Go Back   Winnipesaukee Forum > Winnipesaukee Forums > General Discussion
Home Forums Gallery Blogs YouTube Channel Classifieds Links Calendar Register FAQDonate Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-19-2020, 07:38 AM   #1
hemlock
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 26 Times in 11 Posts
Default Lake childhood memories

I wonder if anyone would like to share their Lake childhood memories?

I remember being 5 years old (in 1963) and my grandfather and grandmother
took us tent camping at Camp Iroquois on the lake. My grandfather had built a kitchen box out of plywood that folded out and had a little coleman gas stove and all the cooking implements. If it rained they told us not to touch the canvas or the tent would leak.

The Camp Iroquois beach had a layer of clay under it if you dug down that you could make things out of.

One evening I saw a gas lantern on fire on the beach and I yelled out. Every one rushed over and threw sand on it and put it out. They said I saved the day!
I can remember feeling very proud.
hemlock is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to hemlock For This Useful Post:
coltgov101 (02-19-2020), TCC (02-19-2020), thinkxingu (02-20-2020), ursa minor (02-19-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 09:17 AM   #2
ishoot308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Gilford, NH / Welch Island
Posts: 4,539
Thanks: 1,648
Thanked 3,432 Times in 1,324 Posts
Default

There are so many but I guess most would be fishing with my father every weekend rain or shine and our yearly two week rental at the "Chanticleer" in Gilford. Special memories for sure!!

Dan
__________________
It's Always Sunny On Welch Island!!
ishoot308 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ishoot308 For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 12:11 PM   #3
Descant
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Merrimack and Welch Island
Posts: 1,990
Thanks: 610
Thanked 666 Times in 412 Posts
Default Living on the boat

My family had a 1950 Chris Craft Cruiser that we lived on, mostly weekends, home ported at Welch Island, but when it was too windy we hooked onto a mooring at Mark Island. In those days you could just install a mooring anyplace. We stayed overnight at the Weirs, Meredith, Center Harbor and Wolfeboro. My father loved to explore the lake. We rented an outboard from Goodhue Boat Yard to explore the Forties. $1/hr. We climbed Rattlesnake several times from different sides. Once, my mother nosed the cruiser up to the steep ledge facing the broads. Dad and I stepped off, and climbed while she circled below. There was a measured mile on that side of Rattlesnake island that was also marked on the charts. Prior to 1960, everything on Welch ran on propane. For running water, many had an elevated tank filled by a pump, and then gravity to the fixtures. The path around the perimeter of Welch Island went in front of all the camps and there was more interaction (and fewer camps) After 1960, the power line became the primary path, behind the camps, less random interaction, but island friends have unique relationships, particularly sharing DIY skills, tools and spare parts.
Descant is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Descant For This Useful Post:
Diana (02-19-2020), thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 12:14 PM   #4
upthesaukee
Senior Member
 
upthesaukee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Alton Bay
Posts: 4,882
Blog Entries: 2
Thanks: 1,588
Thanked 1,526 Times in 839 Posts
Default Several

I first came to the lake at Lake Shore Park, then my folks got a place in Two Pines Trailer Park in Glendale across from Lyon's Den (then Dorothy's). Swimming and diving off the docks. And I went to Camp Lawrence for four summers. Learned to swim (better), row, paddle, and sail; and catch snipe .
Being in and around the lake was a major part of my growing up.

Dave
__________________
I Live Here... I am always UPTHESAUKEE !!!!
upthesaukee is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to upthesaukee For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 12:19 PM   #5
dickiej
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Newburyport, MA
Posts: 132
Thanks: 6
Thanked 71 Times in 37 Posts
Default

.....rowing all the way from Peggy's Cove to the bandstand in Alton Bay....roller skating with Sandy from Sommerville.....first girl I ever kissed.
dickiej is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to dickiej For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Sponsored Links
Old 02-19-2020, 01:02 PM   #6
coltgov101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Nj now. Spindle point in the past.(35 yrs.)
Posts: 78
Thanks: 35
Thanked 9 Times in 3 Posts
Default Memories

As a youngster we used to swim down to the end of sachem cove. The water was deep and we were all proud that we were such good swimmers. One area was a little rocky and had water lilies all around. I remember these tiny little frogs that sat on the lilies, they were so small they used the lilies like life rafts. They were colored the exact same green as the water lilies and so tiny and fast they were absolutely fascinating. The lake was so pristine in those days the aquatic life was everywhere. Crayfish were everywhere, sometimes you had to be careful where you stepped! In the 1950's Winnie was so different than it is today.
coltgov101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2020, 04:18 PM   #7
Aunt Lula
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 16
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

