in a basement that was always damp. It made a huge difference.

Instead of using a pump system or constantly emptying the tank I mounted it on a shelf above the outside grade and ran a hose through the wall so it can constantly drain and requires no attention.

I did the same thing. I never have to water my rose bushes in the summer. The only drawback for me is I have to run multiple units, the footprint of my house is 40x30 with multiple rooms in the basement.
nhcatrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.30543 seconds