Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > Home, Cottage or Land Maintenance
Home Forums Gallery Blogs YouTube Channel Classifieds Links Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-27-2014, 03:44 PM   #1
Glendale Deli Boy
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Closing House for Winter

Bought a year round home at the Lake but new job assignment will make it impossible to visit in the winter.

My preference is to close up the home instead of heating it all winter given the high oil costs. What are some of the considerations and risks I need to evaluate if I go this route?

I will hire a plumber to drain the pipes but are there other steps I need to take to protect the house from sustaining damage from the freezing temperatures?

Thanks!
Glendale Deli Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2014, 04:21 PM   #2
phoenix
Senior Member
 
phoenix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: phoenix and moultonboro
Posts: 1,114
Thanks: 14
Thanked 143 Times in 103 Posts
Default

I have done this for 15 yeas and as long as the plumber uses a large enough compressor then it should work. By the way i used one for awhile that didnt and we got a burst pipe. Also i have forced hot water so need to have anti freeze in the system. Other than that and having your drive way plowed for safety and insurance purposes you should be ok
__________________
it's tough to make predictions specially about the future
phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2014, 06:22 PM   #3
Sunrise Point
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Meredith Center / Winnisquam
Posts: 250
Thanks: 87
Thanked 34 Times in 21 Posts
Default Double check your appliances

In years past we have drained our camp and left it unheated in the winter. 2 years ago we did some remodeling and added a dishwasher and a refrigerator with an ice and water dispenser.

Our long-time plumber told us that he couldn't guarantee that the new appliances would survive the winter. It seems that it is nearly impossible to remove 100% of the water from these appliances.

I mentioned this to an appliance repair technician from Baron's and he basically agreed. He recommended that we leave the heat on at a minimum of 50 degrees to protect the computer chips as well as prevent any issues from freezing water. Well...that wasn't going to happen!

Our plumber winterized all of the pipes with non-toxic antifreeze and ran it through the appliances as well. It ended up costing us more $$$, but when we returned this spring, everything was fine when we turned the water on.

If anyone else has experienced these extra precautions with new appliances, I would love to hear of it.

Good luck.
Sunrise Point is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2014, 07:20 PM   #4
Chaselady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Melvin Village
Posts: 309
Thanks: 150
Thanked 104 Times in 72 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunrise Point View Post
In years past we have drained our camp and left it unheated in the winter. 2 years ago we did some remodeling and added a dishwasher and a refrigerator with an ice and water dispenser.

Our long-time plumber told us that he couldn't guarantee that the new appliances would survive the winter. It seems that it is nearly impossible to remove 100% of the water from these appliances.

I mentioned this to an appliance repair technician from Baron's and he basically agreed. He recommended that we leave the heat on at a minimum of 50 degrees to protect the computer chips as well as prevent any issues from freezing water. Well...that wasn't going to happen!

Our plumber winterized all of the pipes with non-toxic antifreeze and ran it through the appliances as well. It ended up costing us more $$$, but when we returned this spring, everything was fine when we turned the water on.

If anyone else has experienced these extra precautions with new appliances, I would love to hear of it.

Good luck.
We were told by a repair tech ( from Barron's) that we should only put in the most basic appliances in our island cottage. We shut down totally in the winter. He said many new appliances have electronics that are unable to tolerate sub freezing temps. We have a W/D that is 25 yrs old. He told us to hang onto it!
Chaselady is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Chaselady For This Useful Post:
Sunrise Point (09-27-2014)
Old 09-27-2014, 08:44 PM   #5
upthesaukee
Senior Member
 
upthesaukee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Alton Bay
Posts: 4,699
Blog Entries: 2
Thanks: 1,410
Thanked 1,429 Times in 774 Posts
Default

If nothing else, LCD displays do not like freezing weather ( tv's, displzys on appliances, etc).

Sent from my GT-P5210 using Tapatalk
__________________
I Live Here... I am always UPTHESAUKEE !!!!
upthesaukee is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 09-27-2014, 09:55 PM   #6
RLW
Senior Member
 
RLW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Alton Bay on the mountain by a lake
Posts: 2,019
Thanks: 553
Thanked 411 Times in 309 Posts
Smile

Glendale Deli Boy, I was just browsing through the forum and noticed that you are fairly new to posting on the forum after joining back in July 2013. We are glad that you have come aboard and joined us. Have fun and enjoy the Winni Forum while making many new friends.

