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Old 04-01-2012, 07:02 AM   #1
Slickcraft
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Default Turkey Strut

Not a very good photo taken through a window but you get the idea. Every year our front yard becomes a prime location for turkey social activities. While this hen briefly did sit down, her several friends out of the frame must of told her that she could do better. So all six hens marched away single file leaving Tom to strut for a while all alone.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:15 AM   #2
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Talking Turkey!

Thanks for sharing your cool photo!
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:02 PM   #3
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Default Turkey Strut

Are these feathered friends strutting on Welch Island? Are there turkeys on any island?
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Old 04-01-2012, 06:16 PM   #4
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Are these feathered friends strutting on Welch Island? Are there turkeys on any island?
No, they were here in West Alton up on Turkey Hill, so called. Early last year there were some on Welch, don't know if they are any there this year. Tomorrow will be our 1st overnight on Welch this year.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:53 AM   #5
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Talking Turkeys

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Are these feathered friends strutting on Welch Island? Are there turkeys on any island?
They can definitely be found on Rattlesnake Island!


Rattlesnake Island turkeys from the gallery of myself, Rattlesnake Gal.


Sharing breakfast on Rattlesnake Island. Photo taken by Island Girl.


You should have seen this fella in full strut! Wish I grabbed my camera faster!




These photos were taken by DBA, who is also a fellow islander.


This shot taken by DRH shows how they might get to an island.


We had startled the turkey that was nesting and she took off for a bit. She did make her way back to the nest.


It was pretty neat finding this turkey nesting up behind our camp. It is my understanding that finding a nest like this is unusual.


I was so excited at the prospect of seeing little turkey babies running around, but we took an overnight trip home and missed the whole thing.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:00 AM   #6
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Great collection of photos RG, you were fortunate to find the nest nearby. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:38 AM   #7
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I have at least 30 turkeys on my land in Hollis, so if anyone needs some stop by

I've looked in the obvious areas and never found a nest but we do get chicks every year so there are nests somewhere.

BTW they fly like jumbo jets, slow to launch but I'm sure they can fly to the islands.

Unfortunately for the turkeys but probably fortunate for us, the foxes seem to keep the population in check by picking off the chicks.

It's fun to have them back but with their continued growth and expansion, they may become a nuisance soon, just like Canada geese.
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Old 04-03-2012, 05:42 PM   #8
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I loved the pics RG. So interesting to know they are now on the islands. They have made quite a comeback. I wonder how easily (or hard) they survive winters there.
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Old 04-03-2012, 05:59 PM   #9
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Default Seem to do ok.

We have a lot of them out behind our place in Belmont. With hundreds of acres of nothing but woods we have lots of animals.
I see their tracks all over the place during the winter and we have two neighbors who feed them on a regular basis.
One of these days Iím going to find out just how a wild turkey tastes.
Iím thinking smoked would be best.
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Old 04-03-2012, 06:11 PM   #10
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Thanks for sharing, I love these wild life pics. Wild turkey is really not that good for eating my friend! It's very tough, stringy and "gamey". Makes a good drink though
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Old 04-04-2012, 08:35 PM   #11
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Well it's about $40 for a hunting license and a turkey stamp. With that you can take two turkeys.

On a cost basis, you can buy two damn nice Butterballs for less than $40.

On a "challenge of the hunt" basis, it's easier than fish in a barrel. I could "hunt" two in five minutes with any weapon. Might take ten minutes with my bare hands.

So they better taste good.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:32 AM   #12
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Default license?

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Well it's about $40 for a hunting license and a turkey stamp. With that you can take two turkeys.

On a cost basis, you can buy two damn nice Butterballs for less than $40.

On a "challenge of the hunt" basis, it's easier than fish in a barrel. I could "hunt" two in five minutes with any weapon. Might take ten minutes with my bare hands.

So they better taste good.
I could be wrong but I though if you hunted on your own land there was no license needed, you just need to tag & report it.
Hell on some mornings I could shoot them from my bedroom window.
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:08 AM   #13
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For those that have never tasted wild turkey, the one with feathers that is, you can't really roast it like a butterball; it would turn out very dry. best prepared as a stew and the taste and consistancy would be similar to beef.
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:40 PM   #14
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Default Turkey lodge.

