Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > History
Home Forums Gallery YouTube Channel Classifieds Links Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-16-2006, 08:04 PM   #1
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default Roxmont Poultry Barn - Winnipesaukee Inn - Geneva Point Center

on Moultonborough Neck.

The building pictured above was originally built as a barn, then converted to an Inn and now is part of the Geneva Point Conference Center.

Geneva Point is located just about in the middle of the map on Moultonborough Neck on the north side.

I've had the postcard for some time but never knew where it was located. Then I came across a brochure for the New Hotel Weirs and the whole back of the booklet was dedicated to the Winnipesaukee Inn which I've reproduced below. Turns out that both establishments were owned by the same gentleman, J. Alphonzo Greene. Quite a colorful character.

It wasn't until a ran across several Weirs Times articles as well as the web pages of the Lake Winnipesaukee Historical Society that I put the story together. The links are provided below. (The Weirs Times articles require PDF Adobe Acrobat Reader)

TIMELINE & READER'S DIGEST VERSION

Dr. Rueben Greene was a doctor in NYC who treated nervous disorders with one prescription that was quite successful. It was called Nervura, "the great blood and nerve remedy". In short he made a fortune which was shared with his sons, Doctors J. Alfonzo and Frank E. Greene. In the summer of 1889 Dr. J. A. Greene purchased two properties on Long Island; one for himself and one for his brother. His brother constructed the Windermere Estate while J. Alfonzo constructed the Roxmont Castle. In 1890 J. Alfonzo purchased four adjoining farms on Geneva Point and began the Roxmont Poultry Farm. It was hugely successful. In 1891 he purchased the steamboat called the Carroll in New York and had it shipped to Lakeport. He changed the name to the Roxmont. In later years it was more popularly known as Belle of the Isles. The Inn was built in 1907. Portions may have previously used as a poultry barn. The brochure is reproduced below. In 1919 the property was purchased by the International Sunday School Association.

Windermere Estate

J. Alfonzo's Roxmont Castle

Roxmont Castle

J. Alfonzo Greene

Belle of the Isles

More information on Windermere....click below
http://www.lwhs.us/moult-windermerejewel.htm

more on Windermere....
http://www.lwhs.us/mou-windemere.htm

Weirs Times articles....see pp. 7, 12 and 13
http://www.weirs.com/archivepdfs/Endicott.pdf

Weirs Times article....see pp. 7, 24 and 25
http://www.weirs.com/archivepdfs/wtimes122905.pdf

Here's the advertisement for the Inn...had to be between 1907 and 1919.



mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2006, 08:13 PM   #2
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default The Winnipesaukee Inn












mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2006, 08:25 PM   #3
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default The Geneva Point Conference Center


Aerial View Postcard of Geneva Point



Link to Aerial Map of Geneva Point Center....
http://www.birdseyeviews.com/SampleGenevaPtlarge.htm



Link to Geneva Point Site....
http://www.genevapoint.org/

See photos of the "barn" today....

if you have any memories or photos of this place PLEASE add them here!
mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2006, 03:44 PM   #4
Rattlesnake Gal
Senior Member
 
Rattlesnake Gal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Southern NH
Posts: 5,228
Thanks: 1,393
Thanked 1,320 Times in 464 Posts
Thumbs up Thanks McD!

Good thinking - not wanting Consumptive (Tuberculosis) patients around!

McDude, thanks for sharing this excellent piece of ephemera.
Rattlesnake Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2006, 06:17 PM   #5
Resident 2B
Senior Member
 
Resident 2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Bradenton, FL and North Shore, MA
Posts: 1,331
Thanks: 922
Thanked 295 Times in 150 Posts
Default Great Information

McDude,

For years now, I have been trying to learn as much as possible about the history of our great lake. Your information is so fantastic to read.

Thank you for your work in gathering this information and for sharing it with the folks like me who are so very interested in learning about what happened before we got here.

R2B
Resident 2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 01-17-2006, 08:06 PM   #6
secondcurve
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,014
Thanks: 1,102
Thanked 527 Times in 268 Posts
Default Wonderful Post

McDude:

Thanks for a nice piece of history. Wouldn't it be awesome to be able to travel back in time and spend a summer at Winnipesaukee a hundred years ago!

McDude: I am curious. How much have you spent on post cards and historical pieces relating to the Lakes Region? I know it is none of my business, but I thought I'd ask!

RG: Thanks for defining the word consumptive. I was about to look it up! Did you know what it meant or did you look it up yourself?
secondcurve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2006, 03:16 PM   #7
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by secondcurve
McDude: I am curious. How much have you spent on post cards and historical pieces relating to the Lakes Region? I know it is none of my business, but I thought I'd ask!
secondcurve: ...well I can't give away all my secrets but you'll find a hint below! This is just my way of contributing back to the website.
Attached Images
 
mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 10:12 AM   #8
fpartri497
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Concord NH
Posts: 681
Thanks: 97
Thanked 47 Times in 38 Posts
Default Mcdude-historian

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdude
secondcurve: ...well I can't give away all my secrets but you'll find a hint below! This is just my way of contributing back to the website.
Mcdude:

you deserve the high honour of being named the official Winnipesaukee forum Historian. Thank You from all of us

fpartri497
__________________
dont worry be happy
fpartri497 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 10:55 AM   #9
Rattlesnake Gal
Senior Member
 
Rattlesnake Gal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Southern NH
Posts: 5,228
Thanks: 1,393
Thanked 1,320 Times in 464 Posts
Default Tb

Quote:
Originally Posted by secondcurve
RG: Thanks for defining the word consumptive. I was about to look it up! Did you know what it meant or did you look it up yourself?