We spent our summers on Loon Island on Lake Wentworth. Learned to swim at age 3-4. Spend endless hours with my sister catching crawfish and minnows. Swimming every day, rain or shine. Canoeing around the Seven Sisters and Stamp Act Islands. One summer our goal was to swim around Stamp Act Island which we did several times with an inner tube in case we got tired. I can still smell those big black inner tubes! Listening for the loons at night. Frequent trips into Wolfeboro for groceries and of course ice cream!
__________________
Aunt Lula is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Aunt Lula For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 05:12 PM   #8
Mr. V
Senior Member
 
Mr. V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: the left coast (Portland)and West Alton
Posts: 885
Thanks: 24
Thanked 110 Times in 78 Posts
Default

Spent a couple weeks every summer at our camp at Lake Shore Park.

Loved the sandy beach, and playing the juke box at the pavilion.

Disliked having to walk to the pavilion in the morning to fill a water jug from the old-timey pump to get our drinking water.

Hated going to the bathroon in the "pazoozie:" stand alone common toilets filled with spiders and peep holes in the walls.
__________________
basking in the benign indifference of the universe
Mr. V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2020, 06:39 PM   #9
Andromeda321
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 79
Thanks: 17
Thanked 28 Times in 18 Posts
Default

Franken Sundae where Town Docks is today with its make your own sundae bar. We went once a year and I loved that place so much I literally wrote my "how I spent my summer vacation" essay about it more than once.

We were on Blackeys Cove from when I was about 10, about a mile from Center Harbor, so it was a huge summer thing that I could bike into town! (Grew up in a nice corner of suburbia where you couldn't go anywhere sans car, so this was a special bit of freedom.) I would bike every morning to Robinson's General Store to buy a newspaper for my parents and a muffin for myself for breakfast. Reading the headlines about the Monica Lewinsky trial remain in my mind so I guess that tells people how old I am. Bayswatter Books also had a weekly "book club" Wednesday mornings in summer for kids, so we'd head over for that. No Internet at the lake, but you could reserve an hour of Internet on the days the Center Harbor library was open, so that was a lot of high school.

There was an awful noisy boat one year on Blackeys where the guy basically gutted the muffler and was noisy to annoy everyone, but was smart enough to only joyride a few minutes so he'd be off the lake by the time the Marine Patrol showed up. The day they finally caught him you could hear everyone cheering all around the cove. Solidarity!
Andromeda321 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Andromeda321 For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 08:26 PM   #10
thinkxingu
Senior Member
 
thinkxingu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,902
Thanks: 779
Thanked 832 Times in 498 Posts
Default

Define: timing.

My father is currently in ICU with failing health. He is not long for this world. Sometime last week, he had an unusually good evening, so I spent it picking his brain about the most important woman in my life, who passed away in 2014, less than one year after finally buying their summer camp. The story he told me changed how I will reflect upon Winnipesaukee for the rest of my life. Here goes: a Weirs Beach tale in two parts.

Part 1: My Youth
For most of my youth, my parents rented a home every summer on Baker Avenue in The Weirs. Though I was young—we stopped renting when I was around 10—I remember so many things about that time: the trading post with the giant Indian statue, where I would buy a bow with suction cup arrows; the arcade shooting game with the piano player and squawking bird; July 4th fireworks from the hotel porch in our pajamas; the crunchy donuts from the tiny convenience store under the pedestrian bridge; the roller rink upstairs; beeping to let other drivers we were driving over the bridge.

I could go on and on—amazing memories.

Part 2: My Father's Savior
I always knew my father's father was an abusive man. I remember once, while on our way to lunch, my pepe flicked his cigar out the window and the ash flew back in the back window, right into my brother's eye. After my brother began crying, Pepe turned around and told him to, "shut [his] god-damned mouth."

My father had 8 siblings, all of whom joined the circus or military or just moved far, far away. They were poor—my father didn't have hot water until he was 19—so there was nothing to keep them home.

As my father lay in his hospital bed, in tears borne of joyful memory, he told me how he met my mother while cruising around Lowell with a friend. After a few awful dates (another story, but in short: Dad was from the opposite side of the tracks), my mother and father began dating. Some months later, my mother's family was going away for a weekend at The Weirs and they invited my father. He was 19. It was his first weekend away from home.

