PDA

View Full Version : Reopening Update


gravy boat
05-01-2020, 02:31 PM
From NHBR and Union Leader

CONCORD — Requiring hairstylists and their customers to wear masks, quarantining clothes after they’re tried on and maintaining existing precautions are expected in the plan Gov. Chris Sununu will present Friday to reopen the state’s businesses in stages while extending the stay-at-home order.
Sununu reviewed guidelines for reopening a broad range of businesses, including restaurants, retail stores, state parks, golf courses, campgrounds and hair salons as he put the finishing touches on the “flex open” plan.
With the changes, Sununu is expected to extend the stay-at-home order set to expire May 4.
The Governor’s Reopening Task Force late Thursday completed more than 12 hours of drafting, discussing and adopting proposals for specific industries.
They also adopted universal guidelines for all New Hampshire employers and employees to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Businesses will be urged to let employees continue to work from home as much as practical, to screen them before they enter the workplace and to have them wear face coverings “while at work and in public.”
D.J. Bettencourt, Sununu’s policy director, said Friday’s announcement will not include a date for reopening Seacoast and state park beaches.
“This is going to be the subject of long-term discussion,” he said.
“Inevitably whatever we do, we will not make 100% of the folks in our state happy, but what we are trying to do is strike the right balance so our citizens are healthy and safe and we are getting our economy moving again,” Bettencourt said.
State Rep. Jeff Salloway, D-Lee, said the task force’s next job will be to create standards to react quickly to a resurgence of the virus.
“We are dealing with wave one of this outbreak,” Salloway said. “There is likely to be a wave two and we face the possibility next fall of a wave three. ”
Haircuts head to top
During two hours of public comment Thursday, licensed cosmetologists dominated the discussion. Most urged Sununu to go beyond the task force’s recommendation to restrict salons to haircuts and routine dying of hair roots.
Janelle Burris, who runs Janelle’s Modern Beauty Salon in Concord, said 75% of her business is custom hair and other treatments such as waxing.
“I feel like those restrictions are only going to benefit big corporate places like Supercuts. It makes me afraid small businesses like myself won’t be able to open back up,” Burris said.
But a commenter named Jenny, who runs a salon out of the bottom floor of her home, said she is worried about opening now.
“I don’t feel salons have to be part of phase one. I have tried to get sanitation materials and not had much success,” Jenny said.
Under the task force’s recommendation, waxing, nail work and tanning would not be permitted.
“It is better we start small and let’s see how it works. We felt like this was a good place to start,” said state Sen. Sharon Carson, R-Londonderry, who led the group working on that sector.
Salon seating would be limited to maintain social distancing, and both the hairstylist and the customer must wear face coverings.
Greg Stone urged Sununu to reopen as much of the economy as possible and balance public health with business health.
“You seem to say nothing is as important as saving lives,” Stone said, addressing the governor with his remarks. “I believe saving our residents and businesses’ economic lives are paramount. I believe they are entwined.
“If our economy is not open very soon, we will face economic and employment challenges the likes of which we have not seen.”
Restaurants and hotels
The guidelines call for restaurants to expand from delivery and curbside pickup in four steps.
The first phase would allow sit-down dining on existing patios, sidewalks or parking spaces close to the business where it can be done safely. Tables of up to six patrons would be permitted.
The second phase would allow inside dining of groups up to 10 people at tables at least six feet apart.
Customers in bars would be spaced at least six feet apart. Catering would be open for parties up to 50 with tables of 10.
At the time of the second phase, hotels could open to the public. Pools and exercise gyms in hotels would be closed, and no congregating would be allowed in the lobby.
The third phase would permit restaurant dining of larger groups. Hotel pools and gyms could reopen with enhanced cleaning, and groups of up to 10 would be allowed in lobbies.
The fourth phase would bring hotel and restaurant practices near to normal with enhanced cleaning and training for staff still in place.
Retail trade
Curbside and delivery of products would remain an option and would be encouraged for “vulnerable populations” reluctant to enter a store to shop.
Owners would be encouraged to set aside special hours for at-risk people to shop.
Reopened stores will have one-way aisles “if possible” and customers would stay six feet apart at the checkout.
All clothing tried on by customers would be put in quarantine for 48 hours before being returned to the sales floor.
Cashiers must wear masks, and plastic dividers would be installed between cashiers and the public where feasible.
State parks and beaches
The Flume in Franconia Notch would be fully open first for online advance ticketing only, with groups of up to six at one time.
Food and beverage sales would be limited to grab-and-go and outdoor seating.
Initially, inland beaches at state parks would be open only for campers, with day users allowed later, said Parks Director Phil Bryce.
Each beach’s capacity would be determined and enforced to ensure social distancing, he said.
State park officials are studying a second, future option at ocean beaches to allow “restricted sitting” on the sand but Bryce said it’s a work in progress.
“We are looking at specific locations or how to figure out reserve spots on the beach so umbrellas aren’t touching each other. There is a lot of details to see whether this is possible,” Bryce said.
“The Seacoast is so complex and it is such an at risk environment that we want to be careful to make sure phase one goes well before moving on.”
Campgrounds
The recommendations call for restrooms to be used by one person at a time.
Private campgrounds could open up rest rooms to wider use if social distancing were possible.
Campers could not have visitors.
Task force members persuaded Bryce to permit shower and laundry services at campgrounds as long as sanitation meets state and federal regulations.
Tent use could be at 50% of campground capacity.
Rep. Ed Butler, D-Hart’s Location, said he supported it.
“I think the issue of having a phase in which we open to a lesser extent is a reassurance for our general population that we are taking steps in the right direction but not open up quickly to everything,” Butler said.
Bryce had proposed RV sites have one open space between them, but the task force changed that to allow all RV spots to be occupied as long as campers practice social distancing.
Sen. Robert Giuda, R-Warren, lobbied for getting rid of having to space RV’s.
“I can be in an RV three feet away from another and I am still six feet away from everybody with two walls in between. The virus doesn’t go through walls,” Giuda said.
“This type of broad brush rule I find counterproductive to getting businesses and reopened and profitable again.”
Golf courses
During the first phase, tee times would be 12 minutes apart to maintain social distancing.
Golfers would bring their own equipment. Clubhouses and locker rooms would be closed except for golfers to use the restroom.
A beer cart could make sales along the course as long as the staffer wore personal protection.
The flag at each hole would be altered so hitting the stick would complete scoring and golfers wouldn’t have to reach into the cup.
In the second phase, pro shops would reopen.
A “halfway house” could open at the midpoint of the course to allow limited food and drink to be picked up, but seating or service would not be available.
The flags would be placed into the hole as normal in this phase, and tee times would be reduced to 10 minutes apart.
Golf instruction and some youth golf activity could open with social distancing.
The third phase would remove many of the restrictions, but in all phases, players would remain in their cars until 15 minutes before teeing off.
The clubhouse could open for groups of not more than 10 and tee times would be eight minutes apart.

