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Old 01-22-2018, 04:34 PM   #1
Descant
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Default Island Solar?

On another thread(Welch Island Power), NHSolar suggests that solar power has a lot of advantages for continuous power on an island when the grid is not operating and won't be repaired until after ice-out. I'm curious, but didn't want to hijack the Welch Island thread.

With due respect to the Shoreland Water Quality Protection Act, many of us are surrounded by trees. We certainly don't have open lots and often will not have south facing roofs. Docks and breakwaters often are not more than 40-50 feet long and the adjacent trees are 75-100 feet tall. Easy solution? Can I safely put panels on a dock or breakwater? Too shady, esp. on the north side of an island?
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Old 01-22-2018, 07:11 PM   #2
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A really good question, but I would guess that the DES would look at panels mounted on a dock in the same manner that they look at canopies; they could only be used seasonally and must not obstruct a neighbors view. If you did have to remove them for winter it kinda defeats the whole purpose in regard to winter security and being able to maintain dock circulators during a sketchy ice power outage.
If however it were somehow possible bi-facial panels would work great in this application because they would gain a very significant amount of backside power from the reflection off the water.
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Old 01-23-2018, 07:03 PM   #3
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You have to be totally off the grid for continuous power and need a battery.


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Old 01-24-2018, 12:37 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by NH.Solar View Post
A really good question, but I would guess that the DES would look at panels mounted on a dock in the same manner that they look at canopies; they could only be used seasonally and must not obstruct a neighbors view. If you did have to remove them for winter it kinda defeats the whole purpose in regard to winter security and being able to maintain dock circulators during a sketchy ice power outage.
If however it were somehow possible bi-facial panels would work great in this application because they would gain a very significant amount of backside power from the reflection off the water.
Www.SAF-USA.com they are integrating PV into siding now as well for homes who’s roofs are not in direct light. Id imagine if your lake front faces south you should be able to catch some good rays during the day while also adding an additional R value of insulation!
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Old 01-24-2018, 01:05 PM   #5
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You have to be totally off the grid for continuous power and need a battery.
Not quite. You need a battery, but you do not need to be off the grid. Install solar and battery. The Sun charges your battery then sends energy to the grid. When the grid goes down, your battery kicks in.
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Old 01-24-2018, 02:02 PM   #6
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Not quite. You need a battery, but you do not need to be off the grid. Install solar and battery. The Sun charges your battery then sends energy to the grid. When the grid goes down, your battery kicks in.
I thought that if you were connected to the grid, the battery cannot be used in the event of a power failure?
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Old 01-24-2018, 03:07 PM   #7
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I thought that if you were connected to the grid, the battery cannot be used in the event of a power failure?
Nope, a hybrid solar system with Lithium batteries can do it.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:08 PM   #8
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This excellent short video link is already in the Welch Island thread, but I think it is worth re-posting here; the StorEdge solution
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Old 01-25-2018, 08:06 AM   #9
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Default DES and Solar Panels

I managed a project back in 2010. They owners insist on going solar. Because of the shoreline protection act, the trees cannot be removed for the solar panels to be effective. And they are tall trees!

The building inspector and the state agreed upon 'temporary' panels along the shore. As long as the panels are not permanently 'fix', they can be used. I'm trying to find pictures of the installation, but basically the panels are placed so that they can be easily removed. You can see the installation on Rocky Pond in Gilmanton.

I thing Shorething can chime in on any changes since 2010.
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:39 AM   #10
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Nope, a hybrid solar system with Lithium batteries can do it.
Wouldn't a battery backed system still need some type of interlock so that it was not back feeding the grid, much like with a generator?
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:52 AM   #11
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Wouldn't a battery backed system still need some type of interlock so that it was not back feeding the grid, much like with a generator?
A short answer to that is yes, a long answer would have to be given by a someone who knows how hybrid vs other battery backup solar systems work when they are hooked to the grid.
Maybe forum member "NH.Solar" can help answer your question.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:15 PM   #12
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A solar system equipped with a hybrid inverter and battery is able to take the power being generated by the panels and; 1.use it either directly in the home, 2.charge the battery, 3.or feed the excess power back into the grid for utility company credits ...as long as the grid remains live.
If the grid should go down a hybrid inverter instantly disconnects from the grid, but it remains live and connected to the solar array and battery. The energy from the solar panels can then still be either used directly by the home or to maintain the charge in the battery. A single LG RESU or the competitive Tesla Powerwall can only power about 30 amps and the loads need to be carefully chosen and wired into a separate essential loads panel. The weather, time of year, and the consumers conservation habits will determine how much total power will be available during a prolonged outage, but it should be enough to carry a homes essential functions indefinitely even if the outage is very prolonged. Hurricane Sandy was a major impetus to the rapid development that has taken place in hybrid solar/battery backup systems in just the last few years.
A solar system equipped with a regular inverter and no energy storage must instantly be shut down in the event of a power outage. This is done to prevent backfeeding power from the solar array into the broken grid and causing harm to the linesmen working to repair it. The house would thus have no power from either the grid or the solar system. Unfortunately a lot of folks on the Jersey shore with simple solar systems were not aware of this requirement until after the hurricane and their homes had no power for weeks on end.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:26 PM   #13
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Thank you NH.Solar.
This is how I understand Hybrid Solar, I just couldn't put it in words that would make sense to anyone.
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