Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > General Discussion
Home Forums Gallery Webcams Blogs YouTube Channel Classifieds Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-05-2022, 07:11 AM   #1
Steveo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 523
Thanks: 47
Thanked 123 Times in 63 Posts
Default New construction in Alton Bay

I took my first cruise of the season around Alton Bay. There seems to be a lot of new construction and expansion construction (additions, decks, docks) going on. Many of these were done on raised homes, burned down homes, or existing homes. In almost every case the new buildings were quite a bit greater than the original footprint and were within 50Ft of shoreline. I don't understand how these places get the necessary permits. I'd hate to think there is some significant "cash flow permissions" going on. Part of me doesn't mind since I live in Alton and it raises the tax base.
Steveo is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Steveo For This Useful Post:
tbonies (05-06-2022)
Old 05-05-2022, 08:09 AM   #2
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,438
Thanks: 722
Thanked 1,389 Times in 963 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steveo View Post
I took my first cruise of the season around Alton Bay. There seems to be a lot of new construction and expansion construction (additions, decks, docks) going on. Many of these were done on raised homes, burned down homes, or existing homes. In almost every case the new buildings were quite a bit greater than the original footprint and were within 50Ft of shoreline. I don't understand how these places get the necessary permits. I'd hate to think there is some significant "cash flow permissions" going on. Part of me doesn't mind since I live in Alton and it raises the tax base.
If the original footprint was within 50ft of the shoreline they can build there again while expanding the rest of the house. We took our first little ride Sunday and thought there was more dock damage than usual.
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2022, 12:52 PM   #3
TiltonBB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gilford, NH and Florida
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 650
Thanked 2,164 Times in 906 Posts
Default

I don't believe you can make it any more non-conforming. So yes, if the existing building was within 50 feet you can rebuild on that footprint but cannot increase the dimension within the 50 foot setback. Height is a dimension so that means you cannot increase the height either.

Any addition would have to conform to existing town and state setbacks and regulations.
TiltonBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2022, 05:55 PM   #4
Weekend Pundit
Senior Member
 
Weekend Pundit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Gilford
Posts: 302
Thanks: 21
Thanked 54 Times in 33 Posts
Post Indeed

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltonBB View Post
I don't believe you can make it any more non-conforming. So yes, if the existing building was within 50 feet you can rebuild on that footprint but cannot increase the dimension within the 50 foot setback. Height is a dimension so that means you cannot increase the height either.

Any addition would have to conform to existing town and state setbacks and regulations.
That certainly is the case in Gilford.

A number of folks have come before the Planning Board or Town Planner's office over the past few years wanting to do just that and were told they couldn't. Some complained but they were told to take it up with the state since we couldn't override the state.

I guess some folks don't like hearing "No".

Last edited by Weekend Pundit; 05-05-2022 at 05:57 PM. Reason: Typo
Weekend Pundit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2022, 06:12 PM   #5
barefootbay
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 367
Thanks: 66
Thanked 89 Times in 64 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steveo View Post
I took my first cruise of the season around Alton Bay. There seems to be a lot of new construction and expansion construction (additions, decks, docks) going on. Many of these were done on raised homes, burned down homes, or existing homes. In almost every case the new buildings were quite a bit greater than the original footprint and were within 50Ft of shoreline. I don't understand how these places get the necessary permits. I'd hate to think there is some significant "cash flow permissions" going on. Part of me doesn't mind since I live in Alton and it raises the tax base.
Also using the same outdated septic systems . Money talks !
barefootbay is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 05-05-2022, 06:41 PM   #6
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,438
Thanks: 722
Thanked 1,389 Times in 963 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by barefootbay View Post
Also using the same outdated septic systems . Money talks !
Not necessarily. If you rebuild you have to put in a new septic system.
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 06:35 AM   #7
TiltonBB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gilford, NH and Florida
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 650
Thanked 2,164 Times in 906 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by barefootbay View Post
Also using the same outdated septic systems . Money talks !
I have done some building and improvements on waterfront properties in Laconia and Gilford and have never seen any evidence that "money talks". I wouldn't be so quick to jump to that conclusion.

Several times, I have gone to Concord and sat down with DES people, including one who posts here, to go over plans and seek approvals. The answers were informative and direct and I was told what was, and what was not, permissible. They are always willing to answer questions and I think that is a good place to start if you seek to make changes on a waterfront property.

It was not always what I wanted to hear but I left understanding exactly what was allowed.

Unless you have direct knowledge that something illegal has happened I would refrain from making reckless allegations.
TiltonBB is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to TiltonBB For This Useful Post:
Cobalt 25 (12-19-2023), Pine Island Guy (12-13-2023), upthesaukee (05-06-2022), wolfegirl (05-30-2022)
Old 05-06-2022, 06:44 AM   #8
Steveo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 523
Thanks: 47
Thanked 123 Times in 63 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltonBB View Post
I don't believe you can make it any more non-conforming. So yes, if the existing building was within 50 feet you can rebuild on that footprint but cannot increase the dimension within the 50 foot setback. Height is a dimension so that means you cannot increase the height either.