It's looking like you are getting some good responses to your request. Don't you wish that the summer months extended a little longer.

__________________
There is nothing better than living on Alton Mountain & our grand kids visits.
RLW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2014, 06:08 AM   #7
TheProfessor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 476
Thanks: 16
Thanked 122 Times in 75 Posts
Default

It certainly can be closed down as mentioned above.

But make sure you hire a good plumber who knows how to do all correctly.

I had a neighbor who decided to close down his home for winter. Next Spring he had a sheet rock crew in to fix the seams on the sheet rock in his living room. Not sure the issue or cause. But they spent more on repairs then the savings at keeping heat on all winter.
TheProfessor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2014, 06:56 AM   #8
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,085
Thanks: 312
Thanked 724 Times in 349 Posts
Default

If you have a "spray thingy" on your kitchen sink make sure to unhook it and completely drain it! Stereo equipment doesn't like the cold much either.
__________________

mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2014, 02:33 PM   #9
phoenix
Senior Member
 
phoenix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: phoenix and moultonboro
Posts: 1,114
Thanks: 14
Thanked 143 Times in 103 Posts
Default

yes I have been told that leaving a house with no heat is not the best for sheetrock but for me I figure it would cost several thousand to heat to 50 for whole winter. we have had a dishwasher for one year and had no problem with it after a winter. As far as lCD TV . We left one in a window over the winter and it was dead in spring but luckily still under warranty( this year I took it out of window and wrapped it up in a blanket) . WE have had no problem structurally with 15 year's of shutting down for the winter but get a good plumber with an adequate compressor
__________________
it's tough to make predictions specially about the future
phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2014, 06:22 PM   #10
DickR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Moultonborough
Posts: 510
Thanks: 0
Thanked 153 Times in 95 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenix View Post
....As far as lCD TV . We left one in a window over the winter and it was dead in spring but luckily still under warranty( this year I took it out of window and wrapped it up in a blanket).
I'm curious. what will the blanket do for the TV? Is it an electric blanket?
DickR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2014, 06:38 PM   #11
ishoot308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Gilford, NH / Welch Island
Posts: 4,137
Thanks: 1,448
Thanked 2,937 Times in 1,117 Posts
Default

LCD TVs are used in conversion vans and motor homes and are really not affected by cold weather. I have two 50" LCD TVs in my camp that have had no issues and survived 5 winters so far? I don't do anything special except unplug them.

Plasma TVs do not handle cold well!

Dan
__________________
It's Always Sunny On Welch Island!!
ishoot308 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 06:12 AM   #12
dpg
Senior Member
 
dpg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 2,417
Thanks: 136
Thanked 209 Times in 151 Posts
Default

Probably wouldn't make a huge difference but if you decide to heat the home 50 is a bit warm. My families had a home in Moultonborough for 25+ years and kept it at a max of 45 every winter since my parents bought it. I have no clue what the difference would be between keeping a place 45 or 50 (in dollars) but I would think every little bit helps.
dpg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 08:12 AM   #13
camp guy
Senior Member
 
camp guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: formerly Winter Harbor, still Wolfeboro
Posts: 779
Thanks: 145
Thanked 255 Times in 155 Posts
Default Closing house for winter

Ths is an age-old question, and a frequent topic on this Forum, particularly this time of year.

I live here year round, so I may not be the best source of information.

First of all, you can never save money by putting your house at risk. The damage caused by frozen pipes, cracked ceilings, damaged appliances, etc., is far more expensive than heating your house at between 45 - 50 degrees F all winter. Also, youj need some sort of signalling method to notify you, or somebody, if the heating system fails and the temperature falls below 45 degrees.

You might want to engage the services of a property watch company to check your house periodically just in case something happens to happen.

You might also want to check with your homeowner insurance company to see what they say about winter coverage. It would be terrible to shut your house down, have a problem, and then find out that there is a clause in your Policy that vacates coverage if the house is not heated.

The hard cold facts are that having a second home brings a second set of costs, and trying to cut down on these costs may not be the best plan.