Guess I missed your question secondcurve. Sorry about that.
No, I didn't have to look it up... I just watch too much History Channel and have read to many historical romance novels.
The old west interests me greatly too. (I'm sure my love of history doesn't surprise anyone here.)
Did you know that the infamous Doc Holliday died of consumption?
Be thankful for inoculations, dying like this was not pleasant way to go.
Rattlesnake Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2006, 08:21 PM   #10
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Talking Geneva Point in 1926












another new postcard 4/8/06

Last edited by mcdude; 04-09-2006 at 02:38 PM.
mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2006, 08:34 AM   #11
jessj
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Geneva Point History

Hi McDude,
I am a secretary at Geneva Point Center and I was wondering if you could maybe rewrite this information so that we could display it for visitors. You have some great history here and if you are willing, we would really like to use it! You can reach me at our email address: register@geneva.org
Thank you!
jessj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2006, 06:18 AM   #12
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default

Dear Geneva Point Register:
I have tried to contact you several times and my e-mails keep getting returned. McD
mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2006, 09:17 PM   #13
RI Swamp Yankee
Senior Member
 
RI Swamp Yankee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: North Kingstown RI
Posts: 688
Thanks: 143
Thanked 83 Times in 55 Posts
Default

That may not be a working mail server

E-mail Tester results for register@geneva.org
Generated by www.DNSstuff.com

Getting MX record for geneva.org (from local DNS server, may be cached)... Received a SERVER FAILURE response.

This should be treated as an ERROR (per RFC974), and the E-mail delivery should PROBABLY be retried later.
__________________
Gene ~ aka "another RI Swamp Yankee"
RI Swamp Yankee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2007, 02:38 PM   #14
mcdude
Senior Member
 
mcdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Rock Haven Lake - West Newfield, ME
Posts: 5,070
Thanks: 307
Thanked 717 Times in 345 Posts
Default

Quote:
The second of
t of these two men to arrive in that decade
was Dr. J. A. Greene, who came to the Lakes

Region in 1885. Although possessed of a medical

degree, the good doctor did not practice medicine. He
was independently wealthy, being one of the heirs of the
“Nervura” patent medicine fortune. Dr. Greene was
enchanted by the beauty of the Lakes Region, and
soon his brother, Dr. F. E. Greene, and his sister,

Mrs. George W. Armstrong,
came to see this place he
had praised so highly. When they and their
families had seen the lovely sheet of water, which the



Red Man had euphonically
named Winnipesaukee, or
“Beautiful Water in a High Place,” they knew that Dr.



J. A. had been too stingy in his description of it. Barely

has a family not born there fallen so deeply in love with
this beautiful lake. Dr. J. A. Greene soon
purchased land atop the hill on Long island
overlooking the bridge, and built a replica of a
medieval European castle. Following this, land was
purchased on the lower end of Moultonborough Neck,
where the Roxmont Poultry Farm was established, with
the doctor’s son, Frank A. Greene, as manager.
Dr . F . E. Gr e e n e purchased the Lamprey
farm on the lower end of Long Island and in 1889
built the luxurious summer home that still dominates
those broad acres. M r s . G e o r g e W .
Armstrong and her husband purchased a large
tract of land on the western approach to Centre Harbor
and established there one of the showplaces of the
Lakes Region.

Thus arrived the Greene family, and their coming


was to have a significant
impact upon this section of

the Granite State. Dr. J. A. Greene was an
astute businessman. He was a complete extrovert
and this, together with a
fine sense of humor, made


him very popular. He was soon being proposed as a


candidate for public office.
Although he campaigned

at various times for the
office of congressman and


for governor, he never quite succeeded in winning

nomination against his locally-born opponents.
That Dr. Greene was well-liked and much admired is
shown by a widely copied article that appeared in the
Veterans’ Advocate, a paper that was very popular with
veterans of the Civil War:
C omr a d e Dr . J . A .
Greene, of Long Island, Town of Moultonborough,
is mentioned as a possible candidate for governor of
this state. The doctor is a veteran
and accompanied General Freemont in his second
expedition to Pike’s Peak in 1860; enlisted in the First
Colorado Cavalry at the age of sixteen, and to use
one of the doctor’s favorite expressions, “I was one
of the few privates who remained in the ranks
throughout the entire war”. Twice wounded he carried
the marks of several bullets in his face and wrist,
and received permanent injuries by being thrown
from his horse. For many years he was a member of
Gettysburg Post, No. 191 of Boston, and much against
the wishes of the Post, he was transferred to Darius
A. Drake Post, of Lakeport.
In 1901 Dr. Greene was
elected mayor of the City of Laconia and served in that
capacity for two years. While Dr. Greene was
receiving public attention, a boat named CARROLL
arrived on the scene, and was soon to become