gravy boat
05-01-2020, 03:09 PM
https://www.governor.nh.gov/news-media/press-2020/20200501-stay-at-home.htm

From today.

Sue Doe-Nym
05-01-2020, 03:32 PM
Seeing as we are desperate for a local motel from May 14th on, is there anything about that? Something for someone whose house is unlivable?
Thanks.

GodSmile
05-01-2020, 04:15 PM
Quick read... guidance appears to be silent on Boat Yards/Marinas.

Slickcraft
05-01-2020, 04:34 PM
Seeing as we are desperate for a local motel from May 14th on, is there anything about that? Something for someone whose house is unlivable?
Thanks.

No mention of motels. Also, as already noted, no mention of marinas. Retail stores can open May 11 with restrictions.

WinnisquamZ
05-01-2020, 04:49 PM
Believe marinas are open. If not, it’s by choice


Sent from my iPhone using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=92687)

Rich
05-01-2020, 04:55 PM
No mention of motels. Also, as already noted, no mention of marinas. Retail stores can open May 11 with restrictions.

I listened to the press conference.

Stay at home until May 31.

Others mentioned about limited business openings, etc.

There was no mention of hotels, boating or marinas. I'm guessing possibly because boating doesn't usually start up until about Memorial day?

With this being said, they did say some interesting things about camps which can be open now:


Only NH residents
Only Members (if private)
No club houses open
No congregating in groups
Maintain social distancing
Cloth face masks when out


Full campground guidance is here:
https://www.governor.nh.gov/news-media/stay-at-home/documents/20200105-campgrounds.pdf

Since some marinas are like a campground, but with people sleeping on their boat instead of a tent/cabin, perhaps those are good guidelines to start with?

I see some private marina's are doing this, and even saying members only and no guests or visitors (only your 'same household' family members are allowed at the marina). Some are closed completely, and yet other's seem to be ignoring and doing nothing?

What do you think marina's should do?

Merrymeeting
05-01-2020, 05:01 PM
Something for someone whose house is unlivable?

Sue, at some point are you willing to share what happened? But I suggest you only need do so if it will help others avoid a similar situation.

GodSmile
05-01-2020, 05:34 PM
I can tell you Fay's has technically been closed to the public. I think the exception is if you boat from there to a residence at an island. They have asked me not to enter the property to access my boat, which has been in the water for several weeks.

Sue Doe-Nym
05-01-2020, 05:59 PM
Sue, at some point are you willing to share what happened? But I suggest you only need do so if it will help others avoid a similar situation.

I would be happy to share our tale of woe so that others can avoid the same plight. However, I just received a very generous offer via PM that I need to respond to properly since my first attempt fizzled. In our case, since our house is uninhabitable, the Center Harbor Inn is going to allow us to stay there because our case is considered “essential” and was arranged through our insurance company. We just found this out, and you can’t imagine our relief....there are worse fates than being marooned in Florida, but we have a ton of stuff to attend to up north, and we want to oversee the progress. I’ll address our ongoing saga in a separate message. In the meantime, I want to express our gratitude to one of the generous forum members for reaching out to us....we are very touched by that.