Good luck to you, and solicit as many opinions as you can, but remember, it is your house, not theirs, and you will be responsible for the costs of damages, not them.
camp guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 08:48 AM   #14
Chaselady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Melvin Village
Posts: 309
Thanks: 150
Thanked 104 Times in 72 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ishoot308 View Post
LCD TVs are used in conversion vans and motor homes and are really not affected by cold weather. I have two 50" LCD TVs in my camp that have had no issues and survived 5 winters so far? I don't do anything special except unplug them.

Plasma TVs do not handle cold well!

Dan
We have been told the opposite, that LCD ( liquid crystal ) shoul not get cold as they will freeze....so we bought a plasma for the cottage. No problems at all.
Chaselady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 09:22 AM   #15
ishoot308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Gilford, NH / Welch Island
Posts: 4,137
Thanks: 1,448
Thanked 2,937 Times in 1,117 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaselady View Post
We have been told the opposite, that LCD ( liquid crystal ) shoul not get cold as they will freeze....so we bought a plasma for the cottage. No problems at all.
That is interesting Chaselady... When I was purchasing the two TVs 5 years ago for my camp I contacted Samsungs technical support and they were the ones who informed me that their LCD TV's would handle the cold better than their plasmas. They also stated that their LCD's were good for -4 degrees. They did however tell me before plugging them in to make sure they were up to room temperature for at least two hours which I always do.

I just checked their web site now and according to Samsung, both their plasma and LCD TV's are good to -4 degrees for storage!

So I guess either way if it's working stick with it!

Dan
__________________
It's Always Sunny On Welch Island!!
ishoot308 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ishoot308 For This Useful Post:
Chaselady (09-29-2014)
Old 09-29-2014, 10:53 AM   #16
loony
Senior Member
 
loony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 71
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default winterizing dishwasher

I have a Bosch dishwasher that I have winterized for many years with no problem.

In my case, the dishwasher water connection is under the floor in the basement. I added a spigot between the dishwasher water shutoff and the dishwasher connection. I shut off the dishwasher water connection, and open the spigot. I connect a hose from the spigot to a submersible water pump in a bucket of RV antifreeze. I turn on the pump and run the dishwasher for about 30sec to 1min - just long enough to fill the sump in the dishwasher. I then reset the dishwasher so it drains.

I also turn on the shut off valve while I winterize the rest of the plumbing to ensure the water line drains. I then close it again and keep It closed all winter.

I keep the sump pump hooked up to the spigot all winter. We generally don't run the dishwasher in winter but we do run it if we have a big crowd. Since the pump is already hooked up, it only takes a few minutes to re- winterize.

the 1st time I use the dishwasher I run a rinse-hold or short cycle to flush out the antifreeze.

one could do a similar thing if the connection were under the sink. If you could add a T connector and valve to the under sink connection and run a hose to the counter top, you could gravity feed the antifreeze- just like winterizing a boat.

Last edited by loony; 09-29-2014 at 12:20 PM.
loony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 12:09 PM   #17
Steveo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 505
Thanks: 46
Thanked 118 Times in 60 Posts
Default Couple of other gotchas

Dishwasher - there is usually a reserve of water (primarily for pump prime I think) that is inside the dishwasher under the debris screen. I usually remove the screen and push a sponge in there several times until dry. Remember in the spring to throw a pitcher of water back in so the pump doesn't suck air when it is first turned on. I also disconnect the water supply to and at the dishwasher to drain it properly. That hose never drains on its own.

Washing machine - as long as you ran a full cycle there should be no water in the machine but don't forget to drain all the hoses in the back.

Water sprayer in sink - remove the sprayer unit and drain with handle depressed

Hot water tank - obviously should be drained but don't forget to turn power off to it so the elements don't burn out.
Steveo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 12:56 PM   #18
Orion
Senior Member
 
Orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Cow Island
Posts: 891
Thanks: 530
Thanked 163 Times in 82 Posts
Default no problem

I do similar to Steveo. I've had a Maytag Neptune clothes washer and a Kenmore dishwasher at our place, both going strong after 13 years. Only once did the dishwasher inlet valve freeze when I failed to disconnect the hose at the dishwasher end and run it through a few seconds of fill cycle. I also add a quart or so of non-toxic antifreeze into the tub and run it on a drain cycle until no water enters the sink drain. For the clothes washer, I raise it on 4x4 blocks and lower the drain hose in the back to the floor to drain after disconnecting the feed hoses and running the machine on a fill and drain cycle for a few seconds.
Orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 05:56 PM   #19
winterh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 92
Thanks: 0
Thanked 24 Times in 14 Posts
Default

