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Old 10-26-2017, 12:23 PM   #1
pjard
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Default Financial Planner

Can anyone recommend a Financial Planner in the area?
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:27 PM   #2
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Default Ask your bank!

Many banks have financial planners on their staff to help you.

I can't find her phone, there was a Holly Harmon that works in Meredith. Fair independent advisor/planner that a number of my friends are happy with!
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:47 PM   #3
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Can anyone recommend a Financial Planner in the area?
Bank of NH in Gilford has someone decent but can't remember his name....

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Old 10-26-2017, 03:06 PM   #4
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There is an Edward Jones office in Meredith on Main St. I'm not recommending them because I've never dealt with that company but I find dealing with a mutual fund company much better than a bank.
I have used Vanguard for over 40 years but they don't have local offices. Try searching Fidelity in the NH lakes region.
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Old 10-26-2017, 03:28 PM   #5
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We use Ameriprise out of Portsmouth. Scott Schamesman is the Senior Financial Advisor. We've been please with our dealings with him over the years.
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Old 10-26-2017, 03:58 PM   #6
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Default Mike Bodnar

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There is an Edward Jones office in Meredith on Main St. I'm not recommending them because I've never dealt with that company but I find dealing with a mutual fund company much better than a bank.
I have used Vanguard for over 40 years but they don't have local offices. Try searching Fidelity in the NH lakes region.
I use Vanguard too, but Mike Bodnar of Edward Jones is a very honest, good guy. Mike can be reached at 738-4217. Good luck.
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Old 10-26-2017, 04:12 PM   #7
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Does he work out of the Meredith office?

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Old 10-26-2017, 04:36 PM   #8
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Default Mike Bodnar

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Does he work out of the Meredith office?

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Mike works out of the Laconia office, across the street from the High School.
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Old 10-26-2017, 04:42 PM   #9
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I never had a financial planner personally. We have done business with First Republic Bank in Boston and they have been extremely forthcoming, honest and respectful in all instances. Once I had a question very late at night so I sent an e-mail. Less than a hour later the officer I mailed called me. I was expecting a reply the following day, not that night.
For all it is worth many planners have advised against my strategy, and if I followed theirs my retirement portfolio would not be as good as it is today.

I am a retired workaholic and continuing aquaholic.
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Old 10-26-2017, 05:25 PM   #10
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Just like anything else you purchase, you have to be diligent in your search and don't put your trust just anybody. This is a good place to ask questions but don't just take our word on it. You don't know anything about any of us.
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Old 10-26-2017, 05:37 PM   #11
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Default Ellen Molnar

https://money.usnews.com/financial-a...molnar-1339829
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Old 10-26-2017, 06:47 PM   #12
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Just like anything else you purchase, you have to be diligent in your search and don't put your trust just anybody. This is a good place to ask questions but don't just take our word on it. You don't know anything about any of us.
Best advice yet!!!

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Old 10-26-2017, 07:26 PM   #13
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There is an Edward Jones office in Meredith on Main St. I'm not recommending them because I've never dealt with that company but I find dealing with a mutual fund company much better than a bank.
I have used Vanguard for over 40 years but they don't have local offices. Try searching Fidelity in the NH lakes region.
If you have over 50k Vanguard offers this service.

https://investor.vanguard.com/financ...nancial-advice


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Old 10-26-2017, 08:29 PM   #14
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All mutual funds will offer this service as they are looking to secure your account. As always anyone's information is as good as the information you give them. I deal with T. Rowe Price mutual fund and have availed myself of their service to keep a check on my thinking.
Not T. Rowe but a planner once told me that I needed bonds in my portfolio as I had none. Should I have gone with that information I would have lots less today.

My philosophy works for me and I surely would not expect anyone to adopt it.

I am a retired workaholic and continuing aquaholic.
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:05 AM   #15
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Default Second for Vanguard

I'm with Doobs on Vanguard. As you'll see on their website, which is corroborated by tons of independent academic research available elsewhere, minimizing financial planning and management costs is critical to long-term returns. The 1%/year that most planners or investment firms charge adds up incredibly when you have a 10-20 year horizon. Furthermore, virtually nobody beats market indexes over extended time periods.

Vanguard will not give you the warm fuzzies that a local face-to-face will, but their telephone support is surprisingly good, and it will leave thousands of dollars more in your pocket.