I saw this turkey nest on Rte. 25 in Ossipee today.
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Old 04-05-2012, 06:37 PM   #15
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JP I hope your tongue is in your cheek. Beaver home, maybe?
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:16 AM   #16
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I disagree with the comments on the quality of the meat. Wild game is more lean than domestic so this needs to be accounted for when cooking. Low and slow is the way to go and don't over cook. Many people think wild game is full of unclean things compared to farm raised and cook the heck out of it. Stewing makes anything tender but also takes away from it's natural flavor. You can roast a wild turkey and it will be just fine. Breast meat is "white-ish"...not quite as white as farm raised but white meat non-the-less. People that like thigh meat because it's got a richer flavor will like wild turkey.

As to ease of hunting them. It sure seems easy when they are in your backyard (or in my case waiting in my office entrance way) but both places are illegal to hunt them (too close to buildings...probably wouldn't make neighbors happy). Also baiting them (shooting them coming into food you have set out) is not good form and I believe illegal. If you enter their environment (get away from homes), they are surprisingly alert and tuned into their environment with excellent eye sight and instincts (how else could a 20 pound bird survive a winter of hungry coyotes?). I've taken a few but never had an "easy hunt". This year with the early thaw and warm weather, mating activity seems to be kicking in early. Its that mating activity that allows hunters to lure them in with the promise of 'love'. I think that by May (the season), these birds will be growing tired of their natural drives and very hard to hunt.

...and yes they are an amazing come back story. An animal that has adapted well to rural and suburban (even urban) environments. Won't be long now that people begin considering them in the same category as geese as far as nuisance. A few neighborhood car accidents involving them changes perception quickly.
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Old 04-08-2012, 07:29 AM   #17
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Arrow My Research on Tenderizing

MikeF-NH, thanks for the great information about wild game! When I see all the pesky geese I wonder why they aren't hunted more often?! There are a lot of hungry people who could benefit from then and it would solve the overpopulation problem.

Inspired by the Recipe thread, I have been doing some reasearch on how to best prepare alligator that I have been wanting to try. I came across an interesting article about marinating and tenderizing. Milk, buttermilk, sourcream and yogurt seem to be the way to go.

Marinades Add Flavor, but Don't Always Tenderize
http://m.finecooking.com/articles/ma...tenderize.aspx
(I do prefer to embed my links, but it is proving tedious from my iPhone.)
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Old 04-08-2012, 08:46 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rattlesnake Gal View Post
MikeF-NH, thanks for the great information about wild game! When I see all the pesky geese I wonder why they aren't hunted more often?! There are a lot of hungry people who could benefit from then and it would solve the overpopulation problem.

Inspired by the Recipe thread, I have been doing some reasearch on how to best prepare alligator that I have been wanting to try. I came across an interesting article about marinating and tenderizing. Milk, buttermilk, sourcream and yogurt seem to be the way to go.

Marinades Add Flavor, but Don't Always Tenderize
http://m.finecooking.com/articles/ma...tenderize.aspx
(I do prefer to embed my links, but it is proving tedious from my iPhone.)
You have ALLIGATORS on Rattlesnake Island??? !!!
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Old 04-08-2012, 09:05 AM   #19
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RG, I found this looking for clam info. I thought you might find it of interest. JP

Alligator is a lean meat that is low in fat and cholesterol and high in protein. It is available in a variety of cuts, including tail meat fillets, ribs, nuggets, and wings. Tail meat, the choicest cut, is a mild-flavored white meat that has a texture similar to veal. Ribs, nuggets, and wings are darker meat with a stronger taste and a texture similar to pork shoulder. Alligator meat is versatile and can be used in just about any recipe as a substitute for chicken, pork, veal, or fish.

Alligator meat is usually purchased frozen, but it is also available fresh. Thaw frozen meat in the refrigerator and use promptly. Use a meat mallet to tenderize fillets and flatten the meat to your desired thickness. Alligator meat can be ground or finely chopped to make sausage, patties, or taco filling. Alligator’s mild flavor is easily enhanced with seasonings, sauces, and marinades.

http://www.fl-seafood.com/

Florida Seafood - Alligator Recipes

http://www.fl-seafood.com/recipes/alligator_recipes.htm
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Old 04-08-2012, 10:06 AM   #20
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you can pick up alligator meat as well as other interesting meat to try in Chichester at:
http://www.healthybuffalo.com/

I've had plenty of buffalo and it is fantastic. I've heard Imu is very good but never tried.
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