I have a shed that I store a lot of my outside stuff in.Last winter some squirrels or something chewed through the water trampoline that was folded up. Whats the best way to keep them away?
winterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2014, 06:01 PM   #20
DickR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Moultonborough
Posts: 510
Thanks: 0
Thanked 153 Times in 95 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by winterh View Post
I have a shed that I store a lot of my outside stuff in.Last winter some squirrels or something chewed through the water trampoline that was folded up. Whats the best way to keep them away?
Maybe add several sheets of fabric softener to the package. This has been suggested as a deterrent to rodents. I've been placing a number of sheets in the boat as part of storage, after one year when the critters ate holes in the two front seats. No further damage since.
DickR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 06:25 AM   #21
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,085
Thanks: 312
Thanked 724 Times in 349 Posts
Default Try Peppermint Oil

Try peppermint oil. Peppermint oil is a natural deterrent. The smell is simply too intense for rodents and they will not try to go near it. It also helps to mask the scent of any tasty morsels that have been missed when cleaning. You can get peppermint oil in most health food stores and even some major grocery stores.

http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Mice-Naturally
__________________

mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 07:28 AM   #22
Merrymeeting
Senior Member
 
Merrymeeting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Merrymeeting Lake, New Durham
Posts: 1,991
Thanks: 240
Thanked 684 Times in 299 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaselady View Post
We have been told the opposite, that LCD ( liquid crystal ) shoul not get cold as they will freeze....so we bought a plasma for the cottage. No problems at all.
If there was an issue here, there would be a raft of electronic device failures every day of the winter as people leave their phones, laptops, tablets, tv's, etc in a freezing car for the day.

You do need to be careful about powering them up before allowing for a slow, steady, warming.
Merrymeeting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 08:41 AM   #23
Blue Thunder
Senior Member
 
Blue Thunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Eastern MA & Frye Island/Sebago Lake, Maine
Posts: 818
Thanks: 202
Thanked 234 Times in 108 Posts
Default

Winterizing a water system is extremely easy with a small compressor like this available at Harbor Freight.
http://www.harborfreight.com/air-too...sor-60637.html
I hook mine up to the outside sillcock/garden hose connection. It blows all the lines in the house, no disconnecting anything. Just run the washer and dishwasher momentarily to get the water out of the supply lines then pink anti freeze all the drains, traps and toilets as others have described above. Piece of cake.
BT
__________________
" Live for today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come"
Blue Thunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 09:40 AM   #24
BroadHopper
Senior Member
 
BroadHopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Laconia NH / Bozeman MO
Posts: 4,752
Thanks: 2,280
Thanked 834 Times in 578 Posts
Default Built to drain in the first place.

When Dad remodeled/winterize the cottage back in the 80's his plumber Don Morin had all the pipes set up so that the water by gravity will drain back to the pump just by opening a faucet near the pump and opening all the spigots and faucets in the house. Simple as that! We don't have a dishwasher to contend with. We have great family time together manually washing and drying the dishes. We do have an old washer that for some reason never been a problem (1960's Maytag). Even the hot water heater drains at the same time.

AS for the artesian well pump, there was some kind of drainback that allows the water to drain back down the well so that it won't freeze. It is somewhat expensive to setup this way but, it gives peace of mind.
__________________
Someday may never be an actual day.
BroadHopper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014, 12:03 PM   #25
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,564
Thanks: 454
Thanked 799 Times in 552 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdude View Post
Try peppermint oil. Peppermint oil is a natural deterrent. The smell is simply too intense for rodents and they will not try to go near it. It also helps to mask the scent of any tasty morsels that have been missed when cleaning. You can get peppermint oil in most health food stores and even some major grocery stores.

http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Mice-Naturally
THat is interesting. I have a friend who sells essential oils and she always smells faintly of them. She tells me she never has ants or bugs and their house in Fl never have any bugs and they don't have any pest people. So it must work.
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2014, 10:01 AM   #26
codeman671
Senior Member
 
codeman671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,522
Thanks: 97
Thanked 369 Times in 236 Posts
Default

We never had a problem with lcd televisions left in an unheated house all winter.