Good luck!
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:34 AM   #16
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I've been with Vanguard for over 40 years now and I've never been disappointed. Although I've always made my own financial decisions on what funds to buy I have just recently signed up for their advisor servicers. I'm reaching the age where I'm planning on retiring soon and my wife has no clue about our investments. I'm more worried about if something happens to me, she will need someone to advise her if I'm not around or not able to.
Also I've been very good at accumulating money but I feel I need help when I'm at the point where I'm going to start withdrawing funds from my retirement accounts.
Their fee is very low as compared to most advisory services. I only signed up for this service 6 months ago and I've been very impressed with the changes so far.

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Old 10-27-2017, 07:09 PM   #17
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In my mind there are three good mutual funds. Vanguard, although one has to be careful picking the funds, suggest looking into the Vanguard Fund Advisor. Fidelity and T. Rowe Price are also in the top category. T. Rowe may be a little conservative but I pick my own investments. That said I did have a big loss in the past and it took me a little time to recoup and since then all has been good.

I am a retired workaholic and continuing aquaholic.
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Old 10-28-2017, 04:32 PM   #18
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Default Financial Planner

My son has a financial planning business. He's based out of Windham, but is very capable of serving clients in the lakes region. He is a Certified Financial Planner which means he serves his clients in a fiduciary capacity, meaning he is required to put his clients' interests first. His only compensation is the fees he charges his clients, he never receives commissions based on products he recommends. Who ever you work with, I would insist they are a fiduciary and fee only based. His website is www.lakesidefinancialplan.com if you want to check him out.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:38 PM   #19
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It is not clear to me why the OP is looking for a financial planner, but most of the responses seem to focus on where to buy mutual funds, not the services of a CFP. I would see the CFP as helping to clarify goals and the legal documents needed to get there. Portfolio management is a different question. My suggestion is to actually interview people just like you would for any other hiring process. Don't be afraid to negotiate fees. Banks, CFP's etc. can all be flexible on fees and services.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:46 PM   #20
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I agree one first needs to know what you are looking for. Many just charge transaction fees which I don't like but good planners will charge 1% of assets or more depending on balances. But they will have access to trust attorneys, long term care etc. so once you know then it is easier to figure out. Edward Jones from people that I know that use them charge transaction fees.
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Old 10-29-2017, 12:33 AM   #21
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Default Target Funds

Most of the major Fund owners now offer Target Retirement funds. Rebalances every year . All include index funds: U.S index, Global index, Bond indices, even cash for older folks. Could go to a financial planner but if they didnít recommend a Target Retirement fund, Iíd probably drop them. And why pay to get a reco for something Iím already doing? Rules of Thumb: know your investment horizon, everybody regresses to the mean, focus on the efficient frontier, the avoidance of management fees generally places you in the 68th-72nd percentile because you are buying the mean for less, buying individual stocks is gambling (refer to efficient frontier).

Best of luck!
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Old 10-29-2017, 04:03 AM   #22
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I agree one first needs to know what you are looking for. Many just charge transaction fees which I don't like but good planners will charge 1% of assets or more depending on balances. But they will have access to trust attorneys, long term care etc. so once you know then it is easier to figure out. Edward Jones from people that I know that use them charge transaction fees.
Yes, one needs to know what he's looking for. But the 1% per year that you advocate is breathtakingly expensive over time. Paying 1% per year for 20 years will cost you approximately 25% of your total portfolio. It's as if you've decided to give a quarter of your life savings to the planner. As a number of us have noted above, it's best to start with free advice, then be really careful before you give away a quarter of your savings.
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Old 10-29-2017, 06:23 AM   #23
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Wink You're Late...

This discussion had me check on my former financial for-fee advisor. A very engaging advisor, he prepared personalized graphs putting me on a stabile financial track which, and I quote, "Should see me through age 85". That was 25 years ago and now, alas, I'm reading that my first-ever financial advisor died last year.

If you're 10 years from retirement, you're late to have visited a financial advisor.

As multi-millionaire radio advisor Dave Ramsey says, "When the market goes up, I bought stocks. When the market goes down, I bought more stocks. Why? Because over the long run, the stock market offers the greatest gains."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iUJAPR5KAA

Also says, "Get out of debt".

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I agree one first needs to know what you are looking for. Many just charge transaction fees which I don't like but good planners will charge 1% of assets or more depending on balances. But they will have access to trust attorneys, long term care etc. so once you know then it is easier to figure out. Edward Jones from people that I know that use them charge transaction fees.
Though I'd never heard of them, as a new Executor, I was directed to the Edward Jones office in Wolfeboro.