Mr. V
05-01-2020, 07:04 PM
Seeing as we are desperate for a local motel from May 14th on, is there anything about that? Something for someone whose house is unlivable?
Thanks.

What about a vacation rental through one of the online sites, or even airbnb?

webmaster
05-07-2020, 06:53 AM
The mattress discussion has been moved here:

https://www.winnipesaukee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25725

Chris M
05-07-2020, 07:37 PM
These politicians who think they're capable of centrally planning complex things like this are a joke, and regular folks pay the price.

This isn't Europe or China where this crap is acceptable. This is America, where freedom isn't supposed to take a back seat. Disgusting.

Mr. V
05-07-2020, 08:54 PM
These politicians who think they're capable of centrally planning complex things like this are a joke, and regular folks pay the price.

This isn't Europe or China where this crap is acceptable. This is America, where freedom isn't supposed to take a back seat. Disgusting.


Were this a truly existential virus such as Ebola: would you still have the same attitude?

If not, where should we draw the line?

Chris M
05-08-2020, 08:16 PM
Were this a truly existential virus such as Ebola: would you still have the same attitude?

If not, where should we draw the line? There have been lots of viruses and diseases throughout time. Is this so much the worst requiring a completely new paradigm? Hundreds of thousands die each year from the effects of smoking, and cigarettes aren't even banned.

Aids, SARS, H1N1, malaria, etc, etc, etc... and we have this one. It's on you to articulate why this particular one warrants the unprecedented approach where it's now proper to sacrifice basic freedoms.

searay
05-08-2020, 11:21 PM
Would agree. These politicians need to realize that we can still live and survive without the interference. If we follow the CDC guidelines we should be able to stop the spread and still have some social life.

Mr. V
05-09-2020, 12:22 PM
It's on you to articulate why this particular one warrants the unprecedented approach where it's now proper to sacrifice basic freedoms.

Please keep in mind that it's not just "us" that are in lockdown mode: most of the world is / was as well.

Had we not adopted the measures we did the death rate would have been much higher: when we saw it explode in Italy, for example, it ramped up the fear level.

The problem with how we handled it is that there was never a coordinated dialogue among the politicians as to the bottom line issue, namely: how many American lives are we willing to lose in order to save the economy: nobody ever took a vote.

Earlier projections of the death rate, had we done nothing, exceeded one million IIRC: clearly unacceptable.

But 80K deaths: arguably tolerable, given the historic death rate by flu.

There should be a consensus on acceptable death rate, and their isn't.

One other factor that led to draconian steps was the totally helpless feeling caused by lack of a vaccine.

Chris M
05-11-2020, 08:00 AM
Please keep in mind that it's not just "us" that are in lockdown mode: most of the world is / was as well.

Had we not adopted the measures we did the death rate would have been much higher: when we saw it explode in Italy, for example, it ramped up the fear level.

The problem with how we handled it is that there was never a coordinated dialogue among the politicians as to the bottom line issue, namely: how many American lives are we willing to lose in order to save the economy: nobody ever took a vote.

Earlier projections of the death rate, had we done nothing, exceeded one million IIRC: clearly unacceptable.

But 80K deaths: arguably tolerable, given the historic death rate by flu.

There should be a consensus on acceptable death rate, and their isn't.

One other factor that led to draconian steps was the totally helpless feeling caused by lack of a vaccine.
That's all reasonable.

It's as though nobody is willing to talk about the acceptable death rate. As it stands now it's as though 1 is too many and anyone saying otherwise doesn't care about human life. And they talk as though there's very little cost to keeping things locked down, and very little benefit to reversing course and getting back to life.

The status quo is a very immature way to handle a complex social situation such as this. It used to be Americans would rise in the face of adversity, but holy crap this is not the America I grew up in.

Biggd
05-11-2020, 08:55 AM
That's all reasonable.

It's as though nobody is willing to talk about the acceptable death rate. As it stands now it's as though 1 is too many and anyone saying otherwise doesn't care about human life. And they talk as though there's very little cost to keeping things locked down, and very little benefit to reversing course and getting back to life.

The status quo is a very immature way to handle a complex social situation such as this. It used to be Americans would rise in the face of adversity, but holy crap this is not the America I grew up in.We could also argue "acceptable economic loss", also a complex social situation which is different for everyone.
"Acceptable death rate" is a moving target. No one is going to agree on an "acceptable death rate because everyone's situation is different.
The government has to make that call and we all have to live with the results. It's just like going into a war, how many lives are we willing to lose to achieve an acceptable outcome?

ishoot308
05-11-2020, 09:05 AM
Interesting....the government “accepts” 80,000 deaths per year due to alcohol. I don’t see any of the liquor stores closing any time soon. Quite the contrary, they are named “essential” services and new ones are being built every day! Heck a new one will be going up Soon at Exit 18!

In San Francisco they have allowed the homeless alcoholics and drug addicts to takeover hotels and motels and they are actually having methadone, booze and weed delivered to them at no charge! What great world we live in huh?

https://www.foxnews.com/us/san-francisco-homeless-addicts-in-hotels-coronavirus-debate

Dan