We had a few problems with appliances that were not properly blown out of all water. The contractor that winterized the place did not get all of the water out of the ice maker system in our fridge and commercial ice machine which caused a few plastic fittings to crack. Both were easy fixes which I took care of.

One other time they did not take apart the mixing valve in the shower. Some water was left inside which cracked the plastic in the valve assembly. After that each year he took them complete apart.
codeman671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2014, 11:05 AM   #27
Blue Thunder
Senior Member
 
Blue Thunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Eastern MA & Frye Island/Sebago Lake, Maine
Posts: 818
Thanks: 202
Thanked 234 Times in 108 Posts
Default neat little trick...

As far as the ice maker goes, I made up a little rig with a lamp cord with a plug on one end and two alligator clips on the other. When I have the compressor hooked up and am blowing all the other lines I just attach the alligator clips to the connector on the water valve on the back of the fridge and plug it into the fridge receptacle two or three times for a second or two. All blown out!!!!
__________________
" Live for today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come"
Blue Thunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 08:59 AM   #28
Flylady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: So. California & Lakes Region
Posts: 192
Thanks: 128
Thanked 54 Times in 27 Posts
Default Little Things.......Keurig /Coffee makers

For Keurig machine type coffee makers.......hard to completely empty the water reserve tank which heats the water..........I'll let you know what happened in the spring
Flylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 09:07 AM   #29
ishoot308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Gilford, NH / Welch Island
Posts: 4,137
Thanks: 1,448
Thanked 2,937 Times in 1,117 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flylady View Post
For Keurig machine type coffee makers.......hard to completely empty the water reserve tank which heats the water..........I'll let you know what happened in the spring
Been there, done that!... Almost impossible to get all the water out. It will crack and leak like a sieve! I even tried blowing it out with an air compressor with no luck. I have ruined through two of them from freezing. Take your Keurig out for the winter and bring back in spring. If you use your cottage in the winter get a regular cheapo Mr Coffee or similar. That's what I do now.

Dan
__________________
It's Always Sunny On Welch Island!!
ishoot308 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 09:46 AM   #30
jrc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Hollis/Gilford
Posts: 2,688
Thanks: 33
Thanked 437 Times in 247 Posts
Default

LCDs have no problem with cold, they all survive unheated truck rides shipping them to the stores.

As for Keurig, maybe try filling them with cheap vodka?

My drip coffee machine and two LCD TVs, all survived many winters on the boat. The LCD backlight on my marine GPS burned out this year after 8 years but that's just a fluorescent tube.
jrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 09:55 AM   #31
SIKSUKR
Senior Member
 
SIKSUKR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5,061
Thanks: 215
Thanked 893 Times in 505 Posts
Default

Heres what I found on Keurigs website.2 Q&A's that seem to contradict themselves.

How do I drain and store the brewer?

Once your Keurig home brewer has been primed, you cannot empty the water from the inside. The internal tank of the brewer cannot be drained. If you need to store your brewer, empty the removable water reservoir and store your brewer in a safe and frost-free environment. Please be sure to store your brewer in its upright position to avoid water leakage from the inner tank. If you store the brewer in a cold environment, you run the risk of water freezing inside the brewer and causing damage. When you prepare to use it after storage, we recommend rinsing the removable water reservoir with fresh water and running three cleansing brews without a portion pack. If you plan to move your brewer to a different location, turn the brewer off, unplug it and empty the removable water reservoir. If your brewer has been in an environment below freezing, please be sure to let it warm to room temperature for two hours before brewing.

How do I empty the internal Hot Water Tank?

Brewer must be powered off but plugged in.
 •  Lower the Cold Water Reservoir Lid.
 •  Place a mug on the Drip Tray.
 •  Press and hold down the BREW Button and continue to hold until all the water is dispensed into the mug.
There will be a 3 to 5 second delay before water begins to dispense
__________________
SIKSUKR
SIKSUKR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 10:13 AM   #32
ishoot308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Gilford, NH / Welch Island
Posts: 4,137
Thanks: 1,448
Thanked 2,937 Times in 1,117 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SIKSUKR View Post
Heres what I found on Keurigs website.2 Q&A's that seem to contradict themselves.

How do I drain and store the brewer?