One Edward Jones office sprang up when Bank of America closed their only Florida office—for 30 miles.

Edward Jones' offices are everywhere. I'm presently in a tiny burg smaller than Wolfeboro, and there's two Edward Jones offices here.

Although you'll get just one "Primary Advisor", each office can be helpful in their own way. (Check Depositing, faxing, ordering checks, credit cards, NDIC-insured savings, notary services and grounded information from a local).

Edward Jones Investments have come a long way!

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Old 10-29-2017, 08:59 AM   #24
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Yes, one needs to know what he's looking for. But the 1% per year that you advocate is breathtakingly expensive over time. Paying 1% per year for 20 years will cost you approximately 25% of your total portfolio. It's as if you've decided to give a quarter of your life savings to the planner. As a number of us have noted above, it's best to start with free advice, then be really careful before you give away a quarter of your savings.
Not quite sure I understand the math,...are you saying the 1% adds up to 25% over 20 years of your original investment? In other word 20 years ago you started with 100,000.00 after 20 years of 1% fees it has cost you 25,000.00? If so wouldnít that only apply if you made nothing over the years on your investment?

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Old 10-29-2017, 09:41 AM   #25
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Not quite sure I understand the math,...are you saying the 1% adds up to 25% over 20 years of your original investment? In other word 20 years ago you started with 100,000.00 after 20 years of 1% fees it has cost you 25,000.00? If so wouldnít that only apply if you made nothing over the years on your investment?



Dan


Yes but they take 1% of your assets so if you now have 250k because of interest etc they arenít still taking 1% of 100k. I think 1% for 20 years is 20%. Not sure were the other 5% comes from. On the other side of the coin if the person makes you a lot more than 1% in gains perhaps his 1% was well worth it.


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Old 10-29-2017, 09:49 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by ushaggerb View Post
Most of the major Fund owners now offer Target Retirement funds. Rebalances every year . All include index funds: U.S index, Global index, Bond indices, even cash for older folks. Could go to a financial planner but if they didnít recommend a Target Retirement fund, Iíd probably drop them. And why pay to get a reco for something Iím already doing? Rules of Thumb: know your investment horizon, everybody regresses to the mean, focus on the efficient frontier, the avoidance of management fees generally places you in the 68th-72nd percentile because you are buying the mean for less, buying individual stocks is gambling (refer to efficient frontier).



Best of luck!


Target date funds are great but they do have higher expense ratios usually than an index fund. Vanguard 500 .4 basis points or 4 cents for every hundred dollars for admiral shares compared to .16 or 16 cents for every 100 dollars. So while not a ton of money per say it still costs 4 times as much to own that fund over the other.


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Old 10-29-2017, 11:15 AM   #27
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Can anyone recommend a Financial Planner in the area?
Just an FYI... I currently use LPL Financial (Stephen Eldridge / Eric Putney). They currently fully manage my funds and have done very very well. I just looked at my statement and their advisory fee has an annual rate of .70%. Well worth it in my opinion....

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Old 10-29-2017, 04:36 PM   #28
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It is important to ask the question if the person charges for their time for providing advice or a fee on amount invested for service. Is s/he also doing investing for you. Fees add up over time.
Once, many years ago someone did the throwing darts at stock chart routine.
Actually did as well as financial planners. Go figure. It is a crap shoot. Something one can do themselves is invest in DRIPS directly from companies through a third party, usually a bank. Look up dividend stocks and check those paying dividends for 60 consecutive years. Over time the dividends add up substantially.
I did go this route until we decided to buy a car and I cashed out the stocks.
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Old 10-29-2017, 05:29 PM   #29
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Dan,

Good question, and in a way, you've caught me on the math. My previous posts were off the cuff and round numbers. Here's the real formula:

The future value (FV) of your portfolio is the present value (PV) times the quantity 1 plus the growth rate (r), raised to the power of the number of years (t). In other words--FV=PV(1+r)^t. The financial planner who charges 1% reduces r by .01.

So let's say a person who has $100,000 to invest expects to earn 6% per year. At the end of 20 years, he will have 100,000*1.06^20=$320,714. If that person hires a planner who charges 1%, at the end of 20 years he will have 100,000*1.05^20=265,330.

In this example, he's paid his planner $55,384. I leave it to each reader
to adjust the numbers for his own situation and to decide if a planner is worth the money. With an initial portfolio of $200,000, for example, planning fees would total $110,768.