My father credits that weekend in 1964—that's it, THAT weekend—with teaching him what a life should be: honest, kind, loving, sharing, sober. He told me about playing cards and laughing with my mother's family, cooking together, taking long walks, swimming—my father once almost drowned in a Lowell canal and hadn't gotten in the water since—in short, enjoying others' company rather than seeking every opportunity to escape.

As my father and I discussed the memories we each had—one of the beautiful things about a resort area that resists change is the ability for multiple generations to share the same experiences—I asked him where my mom's family had stayed that weekend he was "saved."

"Baker Avenue," he said. "I thought you knew?"

I discovered that night that the house that served as the backdrop of my young summers was the one in Dad's story of redemption all these years.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app
thinkxingu is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to thinkxingu For This Useful Post:
cominghome (03-03-2020), Descant (02-19-2020), Diana (02-19-2020), jbolty (02-19-2020), kawishiwi (02-19-2020), marinewife (02-23-2020), MeredithMan (02-20-2020), Moccasin (02-20-2020), Newbiesaukee (02-20-2020), Orion (02-26-2020), Senter Cove Guy (02-21-2020), upthesaukee (02-20-2020), ursa minor (02-19-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 08:46 PM   #11
ursa minor
Senior Member
 
ursa minor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Tuftonborough & Franklin MA
Posts: 240
Thanks: 78
Thanked 138 Times in 59 Posts
Default

Thinkxingu, so sorry to hear about the loss of your Mom and your Dad’s failing health. That said, I’m really happy you got the chance to have that conversation with him and be able to share in the great memories. Hoping for the best for your Dad and your family.
__________________
" Any day with a boat ride in it is a good day"
ursa minor is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ursa minor For This Useful Post:
thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-19-2020, 11:46 PM   #12
thinkxingu
Senior Member
 
thinkxingu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,902
Thanks: 779
Thanked 832 Times in 498 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ursa minor View Post
Thinkxingu, so sorry to hear about the loss of your Mom and your Dad’s failing health. That said, I’m really happy you got the chance to have that conversation with him and be able to share in the great memories. Hoping for the best for your Dad and your family.
Thanks, Ursa—I appreciate the sentiment.

Please, others, share your stories—I hope I didn't put a halt to the process, that wasn't my intention!

Sent from my SM-G950U using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app
thinkxingu is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 07:32 AM   #13
hemlock
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 26 Times in 11 Posts
Default Making a dugout canoe

In the fall of 1965 my grandfather bought a lot on Cow and the following spring built a tent platform a dock and what we called the sundeck. In the following years friends and relatives from our town also bought lots in the same
(Barber pole) section of Cow. One of them cut a big Pine at the water front and I got the idea to make a dugout canoe from it. The neighbors helped to roll it into the water and I used our old Arkansas Traveler with the 10 horse Johnson on it to tow it to our place. My Grandfather and I used a rope block and tackle to haul it on shore. Over the next two summers with my grandfather making cuts with the chainsaw and me using the ax and a borrowed adze we shaped it into a canoe.

Finally the moment of truth came when we pushed it into the water and climbed in with our paddles. It promptly rolled over and dumped us in the water!
We then nailed an outrigger with empty clorox bottles on the end and were able to go for a ride.
It was never the most stable or fast craft but I learned with that project that if you get an idea or a vision you carry it out with a lot of hard work and help from others.
hemlock is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to hemlock For This Useful Post:
Diana (02-20-2020), thinkxingu (02-20-2020), ursa minor (02-20-2020)
Old 02-20-2020, 08:38 AM   #14
ursa minor
Senior Member
 
ursa minor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Tuftonborough & Franklin MA
Posts: 240
Thanks: 78
Thanked 138 Times in 59 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemlock View Post
In the fall of 1965 my grandfather bought a lot on Cow and the following spring built a tent platform a dock and what we called the sundeck. In the following years friends and relatives from our town also bought lots in the same
(Barber pole) section of Cow. One of them cut a big Pine at the water front and I got the idea to make a dugout canoe from it. The neighbors helped to roll it into the water and I used our old Arkansas Traveler with the 10 horse Johnson on it to tow it to our place. My Grandfather and I used a rope block and tackle to haul it on shore. Over the next two summers with my grandfather making cuts with the chainsaw and me using the ax and a borrowed adze we shaped it into a canoe.