Once your Keurig home brewer has been primed, you cannot empty the water from the inside. The internal tank of the brewer cannot be drained. If you need to store your brewer, empty the removable water reservoir and store your brewer in a safe and frost-free environment. Please be sure to store your brewer in its upright position to avoid water leakage from the inner tank. If you store the brewer in a cold environment, you run the risk of water freezing inside the brewer and causing damage. When you prepare to use it after storage, we recommend rinsing the removable water reservoir with fresh water and running three cleansing brews without a portion pack. If you plan to move your brewer to a different location, turn the brewer off, unplug it and empty the removable water reservoir. If your brewer has been in an environment below freezing, please be sure to let it warm to room temperature for two hours before brewing.

How do I empty the internal Hot Water Tank?

Brewer must be powered off but plugged in.
   Lower the Cold Water Reservoir Lid.
   Place a mug on the Drip Tray.
   Press and hold down the BREW Button and continue to hold until all the water is dispensed into the mug.
There will be a 3 to 5 second delay before water begins to dispense
Tried step #2 and it did not work. Still residual water left in lines which freezes and cracks lines. Even tried blowing this water out...no luck!

I love jrc's vodka idea! I bet that would work...I would just hate to have to replace a 3rd Keurig!!

Dan
__________________
It's Always Sunny On Welch Island!!
ishoot308 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 10:39 AM   #33
Happy Gourmand
Senior Member
 
Happy Gourmand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Meredith NH and Ruskin FL
Posts: 1,022
Thanks: 179
Thanked 322 Times in 179 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flylady View Post
For Keurig machine type coffee makers.......hard to completely empty the water reserve tank which heats the water..........I'll let you know what happened in the spring
We pack ours up and take it home for the winter. No way to drain it that we know of.
Happy Gourmand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 11:37 AM   #34
Kamper
Senior Member
 
Kamper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Thornton's Ferry
Posts: 1,195
Thanks: 65
Thanked 141 Times in 105 Posts
Default

For my camper, I use one of those little red hand pumps to force anti-freeze into the lines after I blow them out. You can probably get an electric pump to do that with a house. Open the faucets in turn so you force the stuff to one line at a time and have an observer tell you when the anti-freeze starts to come out and then close that faucet. Move on to the next line, etc...

After that allow gravity to drain the lines into a bucket and toss the into the drains so they don't freeze.

The only time I winterized a house, the owner didn't want anti-freeze. It probably didn't matter because his adult children kept sneaking into the house after I was done and never blew out the lines again.
Kamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 06:27 PM   #35
Flylady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: So. California & Lakes Region
Posts: 192
Thanks: 128
Thanked 54 Times in 27 Posts
Default Keurig.....

Thanks for sharing your experiences. I'll pack it up and drop it off with someone , where I can retrieve it next spring when I return. No guarentee I'll make the trip back by auto next spring.
Flylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 09:13 PM   #36
Bumble2249
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 195
Thanks: 191
Thanked 49 Times in 38 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by winterh View Post
I have a shed that I store a lot of my outside stuff in.Last winter some squirrels or something chewed through the water trampoline that was folded up. Whats the best way to keep them away?

Mr. Remington...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Using Tapatalk
Bumble2249 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 03:59 PM   #37
JasonG
Senior Member
 
JasonG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 310
Thanks: 48
Thanked 45 Times in 33 Posts
Default

A friend of mine in FL has a home inspection service. For a small monthly fee he can check out your property as often as you like and inspected every possible thing that could go wrong due to it being unoccupied. I am sure something like this exists up there.

In fact, he says it is required for insurance purposes if you are vacant more than 30 or 60 days at a time to be covered in the event of a burst pipe, etc. He works with a lot of snowboards.
JasonG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 07:51 PM   #38
Dad sold the C * C
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 261
Thanks: 98
Thanked 58 Times in 37 Posts
Default Just can't resist

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonG View Post
. He works with a lot of snowboards.
My assumption was that most snowboarders don't own 2 homes

..... And for the record; I ski and snowboard
Dad sold the C * C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2014, 05:42 AM   #39
Kamper
Senior Member
 
Kamper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Thornton's Ferry
Posts: 1,195
Thanks: 65
Thanked 141 Times in 105 Posts
Default

I think he meant "snow birds." Maybe "snow broads," but I don't think "snow boards," need much supervision.

Kamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2014, 06:32 AM   #40
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,564
Thanks: 454
Thanked 799 Times in 552 Posts
Default

I am so glad he made that typo! It made my morning!!!
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.37739 seconds