Any addition would have to conform to existing town and state setbacks and regulations.
There are houses where it is clear that they go beyond the footprint within the 50 foot setback. I'm not trying to accuse anyone of anything, just trying to find out how they do it.
Steveo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 07:21 AM   #9
TiltonBB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gilford, NH and Florida
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 650
Thanked 2,164 Times in 906 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steveo View Post
There are houses where it is clear that they go beyond the footprint within the 50 foot setback. I'm not trying to accuse anyone of anything, just trying to find out how they do it.
There are times and ways that you can trade off non conforming to make it more conforming. In other words, if you remove say 200 Sq. feet that is non conforming and expand something else by 190 Sq feet it is my understanding that would be allowed, within reason, as they see it as overall better and the result is a building that is more conforming than prior to construction.

For example: I think, if you had a 10 X 15 tool shed within the setback and said you would remove it to add 110 Sq feet to the house they might look favorably on it.

That is my opinion but I think every situation is evaluated based on its merits.
TiltonBB is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to TiltonBB For This Useful Post:
TheTimeTraveler (05-06-2022)
Old 05-06-2022, 09:45 AM   #10
codeman671
Senior Member
 
codeman671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,376
Thanks: 213
Thanked 768 Times in 451 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltonBB View Post
I don't believe you can make it any more non-conforming. So yes, if the existing building was within 50 feet you can rebuild on that footprint but cannot increase the dimension within the 50 foot setback. Height is a dimension so that means you cannot increase the height either.

Any addition would have to conform to existing town and state setbacks and regulations.
Our island property is non-conforming to both town and state standards, the front wall is 30 feet from the water. Due to the age of the property, we were able to file with DES to add a 12' deep by 40' wide deck spanning the front. DES had no problem as there is an RSA that allows this (age built). The real battle was with Meredith, we had to go for a variance. We had our surveyor pleaded the case, they argued and finally granted it.

Meredith has a 75' setback, and being that the house is 30' deep the entire structure is non-confirming in their eyes.

I will say the building inspector in Meredith was great to deal with.
codeman671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 10:07 AM   #11
TiltonBB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gilford, NH and Florida
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 650
Thanked 2,164 Times in 906 Posts
Default

I think they look at decks different than buildings. I would think if you asked to put the same size living space addition to the house the answer would be a firm no.
TiltonBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 10:43 AM   #12
winterh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 230
Thanks: 21
Thanked 119 Times in 54 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltonBB View Post
There are times and ways that you can trade off non conforming to make it more conforming. In other words, if you remove say 200 Sq. feet that is non conforming and expand something else by 190 Sq feet it is my understanding that would be allowed, within reason, as they see it as overall better and the result is a building that is more conforming than prior to construction.

For example: I think, if you had a 10 X 15 tool shed within the setback and said you would remove it to add 110 Sq feet to the house they might look favorably on it.

That is my opinion but I think every situation is evaluated based on its merits.
Going through it now and this exactly what they do. You make tradeoffs that get both parties closer to what they want.
winterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 06:46 PM   #13
Weekend Pundit
Senior Member
 
Weekend Pundit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Gilford
Posts: 302
Thanks: 21
Thanked 54 Times in 33 Posts
Default That Depends

Quote:
Originally Posted by tis View Post
Not necessarily. If you rebuild you have to put in a new septic system.
If sewer is available you may be required to connect rather than putting in a new septic system if you rebuild. The federally funded system was built to come into compliance with the federal Clean Water Act. Too many septic systems were not well maintained and were contaminating the lake, hence the Winnipesaukee River Basin Program sewer system.

Last edited by Weekend Pundit; 05-06-2022 at 07:22 PM.
Weekend Pundit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2022, 10:03 PM   #14
Descant
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Merrimack and Welch Island
Posts: 4,069
Thanks: 1,226
Thanked 1,530 Times in 989 Posts
Default Winnipesaukee river project

Agreed. The Winnipesaukee River Basin Project from ~1965 was a great step forward. A similar project on the east side of the lake going down towards Dover would be wonderful. After the next elections, write to your federal delegation. Stewart Lamprey, a past Rep and Senator was the one who pushed that project. I think NH state Senator Chuck Morse also supports clean water projects. I served on a related committee with him a few years ago. Smart man.
Descant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2023, 05:00 PM   #15
TownieRinker27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

That construction boom in Alton Bay sounds a lot like what happened in my neighbourhood last summer. I was actually working on adding a deck to my own house at the time. Getting the permits was a real headache, so I can imagine the process for those larger projects must be even more complex, especially close to the shoreline.

For my deck project, I had to rent a couple of heavy-duty trucks to bring in the timber and other materials. Those trucks were lifesavers, considering the amount of stuff we needed. It was my first time handling such a big DIY project, and seeing those big trucks pull up with all the supplies made it all feel very real. It definitely gave me a new appreciation for the scale of these larger construction projects around the lake.
TownieRinker27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.25454 seconds