Finally the moment of truth came when we pushed it into the water and climbed in with our paddles. It promptly rolled over and dumped us in the water!
We then nailed an outrigger with empty clorox bottles on the end and were able to go for a ride.
It was never the most stable or fast craft but I learned with that project that if you get an idea or a vision you carry it out with a lot of hard work and help from others.
I may or may not have been one of the persons dumped into the water on the maiden voyage. I also remember doing a lot of fishing out of a very heavily built aluminum boat with a green 10 HP Johnson outboard. Blueberry pies made with island blueberries come to mind as well!
__________________
" Any day with a boat ride in it is a good day"
ursa minor is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ursa minor For This Useful Post:
KPW (02-20-2020), thinkxingu (02-20-2020)
Old 02-20-2020, 08:43 AM   #15
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,823
Thanks: 494
Thanked 857 Times in 603 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemlock View Post
In the fall of 1965 my grandfather bought a lot on Cow and the following spring built a tent platform a dock and what we called the sundeck. In the following years friends and relatives from our town also bought lots in the same
(Barber pole) section of Cow. One of them cut a big Pine at the water front and I got the idea to make a dugout canoe from it. The neighbors helped to roll it into the water and I used our old Arkansas Traveler with the 10 horse Johnson on it to tow it to our place. My Grandfather and I used a rope block and tackle to haul it on shore. Over the next two summers with my grandfather making cuts with the chainsaw and me using the ax and a borrowed adze we shaped it into a canoe.

Finally the moment of truth came when we pushed it into the water and climbed in with our paddles. It promptly rolled over and dumped us in the water!
We then nailed an outrigger with empty clorox bottles on the end and were able to go for a ride.
It was never the most stable or fast craft but I learned with that project that if you get an idea or a vision you carry it out with a lot of hard work and help from others.
How many lots were occupied in that area of Cow at that time? I am thinking that might be 10 years after the first lot was sold there??
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 08:51 AM   #16
ursa minor
Senior Member
 
ursa minor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Tuftonborough & Franklin MA
Posts: 240
Thanks: 78
Thanked 138 Times in 59 Posts
Default

Since I've mostly blown my cover I might as well continue. My parents bought land on Cow Island in the fall of 1967. The real estate agent had a big wooden cabin cruiser so getting out to see the lot to buy it, no problem.

After buying the lot, we needed a boat. Full disclosure, my dad had never owned much less driven a boat but island property so boat. I remember touring a bunch of boat yards and we ended up at the old Lakeport Landing, I believe the owner at the time was named Jerry Hebert. My dad ended up buying a 16 foot Grady White Pamlico (are you reading Dave R? ) with a 50 HP black and white Mercury outboard so the boat and motor were probably 1960-62 vintage. It was blue with a white stripe at the top strake, copper bottom paint and bright mahogany decks, windshield, seats and transom. (I thought it was AWESOME!)

We ended up taking the boat for a test ride (I got to go) and being a wooden boat, there was some water in it. Jerry told my dad to drive straight and went back to pull the plug. At some point the boat started to speed up a little and I vividly remember seeing water below my feet and Jerry telling my dad to slow it back down. I'm probably 5 or so at this point and I have to say it's one of my more vivid early memories.

There's a prequel to what led up to my parents buying on Cow but I'm going to let some others have their memory moment now. Thanks Hemlock, great thread!
__________________
" Any day with a boat ride in it is a good day"
ursa minor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 10:25 AM   #17
KPW
Senior Member
 
KPW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 336
Thanks: 624
Thanked 96 Times in 44 Posts
Default

I have five siblings. My grandparents would take us up 3 at a time. The "beach wagon" would be packed on Thursday night. My grandfather would pick us up at school so we didn't have to wait for the bus. We would head to the lake. We always looked for the tepee and the totem pole on the hill in Hooksett. We would never stop on the way. My grandmother always said, every stop is 20 minutes less time on the island. We all wanted to be the 1st one in Wolfeboro and would stick our foot as far forward as we could when we passed the Wolfeboro sign.

I remember picking blueberries with one of the neighbors. We did not have an oven. We brought the blueberries to my neighbors house and her grandmother made the best blueberry muffins I ever had.

We stayed in an old WWII kitchen army tent for the first few years. I used to think the patches on the tent were from bullet holes. After my grandfather passed, the neighbors decided they did not want to keep putting up the old tent. They made arrangements and got all the wood over to the island to surprise my grandmother with a new cabin. On the way over in the boat, I asked my grandmother what she liked better, a tent or a cabin. She said she preferred a tent. All the neighbors got together and built the cabin in a weekend. My grandmother was a daughter of the prohibition and did not allow alcohol at the camp. Years later, when we replaced the roof, we found NO BEER NO WORK written in big black letters on the roof.