A couple of important notes. First, the good news--these numbers are pretax, and you'll get a tax break on the planner's fees. Second, the bad news--the planner's fees are not the only fees to worry about. If the planner puts you into a high cost actively managed portfolio, you might be paying an additional 0.5-1% in fees on top of the planner's 1%, compared to a low cost index fund approach.

I do not write this to be critical of planners or to advise people on whether they should use one. I just hope folks will take advantage of free advice before deciding on whether they should hire a planner. Caveat emptor.
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Old 10-29-2017, 06:00 PM   #30
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Dan,

Good question, and in a way, you've caught me on the math. My previous posts were off the cuff and round numbers. Here's the real formula:

The future value (FV) of your portfolio is the present value (PV) times the quantity 1 plus the growth rate (r), raised to the power of the number of years (t). In other words--FV=PV(1+r)^t. The financial planner who charges 1% reduces r by .01.

So let's say a person who has $100,000 to invest expects to earn 6% per year. At the end of 20 years, he will have 100,000*1.06^20=$320,714. If that person hires a planner who charges 1%, at the end of 20 years he will have 100,000*1.05^20=265,330.

In this example, he's paid his planner $55,384. I leave it to each reader
to adjust the numbers for his own situation and to decide if a planner is worth the money. With an initial portfolio of $200,000, for example, planning fees would total $110,768.

A couple of important notes. First, the good news--these numbers are pretax, and you'll get a tax break on the planner's fees. Second, the bad news--the planner's fees are not the only fees to worry about. If the planner puts you into a high cost actively managed portfolio, you might be paying an additional 0.5-1% in fees on top of the planner's 1%, compared to a low cost index fund approach.

I do not write this to be critical of planners or to advise people on whether they should use one. I just hope folks will take advantage of free advice before deciding on whether they should hire a planner. Caveat emptor.
I totally agree with your numbers. However every individual needs to determine the "value" a planner brings in either additional returns or advice/counseling.

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Old 10-29-2017, 06:40 PM   #31
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I think Ishoot308 was the first poster to actually answer the question from pjard, and give a local name and recommendation. Well Done.

For those who love Vanguard, they have their place. But if I pay them 0.4% fee, every year or I buy an index ETF for a one time charge of $4.95 which is better? Take 10 years, $10,000 x 0.004 is $40 x 10=$400 management fee. The ETF cost me $4.95, once. If it's $1,000,000 that's $40,000 vs $4.95 over ten years.
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Old 10-29-2017, 07:39 PM   #32
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Scott Sullivan at Bay Point Financial. http://www.bayptfin.com or email Scott at bayptfin.com or his phone is on their site.

They have offices in Laconia and Bedford. I've worked with several brokers and firms over the years, some large, some small, was worried about being frugal, and then wished I had started with Scott earlier. He has a mix of managed products depending on your risk, experience, time horizon, etc.

I used to buy stocks and a mix of funds and sit on them for the long haul. I thought I was doing fine. I wasn't excited about paying for a managed account, but also know that I typically get what I pay for. There's a full team behind him actively allocating, buying, selling, rebalancing and managing the account. I was worried about fees and such, so I gave Scott a portion of my holdings for a year and he did significantly better than I would have. I gave him another chunk a year later and he did MUCH better than if I had stayed on my old approach.

Now he manages it all and we couldn't be happier.

I think it's worth your time to have an initial conversation and then decide if he may be right for you, too.
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Old 10-29-2017, 08:00 PM   #33
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Default Financial Focus, Wolfeboro

We like the concept of fee-only financial planning - i.e. professional advisers who charge for their time, with zero income from sales commissions. I'm not sure where the OP is located, but the web site for the National Association of Fee-Only Financial Planners has a "find a planner" tool on their web site:
www.napfa.org

If you're in the Wolfeboro area, we highly recommend Financial Focus on Mill Street. Their web site:
www.yourfinancialfocus.com
Our only connection with them has been a longstanding client relationship. They've done very well by us for 20+ years.
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Old 10-29-2017, 09:30 PM   #34
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I think Ishoot308 was the first poster to actually answer the question from pjard, and give a local name and recommendation. Well Done.

