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Old 06-01-2012, 07:26 AM   #1
rgilfert
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Default Dock Lines

Try as I may........I just can't learn to splice a loop into a three strand nylon line.

Currently when I tie my boat up at our cottage I use the lines that are permanently attached to the cleats on my boat (i.e. the ropes that I use to tie up when I'm away from home). These lines are long enough (15') to enable tying up at piers with large pilings (e.g. the Meredith Town Docks). Consequently, tying up at home takes a longer amount of time than should be necessary due to the need to "custom" tie up (aligning with boat whips, etc) each and every time that I dock at home. What I would like is to have custom fit lines permanently attached to the cleats on my dock so that I simply need to slip them over the boat cleats when I arrive back at home. Does anyone know where I could get custom length lines created with loops spliced on both ends?
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Old 06-01-2012, 07:50 AM   #2
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Default Have knots, will travel...

RG:

Real sailors don't buy pre made lines. We make " Em.

Give me a call 455 7178 and we'll make a plan for a marlinspike seamanship lesson. Town docks,or my place?

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Old 06-01-2012, 09:07 AM   #3
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Long ago I learned to make splice loops and made a few way back when. While spliced loops look real nice, I gave that up and now simply tie a bowline loop which is quite functional.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:08 AM   #4
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Default That's really nice of you!

What a nice thing to offer! When someday we can afford to buy a boat I hope there will still be people around to offer help like this so we won't be the "yahoos" that some on here complain about.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:43 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Slickcraft View Post
Long ago I learned to make splice loops and made a few way back when. While spliced loops look real nice, I gave that up and now simply tie a bowline loop which is quite functional.
The above is what I do. I also have permanent docklines on the dock already adjusted to the ideal length with a bowline at the boat end to drop over, OR.. through and back over a cleat. I carry a seperate set of docklines on the boat for "Away" docking. NB
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:44 AM   #6
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Knotical Marine Lines,LLC is a locally owned company that can take care of your needs. They use top grade three strand nylon.

They supply many of the marinas and dock companies in the area as well as supplying them with custom work.

Dave Putnam is one of the key partners and has been referred to by forum members as creating a top quality product.

Their website is:
http://knoticalmarinelines.com/

You can call them at (603) 387-9279 (From their website)

Email is: knoticalmarinelines@comcast.net
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:08 AM   #7
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The above is what I do. I also have permanent docklines on the dock already adjusted to the ideal length with a bowline at the boat end to drop over, OR.. through and back over a cleat. I carry a seperate set of docklines on the boat for "Away" docking. NB
this is what I do, leave pre set lines on the dock cleats and through the eye through the middle of the boat cleats and around the tips, in and out from the dock in seconds, then just have an extra set of lines on the boat for away docking to tie up when on the water plus then the lines are not strewn all around the boat while underway and looks neater to
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:29 AM   #8
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this is what I do, leave pre set lines on the dock cleats and through the eye through the middle of the boat cleats and around the tips, in and out from the dock in seconds, then just have an extra set of lines on the boat for away docking to tie up when on the water plus then the lines are not strewn all around the boat while underway and looks neater to
Yep I do the same thing....

However learning to splice 3 stranded line is never a bad thing. I learned many years ago from my Uncle... And once you learn you never forget.
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Old 06-01-2012, 12:18 PM   #9
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Default Learn right here

Here is a great animated eye loop slicing tutorial.

http://www.animatedknots.com/splice/index.php
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:04 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by NoBozo View Post
The above is what I do. I also have permanent docklines on the dock already adjusted to the ideal length with a bowline at the boat end to drop over, OR.. through and back over a cleat. I carry a seperate set of docklines on the boat for "Away" docking. NB
Perfect procedure!
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:19 PM   #11
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Here is a great animated eye loop slicing tutorial.

http://www.animatedknots.com/splice/index.php
What a great animation; there are a few variations I could do. One strand could have two added tucks, and another have one added tuck from the third, which stays at three tucks from the first. This makes a sort of tapered change of thickness.