My grandmother was famous for her sour milk donuts. We had some new neighbors that were camping in a small tent. It was pouring rain. She brought them fresh warm donuts and a pot of hot coffee. They will never forget that. One of our favorite dinners was simply spagettios and scrambled hamburger. We always had to wait a hour after lunch to go swimming.

My grandmother instilled the love of the island in me. The time I spent with her on the island was precious. To this day, there is no place on earth that I would rather be.
KPW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 11:29 AM   #18
Janet
Senior Member
 
Janet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 386
Thanks: 138
Thanked 87 Times in 60 Posts
Default

From the time I was 4 years old and up through high school my family would travel from New Jersey to our rental on Pinnacle Park Road in Meredith for the month of August. Every morning we'd drive to Prescott Pharmacy in downtown Meredith to pick up the daily newspaper and treats for the day. My aunt and uncle owned a cottage just up the hill from our rental on Pinnacle Park so many days we'd swim and spend our day with our cousins. No power boat back then, just a very heavy rowboat. During those times we had the Key Theater, Samaha clothing store, Prescott Pharmacy and the A&P all in downtown Meredith. True's gift shop was on the corner of Rt 25 and Rt 3. The mill across the street was still a mill and not the shops that are there now. We also had Interlakes Dairy Bar where we'd go for their "Sissy Splits" and the deli where the Meredith Bank now sits had the best grinders. Sunday night we'd all go down to the Weirs for caramel popcorn and fireworks. We kids would always get excited waiting for the firework that contained a parachute that all the boats would try to catch. Loving the lakes region as much as we always have, my sister and her husband now rent in the Melvin Village area for the whole family to visit and enjoy. Lake Winni, Meredith, the Weirs and surrounding towns will always hold a special place in our hearts.

Last edited by Janet; 02-20-2020 at 02:21 PM.
Janet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 12:06 PM   #19
hemlock
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 26 Times in 11 Posts
Default occupied lots

Quote:
Originally Posted by tis View Post
How many lots were occupied in that area of Cow at that time? I am thinking that might be 10 years after the first lot was sold there??
These lots were sold by an outfit called Island Sales Corporation. The bulk of the lots on this non Idlewild side of Cow were sold by them. My grandfathers lot was one of two sold on Oct 14 1965. The other one was sold to the TV repair man who told my grandfather about the Island. To my knowledge they were the first.

There may have been other lots on that side of Cow owned or sold by others but that is what I know.
The plan of the lots is located in the Carroll County Registry of deeds as Plan book 7 Page 68.
hemlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 01:09 PM   #20
tis
Senior Member
 
tis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,823
Thanks: 494
Thanked 857 Times in 603 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemlock View Post
These lots were sold by an outfit called Island Sales Corporation. The bulk of the lots on this non Idlewild side of Cow were sold by them. My grandfathers lot was one of two sold on Oct 14 1965. The other one was sold to the TV repair man who told my grandfather about the Island. To my knowledge they were the first.

There may have been other lots on that side of Cow owned or sold by others but that is what I know.
The plan of the lots is located in the Carroll County Registry of deeds as Plan book 7 Page 68.
I am interested because a friend of the family supposedly bought the first lot on the Barber Pole side which you are talking about. He went out a few times in his little boat and camped out but then he was killed in an auto accident so he didn't own it very long. Other friends of ours had the little brown camp opposite Cow on Tuftonboro Neck and he put his little boat in there so he didn't have very far to go. I am pretty vague because I was so young. I just would love to piece it all together sometime. I don't know if this was before or during the Island Sales Corp. that you mentioned. I think his name was Barker.
tis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 04:14 PM   #21
Barney Bear
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 784
Thanks: 394
Thanked 214 Times in 136 Posts
Default Oscar Winners?

We have enjoyed many memorable experiences since buying our place on East Bear Island in 1967 [before we bought our first house].

One summer, we had twenty people and five dogs visiting at the same time as they all wanted to be there together. Fortunately, we had installed a new state-of-the-art septic system a few years before.

Of special note, our oldest grandniece produced movies, as a school project, while there using our family and guests as cast members. Our biggest production was "Gilligan's Island". Of course, I was the Captain. Our Scottish terriers appeared in roasting pots. Vacationers aboard the Sophie C were treated to a noisy greeting from the shore castaways' encampment as they passed by.