For those who love Vanguard, they have their place. But if I pay them 0.4% fee, every year or I buy an index ETF for a one time charge of $4.95 which is better? Take 10 years, $10,000 x 0.004 is $40 x 10=$400 management fee. The ETF cost me $4.95, once. If it's $1,000,000 that's $40,000 vs $4.95 over ten years.
Your numbers are off in two or three ways. First, the Vanguard expense ratio is more .04%, but this is fund-dependent. Second, the ETF expenses you quote are the transaction fees, which are zero for most mutual funds. Every ETF will also have an expense ratio similar to a mutual fund, say .04%. Third, the $4.95 does not include the bid-ask spread on the ETF. In other words, at any given moment, you need to pay more to buy shares than you would receive if you tried to sell them.

ETFs are good if you're interested in more trading flexibility than a mutual fund allows, but you pay for the privilege. Apples to apples, an ETF will always be more expensive than a similar mutual fund.
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Old 10-30-2017, 06:22 AM   #35
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Can anyone recommend a Financial Planner in the area?
Seems like most of the replies here have been focused solely on investment management. I recommended a fee only CFP because they provide far more than investment advice and for many people that is very important. Things such as tax planning, educational expense planning, insurance needs, estate planning, budgeting, etc. A good Planner becomes something of a life coach from a financial perspective, so you sure don't want that person to have any product ties based on commissions or their employer. Also you can't measure their worth solely on your portfolio's return. If they help you save more, earlier, those will drive your nest egg far more than any slight difference in fees. Again, check out www.lakesidefinancialplan.com to see what services a good holistic fee only CFP offers.

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Old 10-30-2017, 05:33 PM   #36
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My son has a financial planning business. He's based out of Windham, but is very capable of serving clients in the lakes region. He is a Certified Financial Planner which means he serves his clients in a fiduciary capacity, meaning he is required to put his clients' interests first. His only compensation is the fees he charges his clients, he never receives commissions based on products he recommends. Who ever you work with, I would insist they are a fiduciary and fee only based. His website is www.lakesidefinancialplan.com if you want to check him out.
I second Lakeside. Jared doing a great job for me. www.lakesidefinancialplan.com
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:53 PM   #37
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Default Educate yourself...

Don't hire a FP because you have no idea what your doing. Most mutual fund index funds beat most fund managers. It is important you educate yourself so you can communicate with the FP on a certain level that ensures your best interests. I subscriber to Bob Brinker's Marketimer and listen to his radio show on Sundays. Have followed his advice for years , as have many, many of my friends.
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:03 PM   #38
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Don't hire a FP because you have no idea what your doing. Most mutual fund index funds beat most fund managers. It is important you educate yourself so you can communicate with the FP on a certain level that ensures your best interests. I subscriber to Bob Brinker's Marketimer and listen to his radio show on Sundays. Have followed his advice for years , as have many, many of my friends.
I should have been a bit more specific in my original question. I am pretty financially savvy. Most of my $$$ outside of the 401(k) is with Fidelity. They are GREAT. However as the "wealth" accumulates I would simply like a second set of eyes to look at things. I want opinions of Whole Life Insurance, particularly 10 year pay....my own retirement projections....anything in my portfolio that scares them...etc, etc. It's the advice and counseling piece I am after more than mutual fund recommendations. I agree with everyone on this board, you can get some pretty good information from the mutual fund companies. I am a bit curious about one thing though, why has nobody mentioned DAK Financial in Meredith?
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:23 PM   #39
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I should have been a bit more specific in my original question. I am pretty financially savvy. Most of my $$$ outside of the 401(k) is with Fidelity. They are GREAT. However as the "wealth" accumulates I would simply like a second set of eyes to look at things. I want opinions of Whole Life Insurance, particularly 10 year pay....my own retirement projections....anything in my portfolio that scares them...etc, etc. It's the advice and counseling piece I am after more than mutual fund recommendations. I agree with everyone on this board, you can get some pretty good information from the mutual fund companies. I am a bit curious about one thing though, why has nobody mentioned DAK Financial in Meredith?
I know you didn't ask, but I cant quite help myself--Whole Life Insurance is among the worst investment vehicles a person can buy--it's simply adding a high cost/low return investment fund on top of term life insurance. The agent who sold it to you took a hefty commission. If you find a good financial planner, he'll explain the details, and he'll illustrate how you'd be better off buying term insurance and investing the difference alongside your existing Fidelity account. If the financial planner you find does not do this, he is either an insurance salesman or not very good at his job.
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Old 10-31-2017, 06:24 AM   #40
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I know you didn't ask, but I cant quite help myself--Whole Life Insurance is among the worst investment vehicles a person can buy--it's simply adding a high cost/low return investment fund on top of term life insurance. The agent who sold it to you took a hefty commission. If you find a good financial planner, he'll explain the details, and he'll illustrate how you'd be better off buying term insurance and investing the difference alongside your existing Fidelity account. If the financial planner you find does not do this, he is either an insurance salesman or not very good at his job.