identified with him. Carroll
was brought to the lake
from upper New York State, where she had been used as
a canal hoat. After a couple of seasons, during which
she was used as a partv boat, she was purchased by
Dr. J. A. Greene, who had her rebuilt and changed
her name to Roxmont. She was put into regular
service, running from Roxmont Poultry Farm to
Lake Village, with stops at Melvin Village, Union
Wharf, Long Island, Birch Island, Jolly Island and the Weirs.
Her Captain was Wilbur Lamprey and
Dr. J. A., whose enjoyment of steamboating knew no
bounds, acted as engineer. When the wharf at The
Weirs would be crowded with summer visitors, it
was Dr. J. A.’s greatest delight to wipe a smear
across his forehead with an oily rag, then climb up
out of the engine room to where he could he seen,
and hear the shocked summer visitors inquire,
“Is that greasy-looking man the famous Dr. Greene?”
L e v i Bl a k e , j o v i a l proprietor of the Island
Home, a summer hotel adjoining Dr. J. A.’s estate
on Long Island, often acted as straight man to the



doctor’s rapid-fire wit. On
one occasion when Levi
was “feeling poorly,” as he would have expressed it,
Dr. J. A. suggested, “Why don’t you try a bottle of
Nervura,, Levi?” “Huh!” snorted Levi, “I’d
just as soon have a glass of my well water.”


“It would probably do you
just as much good,” was
the quick reply. “Did you ever hear of
anybody who was helped by Nervura?” asked Levi.
“Yes, I did,” answered the doctor.
"Who was it? persisted Levi.
“J. A. Greene!” was the quick reply. It is perhaps
needless to say that the loudest laughter came from
Levi Blake. Increased business
interests soon forced Dr. Greene to give up
his favorite hobby, so he retired from his short
career as a steamboat engineer and turned over
the management of the steamer Roxmont to his
son, Frank. Business was good enough so that
by 1895 a contract was arranged with the Boston
and Maine Railroad for Roxmont to run as a feeder
line to the steamer Mt. Washington.
This arrangemen t
lasted only a year, after which poor management
by the younger Greene caused the closing of the
Roxmont Poultry Farm and the steamer Roxmont
was withdrawn from trade. She was hauled out of
the water on the shore of the farm property. Her
next appearance was to be under another name, but
more of that later.

Great stands of virgin timber graced the shores
of Lake Winnipesaukee in the nineteenth century.
Much of it was white pine and hemlock, but there
were also groves of oak, ash, maple and other
hardwoods. A large part of this timber was cut during
the winter months, hauled onto the ice-covered lake
on sleds drawn by horses or by the more surefooted
oxen, and placed in sheltered coves. Booms
fashioned from strings of logs fastened end to end
were placed around the logs to contain them after
the ice had melted in the spring. Before the logs could he
towed to the sawmills, they had to he formed into rafts.
Rafting was a relatively slow job. First, rafting
poles were cut. These were saplings, usually of gray
birch, and not over 3 inches in diameter at the thick
end. U-shaped bows of thin tough hardwood, together

......


available help, turned to, and in a remarkably
short time a great raft took shape. In addition to the
conventional methods of rafting, the metal staples
and chains were used, and the completed but loosely
formed raft was entirely enclosed in a boom.
At dusk on a quiet evening, both MAID OF
THE ISLES and MINEOLA attached their long manila
towlines to the immense raft and started a tow that
ended before daylight next morning with the safe
delivery at the sorting boom in Meredith of slightly over
one million board feet of timber! It was a tow of
approximately 20 miles, and it was the largest and
fastest tow ever made on Lake Winnipesaukee
It had been a calculated risk, because the chance
of a breakup of the raft was ever-present, but it
paid off.

Immediately the pencils of competing boatmen started
scribbling, and soon came the stunning thought that
these two boats had earned $1500 for a tow of less than
five hours. The reaction was, “If they can do it, so
can we. Why, we can even make money at $1.00 per
thousand.
Reason was obscured by envy. They did not take
into consideration the tremendous towing power
of these two steamboats. the shortcuts that could be

used in rafting if they waited for the right weather, and
the many other factors. So, the price was cut to
$1.00 per thousand feet. Financial losses caused by
broken rafts, long delays and damage suits followed,
and soon the towing price returned to the original

figure.


After the turn of the century, the diminishing
sup p l y o f s t and ing timber and the rapidly
increasing number of motorboats, whose safety
would be endangered by
loose floating logs, finally


eliminated this source of income for steamboat men.
Today, logs may not legally be towed in state waters of
New Hampshire.
.

Excerpts from an Article that appeared in the Weirs Times
October 4, 2007 - "Concerning a Newspaper, Chickens and Logs"

See COMPLETE ARTICLE here.
(requires pdf)
mcdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.16763 seconds