Having grown up on New England coast with sailing lessons, once learned one does not forget. Several times for a summer lake person a friend eye spliced in both ends of the 4 lines to attach to dock as previous post writes. End result is the splicing was not appreciated. When we browse the Antique Classic Boat shows, at Meredith Town Docks in late July, it is really amusing how the owners of many such elegant craft can be so clueless about knots and splicing. The reason for the knots is basically ease of attaching and leaving a dock, especially if one is hurried. Wrapping lines round and round and round the post is very inefficient.

If I can create some free time, one could PM and I'd get in touch with my friend to do some splicing. A few marinas might possibly have a rigger on staff who could do some splicing and/or suggestions ~ I say possibly!

Copy the animation and keep it on one's own computer device, is best option!
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:16 PM   #12
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If you can't tie a knot, then tie a lot
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:49 PM   #13
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Default Where's Granny?

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If you can't tie a knot, then tie a lot
When all else fails there's nothing like the old "multiple Granny Knot"!!
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Old 06-01-2012, 04:26 PM   #14
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Default "AWAY" Dock lines

I have a 20' (2700#) Donzi runabout. My Away dock lines are 3/8 inch Three Strand (twisted) Nylon with a bowline loop at ONE end. The bowline will go on a cleat on the boat. The other (plain) end will go on the dock..no matter how the dock is arranged. Each dock line is 26 feet long overall...with the Bowline already tied in. I have TWO away docklines. They are of such length that the Tail (leftover) end can be used as a spring...back to the boat...on rare occasions.

Everybody who has this type of boat....including the Antique Chris Crafts, has a Lifting Ring on the bow and stern. These people have a permanent dock line attached to this lifting ring....leading back to the cockpit when underway. I don't use these for tying up.

My boat has the windscreen about halfway back from the bow. The fore deck is....A Fore deck. This is Not an open bowrider. My "Bow" cleat is located about two feet in front of the windscreen..so I can stand up from the drivers seat and reach over and connect/disconnect my "Bow" line while docking.

As arranged, my Bow line actually works as a "Bow" line AND a "Spring" line. Once underway..ALL my docklines are removed from their cleats and stowed in the cockpit.

Everyone will have their own routine for docking/undocking. Some will work better than others. What I have described works for me. NB

EDIT: Please NOTE: There is a Bowline..A KNOT, and then there is a Bow Line..A ROPE.

Last edited by NoBozo; 06-01-2012 at 06:25 PM.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:39 PM   #15
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Default Dock lines

One technique that I used several times when at an away port was to hand off to a person on the dock a line with a reasonable loop at the dock end and have the person on the dock simply drop it over a piling. Then I just adjusted the length at the boat end and cleated it off. I say, with some humility, that I generally trusted my own skills with a line more than I trusted a well-meaning stranger on the dock. Using the loop method allows two boats to be tied to the same piling and either can disengage without disturbing the other. At my own dock I had measured lines attached to the dock with snap hooks into eye bolts at the dock end and spliced eyes at the boat end. This made for very easy get-a-way, and fall put-a-way was equally as easy, as was spring set up. I think tying a boat is a matter of listening to others and their methods, and then doing what works best for you in your personal circumstances.
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Old 06-02-2012, 05:20 AM   #16
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Try this...

Put a short piece of ribbon through the line, a few feet from one end. Place the ribbon against the cleat and use the trailing end to secure to the cleat. Secure the other end to the other cleat. Adjust it until perfect, mark where that line meets the cleat and add a ribbion there too. Make up another line to match.

You can also use shrink-wrap or marker. Adding ribbon or shrink-wrap will give you something you can feel which will help you when it's dark.

I added an indicator like this to my anchor-rode so I know the chain is just about to scratch my finish. There's another a few feet from the bitter.

Good luck!
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