Great advice by Peter G. Whole Life is possibly the worst investment you can make just below an annuity. High cost low rate of return equals a poor investment. Even universal life is an iffy investment at best. Just do a small comparison between your cash value in you whole policy and you mutual fund account and there will be a very stark difference.


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Old 10-31-2017, 07:32 AM   #41
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Most insurance products are bad investments vehicles. Usually the only people that make out in the deal are the people that sell them.
Buy Term Life only and invest your money elsewhere.
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Old 10-31-2017, 07:57 AM   #42
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Most insurance products are bad investments vehicles. Usually the only people that make out in the deal are the people that sell them.
Buy Term Life only and invest your money elsewhere.
We are all on the same page.
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Old 10-31-2017, 02:19 PM   #43
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Just an FYI... I currently use LPL Financial (Stephen Eldridge / Eric Putney). They currently fully manage my funds and have done very very well. I just looked at my statement and their advisory fee has an annual rate of .70%. Well worth it in my opinion....

Dan
I have LPL investments as well.
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Old 10-31-2017, 02:54 PM   #44
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I have LPL investments as well.
Eldridge??
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Old 11-03-2017, 02:08 PM   #45
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Eldridge??
I dont know who that is Dan.
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Old 11-08-2017, 05:16 PM   #46
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Default Use the tools at Fidelity

PeterG - great explanations! Everyone does have to decide what they want to pay... and I agree that anyone selling annuities or other insurance for investment will make more money than you will make. We use Fidelity and have for many years. They have super online tools and really well-versed people to talk with as well. I have my IRA in Fidelity spread out over about 30 mutual funds and several stocks. In the last year it has increased by about $12K. Of course, back in 2008/2009 it tanked as did most other investments. You really have to educate yourself on what you want to do, how much you want to fork over!
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Old 11-08-2017, 05:35 PM   #47
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I dont know who that is Dan.
http://www.eldridgeco.com/
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Old 11-08-2017, 10:22 PM   #48
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I've done very well with Fidelity,too, but I base a lot of my plans on Mornngstar's "Dividend Investor" newsletter. I do very little with mutual funds or fixed income. When I went through securities broker-dealer training 30 years ago, we all talked about 60% equities and 40% fixed income. These days, these ratios are just plain foolishness in my book when solid fixed income returns (gov's and CD's) are below 2%, many below 1%, and solid companies are paying 3% or better. (CTL pays 10%!)
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Old 11-11-2017, 06:13 PM   #49
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It's pretty funny how someone will ask a simple question on this forum and eighteen responses later the conversation will get so far off the tracks no one knows or remembers the original simple question, which reminds me... I like trains.
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Old 11-11-2017, 07:47 PM   #50
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You really really really have to view:

The Retirement Gamble.

LINK

Frontline.

Much more then retirement.

This one hour program/video is mandatory for all - young and old.
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Old 11-11-2017, 10:29 PM   #51
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Not interested i signing up for more newsletters, so I didn't give my info to the link.
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Old 11-12-2017, 09:01 AM   #52
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It's pretty funny how someone will ask a simple question on this forum and eighteen responses later the conversation will get so far off the tracks no one knows or remembers the original simple question, which reminds me... I like trains.
You should watch Trains and Locomotives on RFD-TV :-)

Available in HD now for all Directv subscribers.
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Old 11-12-2017, 11:13 AM   #53
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What is right for one person is not always right for another. Everyone has their own thoughts about the subject. You just have to take everything said on here with a grain of salt and do your own homework before handing your hard earned money over to anyone.
Just a quick story, I've been at my present business location for 9 years now. I have a customer/financial advisor that lived across the street in a newer town house from my shop. In those 9 years I've seen this guy go from making 7 figures, to getting divorced and spending 3 years in the Billerica house of correction, and now making 7 figures again. He just built a brand new home in Stoneham Ma., has a new trophy wife and drives a brand new $100K Mercedes AMG sedan.
I don't know how anyone would trust their money to this guy but he's a hell of a salesman.

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Old 11-14-2017, 05:04 PM   #54
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Let me put the train back on it's track...I can strongly recommend C H L and Associates in Rochester. John Lachapelle is awesome!

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