We are still waiting for our Oscar statuettes to be delivered. 🎭 🐻
Barney Bear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 05:37 PM   #22
JEEPONLY
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 279
Thanks: 85
Thanked 51 Times in 37 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barney Bear View Post
We have enjoyed many memorable experiences since buying our place on East Bear Island in 1967 [before we bought our first house].

One summer, we had twenty people and five dogs visiting at the same time as they all wanted to be there together. Fortunately, we had installed a new state-of-the-art septic system a few years before.

Of special note, our oldest grandniece produced movies, as a school project, while there using our family and guests as cast members. Our biggest production was "Gilligan's Island". Of course, I was the Captain. Our Scottish terriers appeared in roasting pots. Vacationers aboard the Sophie C were treated to a noisy greeting from the shore castaways' encampment as they passed by.

We are still waiting for our Oscar statuettes to be delivered. 🎭 🐻
Great story!
I hope you get the chocolate/gold covered statuette(s)! It sounds like you expect to win in more than one category!

What was the year your grandniece filmed her movie? Was she a high school student (I'm thinking what type of medium)? Even very young students, today, can do amazing things with video!
JEEPONLY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 06:03 PM   #23
8gv
Senior Member
 
8gv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,233
Thanks: 28
Thanked 379 Times in 236 Posts
Default

I can barely remember this and a few details were filled in much later by my now deceased mother.

After finishing third grade I was told that our family was going to Mt Washington and Lake Winnipesaukee for a week that summer.

I had a 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle of a beautiful snow capped mountain reflecting in a small pond.

Somehow this became my expectation for our vacation.

We arrived after dark at a small rental cabin above the Weirs.

In the morning I got my first glimpse of the lake.

It looked very different than my puzzle!

We headed up to the Mt Washington cog railway for a ride to the summit that terrified my mom.

Upon our return to our cabin my mom declared that her tooth hurt really bad.

Apparently it was abscessed and for some reason a dentist was not consulted.

Then it started raining, a lot, so we went home the next day.

Fortunately, on the advice of an employee, my wife and I gave the area another try in 2003.

We now live here full time!
8gv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 06:04 PM   #24
Barney Bear
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 784
Thanks: 394
Thanked 214 Times in 136 Posts
Default Hollywood East

Our grandniece was in college in the mid-west. I believe that our summers of stardom were in the early 21st Century. She used a video camera, and gave the actors copies on CD's. What a fun time we all had!!! 🐻
Barney Bear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2020, 06:50 PM   #25
MeredithMan
Senior Member
 
MeredithMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Bedford, NH; Meredith, NH
Posts: 455
Thanks: 140
Thanked 430 Times in 152 Posts
Default

The Lake has been an important part of my family's life, and it all began on Labor Day Weekend, 1973. We went away for the weekend and ended up at The MaryKay Cottage on the shores of LSP. I was just a 12 year old boy at the time, but it is probably one of the best childhood memories I have...playing ball in the water with my parents, a folk mass on Saturday evening in The Pavillion, and some older gent at the cottage next to The MaryKay who talked my father's ear off and began every sentence with, "Well anywho...."

The MaryKay was for sale at the time, I believe for $5,000.00. My parents were very tempted, but as I remember, you could only buy the cottage and not the land....not sure if that is accurate or not, but that is what I remember my parents saying. As a result, they didn't buy it, but eventually did find a place that brought them great joy the rest of their lives.

Now, as an adult with my own kids, the lake is our home-away-from-home and we owe it all to that weekend at LSP and the MaryKay cottage.
MeredithMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2020, 06:53 AM   #26
hemlock
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 26 Times in 11 Posts
Default Sailing

There was all kinds of fun to be had when we were kids on Cow. To start with exploring and building forts. The 1938 hurricane had knocked down many large pines on the Island that were never salvaged. We used to make leantos beside them. We used to walk along the electric lines and pick up short pieces of wire
nuts bolts and screws that the linemen had dropped.

When we were old enough to use the boat on our own we would go to Orchard cove and pull up at the isthmus and walk to the other side to swim and dive. Sometimes we would anchor there and dive for mussels on the sandy bottom.

I remember people saying the Mt Washington sheltered in Orchard cove during the 1938 Hurricane.

We once rigged up a mast on the old Arkansas Traveler aluminum boat with a
mast and went sailing. It went so slow we wrote letters on the sail saying "The Turtle"
hemlock is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to hemlock For This Useful Post:
KPW (02-24-2020)
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

This page was generated in 0.31971 seconds